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This is the code I have in my first class:

public class Factorial {
public void Sequence(){
    String value = JOptionPane.showInputDialog("Please enter the number of which you want your shit.");
    System.out.println("Factorial:");
    System.out.println(fact(Integer.valueOf(value)));
    getValues(Integer.valueOf(value));
}

public static int getValues(int n){
    return n;
}

And this is a subclass of Factorial:

public class Fibonacci extends Factorial {
    public void Sequence(){
        Factorial get = new Factorial();
                //not working EDIT: Just realized this obv wont work, but still need help to get it to work
        get.getValues(n);

However I cannot get the Value returned in the getValues from the Factorial Class

share|improve this question
2  
Subclassing won't help with making recursively-generated number sequences easier. –  Dai Jan 11 at 0:31
    
I have a program in which the user enters a number and it gives the value of that number in a a lot of other sequences. I'm just exploring recursion and trying to use polymorphism at the same time (I have other classes too) –  Hassaan Hafeez Jan 11 at 0:33
2  
You might want to tag this with the language you're using. Because when I try to run this in INTERCAL, I get errors about not using 'PLEASE' in enough statements, so I suspect it may be C# or Java or something. –  abarnert Jan 11 at 0:39
    
@abarnert Sorry, you are correct I should have. However Dukeling just edited the tags 1 minute ago and put java. –  Hassaan Hafeez Jan 11 at 0:40
    
@HassaanHafeez: No problem. It was a comment intended to help you (because with the Java tag it's more likely to attract Java experts who can answer your question, instead of random people many of whom never use Java), not a judgment on your question. –  abarnert Jan 11 at 0:49

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Here (below) value is used to store user input

public class Factorial {
public String value;
public void sequence(){
    value = JOptionPane.showInputDialog("Please enter the number of which you want your shit.");
    System.out.println("Factorial:");
    System.out.println(fact(Integer.valueOf(value)));
    getValues(Integer.valueOf(value));
}

public static int getValues(int n){
    return n;
}
public String getValue(){return value;}
}

public class Fibonacci extends Factorial {
    //Method sequence is overridden here
    public void sequence(){
//can use getValue() here or anywhere...there is no need to use a separate object due to inheritance
}
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, but how do I then use that value the user inputted in my actuall Fibonacci sequence. –  Hassaan Hafeez Jan 11 at 1:26
    
@HassaanHafeez value will be visible to Fibonacci class due to inheritance. So you can directly access value inside Fibonacci –  boxed__l Jan 11 at 1:36
    
So basically the getValues are useless? –  Hassaan Hafeez Jan 11 at 1:43
1  
Yes, like I tried to explain :) –  Takendarkk Jan 11 at 1:46
    
getValue()s become relevant when value is private –  boxed__l Jan 11 at 1:50

Polymorphism is not really a bad abstraction here but there's not really a way to "help you fix what you're doing". There's sortof obvious reasons polymorphism just doesn't work the way you're trying to use it. As I mentioned, one of them being that static methods can't be overridden so your getValue can only ever return the input number. The other reason is that you're creating an instance of a superclass from within a subclass and there's never a reason this is necessary. You also proceed to call a static method on said superclass instance which is also unnecessary.

So the short of it is that while you came here to ask a question about a compiler error related to the variable n, your code shows that you are way ahead of yourself. If you want to learn polymorphism, you should start with a tutorial. What you said in a comment--"want the value of n (the user input) to be used in multiple classes"--your code in the OP isn't going to help you achieve that because it's fundamentally faulty polymorphic design. I don't mean that as an insult, it just is and you should probably start over.

Here is a more typical design that you can use as a guideline:

public class Main {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        String input = JOptionPane.showInputDialog("Enter a number:");
        int n = Integer.parseInt(input);

        System.out.println(new Factorial().getResult(n));
    }
}

public interface Sequence {
    public int getResult(int n);
}

public class Factorial
implements Sequence {
    @Override
    public int getResult(int n) {
        int result = n;
        while(n > 1) {
            n--;
            result *= n;
        }

        return result;
    }
}

There is also not really an object-oriented reason here for Fibonacci to extend Factorial.

If you really wanted to include retrieving input with the Sequence class, you could do it neatly like this:

public abstract class Sequence {
    private static int getInput() { // static because it relies on no state
        return Integer.parseInt(
            JOptionPane.showInputDialog("Enter a number:")
        );
    }

    public final int getResultFromInput() { // simply calls getInput and getResult
        return getResult(getInput());       // sub classes will not need to do
    }                                       // anything with this method

    public abstract int getResult(int n);   // sub classes override this method
}                                           // to provide their functionality

public class Factorial
extends Sequence {
    @Override
    public int getResult(int n) {

        // same as above factorial

    }
}

And then you can do this:

System.out.println(new Factorial().getResultFromInput());

I would argue it's not really OOP-correct for a number sequence object to do things like show dialog boxes but there's not a reason you can't do it.

Also, as a minor side note, you should use long instead of int. Factorials will result in overflow very quickly with int (after 12!). Not sure when exactly you get overflow from a Fibonacci sequence, certainly not as soon as factorial.

share|improve this answer
    
I was trying to use polymorphic arrays from my main class in a for loop. –  Hassaan Hafeez Jan 11 at 1:55
    
I'm not sure what you mean exactly by polymorphic array. In my examples you can, for instance, create an array of Sequence and loop through it somehow. Sequence[] sequences = { new Factorial(), new Fibonacci() }; –  Radiodef Jan 11 at 2:03
    
Well I saw a video yesterday that told me my very little knowledge of polymorphism. It had 4 classes just like mine with a main class and 1 super class with two subclasses that contain the same "void Sequence()" like my classes do. I created an arrayobject from my main class to my superclass Factorial and since the subclasses inherit from the super class, I made a for loop that basically processed all of their methods using arrayObject[x].Sequence(); –  Hassaan Hafeez Jan 11 at 2:10
    
See my updated opening paragraphs. Also if the video you watched had a void Sequence() with an uppercase 'S', it's probably a video you should take with a grain of salt. Java has official code conventions and all methods start with a lowercase letter. Not a joke either, these conventions are well known: all Java code should follow them. –  Radiodef Jan 11 at 2:46
2  
Generally speaking, inheritance is a kind of polymorphism. By extending a class and overriding a method the code is indeed polymorphic. –  Radiodef Jan 11 at 3:44

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