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It's pretty easy to write a function that computes the maximum drawdown of a time series. It takes a small bit of thinking to write it in O(n) time instead of O(n^2) time. But it's not that bad. This will work:

import numpy as np
import pandas as pd
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt

def max_dd(ser):
    max2here = pd.expanding_max(ser)
    dd2here = ser - max2here
    return dd2here.min()

Let's set up a brief series to play with to try it out:

np.random.seed(0)
n = 100
s = pd.Series(np.random.randn(n).cumsum())
s.plot()
plt.show()

Time series

As expected, max_dd(s) winds up showing something right around -17.6. Good, great, grand. Now say I'm interested in computing the rolling drawdown of this Series. I.e. for each step, I want to compute the maximum drawdown from the preceding sub series of a specified length. This is easy to do using pd.rolling_apply. It works like so:

rolling_dd = pd.rolling_apply(s, 10, max_dd, min_periods=0)
df = pd.concat([s, rolling_dd], axis=1)
df.columns = ['s', 'rol_dd_10']
df.plot()

rolling drawdown

This works perfectly. But it feels very slow. Is there a particularly slick algorithm in pandas or another toolkit to do this fast? I took a shot at writing something bespoke: it keeps track of all sorts of intermediate data (locations of observed maxima, locations of previously found drawdowns) to cut down on lots of redundant calculations. It does save some time, but not a whole lot, and not nearly as much as should be possible.

I think it's because of all the looping overhead in Python/Numpy/Pandas. But I'm not currently fluent enough in Cython to really know how to begin attacking this from that angle. I was hoping someone had tried this before. Or, perhaps, that someone might want to have a look at my "handmade" code and be willing to help me convert it to Cython.


Edit: For anyone who wants a review of all the functions mentioned here (and some others!) have a look at the iPython notebook at: http://nbviewer.ipython.org/gist/8one6/8506455

It shows how some of the approaches to this problem relate, checks that they give the same results, and shows their runtimes on data of various sizes.

If anyone is interested, the "bespoke" algorithm I alluded to in my post is rolling_dd_custom. I think that could be a very fast solution if implemented in Cython.

share|improve this question
up vote 10 down vote accepted

Here's a numpy version of the rolling maximum drawdown function. windowed_view is a wrapper of a one-line function that uses numpy.lib.stride_tricks.as_strided to make a memory efficient 2d windowed view of the 1d array (full code below). Once we have this windowed view, the calculation is basically the same as your max_dd, but written for a numpy array, and applied along the second axis (i.e. axis=1).

def rolling_max_dd(x, window_size, min_periods=1):
    """Compute the rolling maximum drawdown of `x`.

    `x` must be a 1d numpy array.
    `min_periods` should satisfy `1 <= min_periods <= window_size`.

    Returns an 1d array with length `len(x) - min_periods + 1`.
    """
    if min_periods < window_size:
        pad = np.empty(window_size - min_periods)
        pad.fill(x[0])
        x = np.concatenate((pad, x))
    y = windowed_view(x, window_size)
    running_max_y = np.maximum.accumulate(y, axis=1)
    dd = y - running_max_y
    return dd.min(axis=1)

Here's a complete script that demonstrates the function:

import numpy as np
from numpy.lib.stride_tricks import as_strided
import pandas as pd
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt


def windowed_view(x, window_size):
    """Creat a 2d windowed view of a 1d array.

    `x` must be a 1d numpy array.

    `numpy.lib.stride_tricks.as_strided` is used to create the view.
    The data is not copied.

    Example:

    >>> x = np.array([1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6])
    >>> windowed_view(x, 3)
    array([[1, 2, 3],
           [2, 3, 4],
           [3, 4, 5],
           [4, 5, 6]])
    """
    y = as_strided(x, shape=(x.size - window_size + 1, window_size),
                   strides=(x.strides[0], x.strides[0]))
    return y


def rolling_max_dd(x, window_size, min_periods=1):
    """Compute the rolling maximum drawdown of `x`.

    `x` must be a 1d numpy array.
    `min_periods` should satisfy `1 <= min_periods <= window_size`.

    Returns an 1d array with length `len(x) - min_periods + 1`.
    """
    if min_periods < window_size:
        pad = np.empty(window_size - min_periods)
        pad.fill(x[0])
        x = np.concatenate((pad, x))
    y = windowed_view(x, window_size)
    running_max_y = np.maximum.accumulate(y, axis=1)
    dd = y - running_max_y
    return dd.min(axis=1)


def max_dd(ser):
    max2here = pd.expanding_max(ser)
    dd2here = ser - max2here
    return dd2here.min()


if __name__ == "__main__":
    np.random.seed(0)
    n = 100
    s = pd.Series(np.random.randn(n).cumsum())

    window_length = 10

    rolling_dd = pd.rolling_apply(s, window_length, max_dd, min_periods=0)
    df = pd.concat([s, rolling_dd], axis=1)
    df.columns = ['s', 'rol_dd_%d' % window_length]
    df.plot(linewidth=3, alpha=0.4)

    my_rmdd = rolling_max_dd(s.values, window_length, min_periods=1)
    plt.plot(my_rmdd, 'g.')

    plt.show()

The plot shows the curves generated by your code. The green dots are computed by rolling_max_dd.

rolling drawdown plot

Timing comparison, with n = 10000 and window_length = 500:

In [2]: %timeit rolling_dd = pd.rolling_apply(s, window_length, max_dd, min_periods=0)
1 loops, best of 3: 247 ms per loop

In [3]: %timeit my_rmdd = rolling_max_dd(s.values, window_length, min_periods=1)
10 loops, best of 3: 38.2 ms per loop

rolling_max_dd is about 6.5 times faster. The speedup is better for smaller window lengths. For example, with window_length = 200, it is almost 13 times faster.

To handle NA's, you could preprocess the Series using the fillna method before passing the array to rolling_max_dd.

share|improve this answer
    
That comparison is a little unfair in context, because there are computations required to get to padded_ser and window_length you're not timing. (Your approach still wins by an order of magnitude, though.) – DSM Jan 11 '14 at 6:38
    
True, I only timed the main part of the computation. I included the padding in the code to get the same output as the pandas rolling_apply function at the beginning of the series. If the results are only needed for "full" windows, the padding step could be dropped, and instead the result of rolling_max_dd would be shifted by window_length - 1. – Warren Weckesser Jan 11 '14 at 6:47
    
Is there any reason to pad with the specific value you chose? I found that choice a bit confusing, though I don't think it causes problems. (I probably would have padded with the first value of the series.) Also, I'm inclined to accept this answer, but before I do, would you mind posting the timing for your full solution? I.e. can you post the timing for a single function that is a drop-in replacement for my approach so that the comparison is apples to apples? Could you also please post the timing with n = 10000 and window=500? – 8one6 Jan 11 '14 at 15:14
    
Also: your approach is done in numpy rather than pandas. So how does it do with NA's? The simple version I wrote using pandas handles NA's in the manner that I think of as appropriate for the problem at hand. – 8one6 Jan 11 '14 at 15:23
    
I updated the code to include the padding in the rolling_max_dd function, and changed the timing comparison to use the bigger n and window_length. It's not quite as impressive as before. :( The padding values is now simply the first value of the series (not sure what I was thinking before). NA's could be handled by preprocessing the series with the fillna method. – Warren Weckesser Jan 11 '14 at 19:41

For the sake of posterity and for completeness, here's what I wound up with in Cython. MemoryViews materially sped things up. There was a bit of work to do to make sure I'd properly typed everything (sorry, new to c-type languages). But in the end I think it works nicely. For typical use cases, the speedup vs regular python was ~100x or ~150x. The function to call is cy_rolling_dd_custom_mv where the first argument (ser) should be a 1-d numpy array and the second argument (window) should be a positive integer. The function returns a numpy memoryview, which works well enough in most cases. You can explicitly call np.array(result) if you need to to get a nice array of the output:

import numpy as np
cimport numpy as np
cimport cython

DTYPE = np.float64
ctypedef np.float64_t DTYPE_t

@cython.boundscheck(False)
@cython.wraparound(False)
@cython.nonecheck(False)
cpdef tuple cy_dd_custom_mv(double[:] ser):
    cdef double running_global_peak = ser[0]
    cdef double min_since_global_peak = ser[0]
    cdef double running_max_dd = 0

    cdef long running_global_peak_id = 0
    cdef long running_max_dd_peak_id = 0
    cdef long running_max_dd_trough_id = 0

    cdef long i
    cdef double val
    for i in xrange(ser.shape[0]):
        val = ser[i]
        if val >= running_global_peak:
            running_global_peak = val
            running_global_peak_id = i
            min_since_global_peak = val
        if val < min_since_global_peak:
            min_since_global_peak = val
            if val - running_global_peak <= running_max_dd:
                running_max_dd = val - running_global_peak
                running_max_dd_peak_id = running_global_peak_id
                running_max_dd_trough_id = i
    return (running_max_dd, running_max_dd_peak_id, running_max_dd_trough_id, running_global_peak_id)

@cython.boundscheck(False)
@cython.wraparound(False)
@cython.nonecheck(False)
def cy_rolling_dd_custom_mv(double[:] ser, long window):
    cdef double[:, :] result
    result = np.zeros((ser.shape[0], 4))

    cdef double running_global_peak = ser[0]
    cdef double min_since_global_peak = ser[0]
    cdef double running_max_dd = 0
    cdef long running_global_peak_id = 0
    cdef long running_max_dd_peak_id = 0
    cdef long running_max_dd_trough_id = 0
    cdef long i
    cdef double val
    cdef int prob_1
    cdef int prob_2
    cdef tuple intermed
    cdef long newthing

    for i in xrange(ser.shape[0]):
        val = ser[i]
        if i < window:
            if val >= running_global_peak:
                running_global_peak = val
                running_global_peak_id = i
                min_since_global_peak = val
            if val < min_since_global_peak:
                min_since_global_peak = val
                if val - running_global_peak <= running_max_dd:
                    running_max_dd = val - running_global_peak
                    running_max_dd_peak_id = running_global_peak_id
                    running_max_dd_trough_id = i

            result[i, 0] = <double>running_max_dd
            result[i, 1] = <double>running_max_dd_peak_id
            result[i, 2] = <double>running_max_dd_trough_id
            result[i, 3] = <double>running_global_peak_id

        else:
            prob_1 = 1 if result[i-1, 3] <= float(i - window) else 0
            prob_2 = 1 if result[i-1, 1] <= float(i - window) else 0
            if prob_1 or prob_2:
                intermed = cy_dd_custom_mv(ser[i-window+1:i+1])
                result[i, 0] = <double>intermed[0]
                result[i, 1] = <double>(intermed[1] + i - window + 1)
                result[i, 2] = <double>(intermed[2] + i - window + 1)
                result[i, 3] = <double>(intermed[3] + i - window + 1)
            else:
                newthing = <long>(int(result[i-1, 3]))
                result[i, 3] = i if ser[i] >= ser[newthing] else result[i-1, 3]
                if val - ser[newthing] <= result[i-1, 0]:
                    result[i, 0] = <double>(val - ser[newthing])
                    result[i, 1] = <double>result[i-1, 3]
                    result[i, 2] = <double>i
                else:
                    result[i, 0] = <double>result[i-1, 0]
                    result[i, 1] = <double>result[i-1, 1]
                    result[i, 2] = <double>result[i-1, 2]
    cdef double[:] finalresult = result[:, 0]
    return finalresult
share|improve this answer

Hello people. This is quite a complex problem if you want to solve this in a computationally efficient way for a rolling window. I have gone ahead and written a solution to this in C#. I want to share this as the effort required to replicate this work is quite high.

First, here are the results:

here we take a simple drawdown implementation and re-calculate for the full window each time

test1 - simple drawdown test with 30 period rolling window. run 100 times.
total seconds 0.8060461
test2 - simple drawdown test with 60 period rolling window. run 100 times.
total seconds 1.416081
test3 - simple drawdown test with 180 period rolling window. run 100 times.
total seconds 3.6602093
test4 - simple drawdown test with 360 period rolling window. run 100 times.
total seconds 6.696383
test5 - simple drawdown test with 500 period rolling window. run 100 times.
total seconds 8.9815137

here we compare to the results generated from my efficient rolling window algorithm where only the latest observation is added and then it does it's magic

test6 - running drawdown test with 30 period rolling window. run 100 times.
total seconds 0.2940168
test7 - running drawdown test with 60 period rolling window. run 100 times.
total seconds 0.3050175
test8 - running drawdown test with 180 period rolling window. run 100 times.
total seconds 0.3780216
test9 - running drawdown test with 360 period rolling window. run 100 times.
total seconds 0.4560261
test10 - running drawdown test with 500 period rolling window. run 100 times.
total seconds 0.5050288

At at 500 period window. We are achieving about a 20:1 improvement in calculation time.

Here is the code of the simple drawdown class used for the comparisons:

public class SimpleDrawDown
{
    public double Peak { get; set; }
    public double Trough { get; set; }
    public double MaxDrawDown { get; set; }

    public SimpleDrawDown()
    {
        Peak = double.NegativeInfinity;
        Trough = double.PositiveInfinity;
        MaxDrawDown = 0;
    }

    public void Calculate(double newValue)
    {
        if (newValue > Peak)
        {
            Peak = newValue;
            Trough = Peak;
        }
        else if (newValue < Trough)
        {
            Trough = newValue;
            var tmpDrawDown = Peak - Trough;
            if (tmpDrawDown > MaxDrawDown)
                MaxDrawDown = tmpDrawDown;
        }
    }
}

And here is the code for the full efficient implementation. Hopefully the code comments make sense.

internal class DrawDown
{
    int _n;
    int _startIndex, _endIndex, _troughIndex;
    public int Count { get; set; }
    LinkedList<double> _values;
    public double Peak { get; set; }
    public double Trough { get; set; }
    public bool SkipMoveBackDoubleCalc { get; set; }

    public int PeakIndex
    {
        get
        {
            return _startIndex;
        }
    }
    public int TroughIndex
    {
        get
        {
            return _troughIndex;
        }
    }

    //peak to trough return
    public double DrawDownAmount
    {
        get
        {
            return Peak - Trough;
        }
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// 
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="n">max window for drawdown period</param>
    /// <param name="peak">drawdown peak i.e. start value</param>
    public DrawDown(int n, double peak)
    {
        _n = n - 1;
        _startIndex = _n;
        _endIndex = _n;
        _troughIndex = _n;
        Count = 1;
        _values = new LinkedList<double>();
        _values.AddLast(peak);
        Peak = peak;
        Trough = peak;
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// adds a new observation on the drawdown curve
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="newValue"></param>
    public void Add(double newValue)
    {
        //push the start of this drawdown backwards
        //_startIndex--;
        //the end of the drawdown is the current period end
        _endIndex = _n;
        //the total periods increases with a new observation
        Count++;
        //track what all point values are in the drawdown curve
        _values.AddLast(newValue);
        //update if we have a new trough
        if (newValue < Trough)
        {
            Trough = newValue;
            _troughIndex = _endIndex;
        }
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Shift this Drawdown backwards in the observation window
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="trackingNewPeak">whether we are already tracking a new peak or not</param>
    /// <returns>a new drawdown to track if a new peak becomes active</returns>
    public DrawDown MoveBack(bool trackingNewPeak, bool recomputeWindow = true)
    {
        if (!SkipMoveBackDoubleCalc)
        {
            _startIndex--;
            _endIndex--;
            _troughIndex--;
            if (recomputeWindow)
                return RecomputeDrawdownToWindowSize(trackingNewPeak);
        }
        else
            SkipMoveBackDoubleCalc = false;

        return null;
    }

    private DrawDown RecomputeDrawdownToWindowSize(bool trackingNewPeak)
    {
        //the start of this drawdown has fallen out of the start of our observation window, so we have to recalculate the peak of the drawdown
        if (_startIndex < 0)
        {
            Peak = double.NegativeInfinity;
            _values.RemoveFirst();
            Count--;

            //there is the possibility now that there is a higher peak, within the current drawdown curve, than our first observation
            //when we find it, remove all data points prior to this point
            //the new peak must be before the current known trough point
            int iObservation = 0, iNewPeak = 0, iNewTrough = _troughIndex, iTmpNewPeak = 0, iTempTrough = 0;
            double newDrawDown = 0, tmpPeak = 0, tmpTrough = double.NegativeInfinity;
            DrawDown newDrawDownObj = null;
            foreach (var pointOnDrawDown in _values)
            {
                if (iObservation < _troughIndex)
                {
                    if (pointOnDrawDown > Peak)
                    {
                        iNewPeak = iObservation;
                        Peak = pointOnDrawDown;
                    }
                }
                else if (iObservation == _troughIndex)
                {
                    newDrawDown = Peak - Trough;
                    tmpPeak = Peak;
                }
                else
                {
                    //now continue on through the remaining points, to determine if there is a nested-drawdown, that is now larger than the newDrawDown
                    //e.g. higher peak beyond _troughIndex, with higher trough than that at _troughIndex, but where new peak minus new trough is > newDrawDown
                    if (pointOnDrawDown > tmpPeak)
                    {
                        tmpPeak = pointOnDrawDown;
                        tmpTrough = tmpPeak;
                        iTmpNewPeak = iObservation;
                        //we need a new drawdown object, as we have a new higher peak
                        if (!trackingNewPeak) 
                            newDrawDownObj = new DrawDown(_n + 1, tmpPeak);
                    }
                    else
                    {
                        if (!trackingNewPeak && newDrawDownObj != null)
                        {
                            newDrawDownObj.MoveBack(true, false); //recomputeWindow is irrelevant for this as it will never fall before period 0 in this usage scenario
                            newDrawDownObj.Add(pointOnDrawDown);  //keep tracking this new drawdown peak
                        }

                        if (pointOnDrawDown < tmpTrough)
                        {
                            tmpTrough = pointOnDrawDown;
                            iTempTrough = iObservation;
                            var tmpDrawDown = tmpPeak - tmpTrough;

                            if (tmpDrawDown > newDrawDown)
                            {
                                newDrawDown = tmpDrawDown;
                                iNewPeak = iTmpNewPeak;
                                iNewTrough = iTempTrough;
                                Peak = tmpPeak;
                                Trough = tmpTrough;
                            }
                        }
                    }
                }
                iObservation++;
            }

            _startIndex = iNewPeak; //our drawdown now starts from here in our observation window
            _troughIndex = iNewTrough;
            for (int i = 0; i < _startIndex; i++)
            {
                _values.RemoveFirst(); //get rid of the data points prior to this new drawdown peak
                Count--;
            }
            return newDrawDownObj;
        }
        return null;
    }

}

public class RunningDrawDown
{

    int _n;
    List<DrawDown> _drawdownObjs;
    DrawDown _currentDrawDown;
    DrawDown _maxDrawDownObj;

    /// <summary>
    /// The Peak of the MaxDrawDown
    /// </summary>
    public double DrawDownPeak
    {
        get
        {
            if (_maxDrawDownObj == null) return double.NegativeInfinity;
            return _maxDrawDownObj.Peak;
        }
    }
    /// <summary>
    /// The Trough of the Max DrawDown
    /// </summary>
    public double DrawDownTrough
    {
        get
        {
            if (_maxDrawDownObj == null) return double.PositiveInfinity;
            return _maxDrawDownObj.Trough;
        }
    }
    /// <summary>
    /// The Size of the DrawDown - Peak to Trough
    /// </summary>
    public double DrawDown
    {
        get
        {
            if (_maxDrawDownObj == null) return 0;
            return _maxDrawDownObj.DrawDownAmount;
        }
    }
    /// <summary>
    /// The Index into the Window that the Peak of the DrawDown is seen
    /// </summary>
    public int PeakIndex
    {
        get
        {
            if (_maxDrawDownObj == null) return 0;
            return _maxDrawDownObj.PeakIndex;
        }
    }
    /// <summary>
    /// The Index into the Window that the Trough of the DrawDown is seen
    /// </summary>
    public int TroughIndex
    {
        get
        {
            if (_maxDrawDownObj == null) return 0;
            return _maxDrawDownObj.TroughIndex;
        }
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Creates a running window for the calculation of MaxDrawDown within the window
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="n">the number of periods within the window</param>
    public RunningDrawDown(int n)
    {
        _n = n;
        _currentDrawDown = null;
        _drawdownObjs = new List<DrawDown>();
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// The new value to add onto the end of the current window (the first value will drop off)
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="newValue">the new point on the curve</param>
    public void Calculate(double newValue)
    {
        if (double.IsNaN(newValue)) return;

        if (_currentDrawDown == null)
        {
            var drawDown = new DrawDown(_n, newValue);
            _currentDrawDown = drawDown;
            _maxDrawDownObj = drawDown;
        }
        else
        {
            //shift current drawdown back one. and if the first observation falling outside the window means we encounter a new peak after the current trough, we start tracking a new drawdown
            var drawDownFromNewPeak = _currentDrawDown.MoveBack(false);

            //this is a special case, where a new lower peak (now the highest) is created due to the drop of of the pre-existing highest peak, and we are not yet tracking a new peak
            if (drawDownFromNewPeak != null)
            {
                _drawdownObjs.Add(_currentDrawDown); //record this drawdown into our running drawdowns list)
                _currentDrawDown.SkipMoveBackDoubleCalc = true; //MoveBack() is calculated again below in _drawdownObjs collection, so we make sure that is skipped this first time
                _currentDrawDown = drawDownFromNewPeak;
                _currentDrawDown.MoveBack(true);
            }

            if (newValue > _currentDrawDown.Peak)
            {
                //we need a new drawdown object, as we have a new higher peak
                var drawDown = new DrawDown(_n, newValue);
                //do we have an existing drawdown object, and does it have more than 1 observation
                if (_currentDrawDown.Count > 1)
                {
                    _drawdownObjs.Add(_currentDrawDown); //record this drawdown into our running drawdowns list)
                    _currentDrawDown.SkipMoveBackDoubleCalc = true; //MoveBack() is calculated again below in _drawdownObjs collection, so we make sure that is skipped this first time
                }
                _currentDrawDown = drawDown;
            }
            else
            {
                //add the new observation to the current drawdown
                _currentDrawDown.Add(newValue);
            }
        }

        //does our new drawdown surpass any of the previous drawdowns?
        //if so, we can drop the old drawdowns, as for the remainer of the old drawdowns lives in our lookup window, they will be smaller than the new one
        var newDrawDown = _currentDrawDown.DrawDownAmount;
        _maxDrawDownObj = _currentDrawDown;
        var maxDrawDown = newDrawDown;
        var keepDrawDownsList = new List<DrawDown>();
        foreach (var drawDownObj in _drawdownObjs)
        {
            drawDownObj.MoveBack(true);
            if (drawDownObj.DrawDownAmount > newDrawDown)
            {
                keepDrawDownsList.Add(drawDownObj);
            }

            //also calculate our max drawdown here
            if (drawDownObj.DrawDownAmount > maxDrawDown)
            {
                maxDrawDown = drawDownObj.DrawDownAmount;
                _maxDrawDownObj = drawDownObj;
            }

        }
        _drawdownObjs = keepDrawDownsList;

    }

}

Example usage:

RunningDrawDown rd = new RunningDrawDown(500);
foreach (var input in data)
{
    rd.Calculate(input);
    Console.WriteLine(string.Format("max draw {0:0.00000}, peak {1:0.00000}, trough {2:0.00000}, drawstart {3:0.00000}, drawend {4:0.00000}",
        rd.DrawDown, rd.DrawDownPeak, rd.DrawDownTrough, rd.PeakIndex, rd.TroughIndex));
}
share|improve this answer
# BEGIN: TRADEWAVE MOVING AVERAGE CROSSOVER EXAMPLE
THRESHOLD = 0.005 
INTERVAL = 43200 
SHORT = 10 
LONG = 90 

def initialize():

    storage.invested = storage.get('invested', False)

def tick():

    short_term = data(interval=INTERVAL).btc_usd.ma(SHORT)
    long_term = data(interval=INTERVAL).btc_usd.ma(LONG)
    diff = 100 * (short_term - long_term) / ((short_term + long_term) / 2)

    if diff >= THRESHOLD and not storage.invested:
        buy(pairs.btc_usd)
        storage.invested = True
    elif diff <= -THRESHOLD and storage.invested:
        sell(pairs.btc_usd)
        storage.invested = False

    plot('short_term', short_term) 
    plot('long_term', long_term)
    # END: TRADEWAVE MOVING AVERAGE CROSSOVER EXAMPLE  
    ##############################################################

    ##############################################################
    # BEGIN MAX DRAW DOWN by litepresence
    # vvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvv  

    dd()

ROLLING = 30 # days       

def dd():

    dd, storage.max_dd = max_dd(0)
    bnh_dd, storage.max_bnh_dd = bnh_max_dd(0)
    rolling_dd, storage.max_rolling_dd = max_dd(
        ROLLING*86400/info.interval)    
    rolling_bnh_dd, storage.max_rolling_bnh_dd = bnh_max_dd(
        ROLLING*86400/info.interval)

    plot('dd', dd, secondary=True)   
    plot('bnh_dd', bnh_dd, secondary=True)    
    plot('rolling_dd', rolling_dd, secondary=True)  
    plot('rolling_bnh_dd', rolling_bnh_dd, secondary=True)       
    plot('zero', 0, secondary=True)
    if info.tick == 0:
        plot('dd_floor', -200, secondary=True)

def max_dd(rolling):

    port_value = float(portfolio.usd+portfolio.btc*data.btc_usd.price)
    max_value = 'max_value_' + str(rolling)
    values_since_max = 'values_since_max_' + str(rolling)
    max_dd = 'max_dd_' + str(rolling)
    storage[max_value] = storage.get(max_value, [port_value])
    storage[values_since_max] = storage.get(values_since_max, [port_value])
    storage[max_dd] = storage.get(max_dd, [0])
    storage[max_value].append(port_value)    
    if port_value > max(storage[max_value]):
        storage[values_since_max] = [port_value]
    else:
        storage[values_since_max].append(port_value)
    storage[max_value] = storage[max_value][-rolling:]
    storage[values_since_max] = storage[values_since_max][-rolling:]    
    dd = -100*(max(storage[max_value]) - storage[values_since_max][-1]
        )/max(storage[max_value])
    storage[max_dd].append(float(dd))
    storage[max_dd] = storage[max_dd][-rolling:]
    max_dd = min(storage[max_dd])

    return (dd, max_dd)

def bnh_max_dd(rolling):

    coin = data.btc_usd.price
    bnh_max_value = 'bnh_max_value_' + str(rolling)
    bnh_values_since_max = 'bnh_values_since_max_' + str(rolling)
    bnh_max_dd = 'bnh_max_dd_' + str(rolling)    
    storage[bnh_max_value] = storage.get(bnh_max_value, [coin])
    storage[bnh_values_since_max] = storage.get(bnh_values_since_max, [coin])
    storage[bnh_max_dd] = storage.get(bnh_max_dd, [0]) 
    storage[bnh_max_value].append(coin)
    if coin > max(storage[bnh_max_value]):
        storage[bnh_values_since_max] = [coin]        
    else:
        storage[bnh_values_since_max].append(coin)
    storage[bnh_max_value] = storage[bnh_max_value][-rolling:]        
    storage[bnh_values_since_max] = storage[bnh_values_since_max][-rolling:]  
    bnh_dd = -100*(max(storage[bnh_max_value]) - storage[bnh_values_since_max][-1]
        )/max(storage[bnh_max_value])
    storage[bnh_max_dd].append(float(bnh_dd))
    storage[bnh_max_dd] = storage[bnh_max_dd][-rolling:]  
    bnh_max_dd = min(storage[bnh_max_dd])   

    return (bnh_dd, bnh_max_dd)    


def stop():

    log('MAX DD......: %.2f pct' % storage.max_dd)
    log('R MAX DD....: %.2f pct' % storage.max_rolling_dd)
    log('MAX BNH DD..: %.2f pct' % storage.max_bnh_dd)
    log('R MAX BNH DD: %.2f pct' % storage.max_rolling_bnh_dd)     

enter image description here

[2015-03-04 00:00:00] MAX DD......: -67.94 pct
[2015-03-04 00:00:00] R MAX DD....: -4.93 pct
[2015-03-04 00:00:00] MAX BNH DD..: -82.88 pct
[2015-03-04 00:00:00] R MAX BNH DD: -26.38 pct
  • Draw Down
  • Max Drawn Down
  • Buy and Hold Draw Down
  • Buy and Hold Max Draw Down
  • Rolling Draw Down
  • Rolling Max Drawn Down
  • Rolling Buy and Hold Draw Down
  • Rolling Buy and Hold Max Draw Down

No pandas, cython, or numpy dependencies. All calculations via simple lists.

Definitions are reusable for multiple rolling window sizes in the same script. You will have to edit the series input for your platform as this is designed for Bitcoin trading at tradewave.net

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