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I got 2 functions:

var number1 = 9
var number2 = 17;

//Get Percent of a the number1
function getPercent(x, y) {
    return x * 100 / y;
}
var percentOfNumber1 = getPercent(number1, number2);

//Get rid of remainder 
function getRemain(t) {
    var remainder = t % 2;
    t = t - remainder;
    return t;
}
alert(getRemain(percentOfNumber1));

That works..but I want to close the getRemain function in the first function.

so What I did and I dont' get result with:

function getPercent(x, y) {
    return x * 100 / y;

    function getRemain(t) {
        var remainder = t % 2;
        t = t - remainder;
        return t;
    }
    var numberClear = getRemain(result);
}
var result = getPercent(number1, number2);
alert(numberClear);

Can anyone explain the wrong approach to this? "this is the first time I try closures I read couple of good explanations but didin't get the calling functions part really good I guess.." Thnx.

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3  
If you indent your code you will see it makes no sense. –  zerkms Jan 11 '14 at 9:51
    
that comment doesn't make sense to me either! –  user2045937 Jan 11 '14 at 10:03
1  

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You need to declare numberClear outside if you want to access it outside:

var numberClear;

function getPercent(x, y) {
    function getRemain(t) {
        return t - t % 2;
    }
    var result = x * 100 / y;
    numberClear = getRemain(result);
    return result;
}

var result = getPercent(number1, number2);
alert(numberClear);
share|improve this answer
    
That works exactly as I want.. –  user2045937 Jan 11 '14 at 10:01
    
You should never rely on globals though. –  Matteo Tassinari Jan 11 '14 at 10:02
    
@Matteo Tassinari: where do you see any globals in this code? –  zerkms Jan 11 '14 at 10:03
    
@zerkms I was referring to the first line. –  Matteo Tassinari Jan 11 '14 at 10:06
    
@Matteo Tassinari: and it's not a global variable –  zerkms Jan 11 '14 at 10:07

Why not this?

Return both the values at once

function getPercentage(a, b){
   function getRemain(t)
    {
        var remainder = t % 2;
        t = t - remainder;
        return t; 
    }
   return {
      percentage: a / b * 100,
      remain: getRemain(a / b * 100)
   }
};

var result = getPercentage(9, 17);
alert(result.percentage);
alert(result.remain);
share|improve this answer

You simply didn't return the result properly:

function getPercent(x,y)
{
    function getRemain(t)
    {
        var remainder = t % 2;
        t = t - remainder;
        return t; 
    }
    return getRemain(x * 100 / y); // <-- return what getRemain() gives you!
}

var result = getPercent(number1, number2);
share|improve this answer
    
It might be helpful to explain that there is no closures in this code as well –  zerkms Jan 11 '14 at 9:53
    
If there is no closure in this code then I understood closures totally wrong..In stead of writing comment to everyone why don't you explain what I am trying to do and why It does't work.. –  user2045937 Jan 11 '14 at 9:57
    
There is a closure in this.. –  FabianCook Jan 11 '14 at 9:57
1  
@FabianCook: "A closure is a function that isn't accessible in the global scope" --- not even close. developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/JavaScript/Guide/Closures –  zerkms Jan 11 '14 at 9:58
1  
dmitrysoshnikov.com/ecmascript/chapter-6-closures "we see that all functions in ECMAScript are closures" –  FabianCook Jan 11 '14 at 10:43

There is no way to access a variable declared inside a function from outside it.

You could try this:

var getPercent = (function() {
  function getRemain(t)
  {
    var remainder = t % 2;
    t = t - remainder;
    return t;
  }

  return function (x,y)
  {
    var percent = x * 100 / y;
    return {
      percent: percent,
      remainder: getRemain(percent)
    };     
  }
})();

In this way the getRemain function is not accessible and the getPercent function will return both the percent and remainder values.

share|improve this answer
    
Why do you give a name for function expression? –  zerkms Jan 11 '14 at 9:53
    
In this case it has no practical utility, but I like it more this way. –  Matteo Tassinari Jan 11 '14 at 9:54
1  
And window.getPercent is a terrible advice - to pollute a global scope without a real reason. You might have returned an anonymous function from your IIFE instead –  zerkms Jan 11 '14 at 9:55
    
@zerkms How would you access the function from outside the closure instead? –  Matteo Tassinari Jan 11 '14 at 9:56
    
1. There are no any closures in your code, only named and anonymous functions 2. I would just return it –  zerkms Jan 11 '14 at 9:56

try this

var numberClear;

    function getPercent(x, y) {
        var percentange = x * 100 / y;
        numberClear = getRemain(result); // set your numberClear Variable here
        return percentange;
    }

     function getRemain(t) {
            return t - t % 2;
        }

    var result = getPercent(number1, number2);
    alert(numberClear);
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