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I was wandering what is better/preferred practice while performing negation of a boolean variable, XOR or NOT?

bool someVariable;

I even don't know why, but I always use XOR, I just like it more:

someVariable ^= true;

However, the more obvious way is to use NOT:

someVariable = !someVariable;

I am probably using the first way so I don't need to type the name of a variable twice, reducing possibility of some errors, typos, etc. It is also less characters to type if the variable is longer than a few chars :)

However, the first way is not really obvious on the first look for anybody who do not use this trick.

Also, the XOR is IMHO more readable because you are sure that the negation is applied on the variable. The NOT could be with two different variables and it is easy to miss if the names look similar:

affect = !effect;

What are advantages and disadvantages of those two approaches? What should I use? Or it is only matter of personal preference?

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I think both are pretty self-explanatory... Use whatever you want! But it also depends on whom you're coding with. Student => NOT, experienced programmers => your choice. Just be consistent. –  StackOverflowException Jan 11 at 15:46
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@StackOverflowException Experienced programmers => also NOT, because they know that readability is golden. –  user529758 Jan 11 at 15:51
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Reserve bitwise operations (like xor) for bitwise manipulation. Use ! to invert a logical value (boolean). Just don't use use the != compound assignment operator :D –  Jonathan Leffler Jan 11 at 15:52
    
@JonathanLeffler You're so sinister :D –  user529758 Jan 11 at 15:58
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if that is the worry, I guess every reasonable language would allow for a function doing something like negate(affect) (passing by ref); C++ would, C would force the use of & (or macros...), in other OO language there could be a method of the class, e.g. affect.negate(), and so on... and IMO if this is the worry, it means variables are poorly named: affect can be mistyped/misread as effect and viceversa everywhere else in the code, not only when you have to repeat it for a !. –  ShinTakezou Jan 11 at 16:23

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Semantics

Always go for semantically reasonable code. someVariable ^= true; is correct for sure, but might require thinking what it does (and why) to readers unused to this version of negating.

someVariable = !someVariable; is very explicit about what it is doing: it negates someVariable without any possibility nor requirement to interpret it.

Further Effects

Furthermore it might be that some code analysis software can do whatever it might be able to (optimization, error analysis, ...) with the !-version, but fail at the rather unexpected ^-statement. During compilation, it might happen that the XOR-version is slower as (depending on the platform) can require to load true into another register before performing the operation. This effect is negligible in probably all cases, but the additional register used might be not.

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I wish there was some unary operator for negation of a variable :) –  NightElfik Jan 11 at 18:35
    
If you really need some short hand version, just do something like function not($value) { !$value }. Some languages will even allow you to add new operators, you could probably do something like using !! for not(...). Anyway, just negating a variable is rather rare (though it does happen, of course); for complex examples like the one @Jonathan Leffler provided you probably should do some more object orientation style without directly providing inner fields anyway. –  Jens Erat Jan 11 at 18:54

IMHO you should use the NOT approach because its way more readable and one can instantly understand whats going on.

I am probably using the first way so I don't need to type the name of a variable twice, reducing possibility of some errors, typos, etc. It is also less characters to type if the variable is longer than a few chars :)

If you are using an IDE, you wont be typing more than a couple of chars either way :)

However, the first way is not really obvious on the first look for anybody who do not use this trick.

Absolutely true. I've never seen this before.

What should I use? Or it is only matter of personal preference?

Well, code is written once, but read many times, so you should go with the option that most people find more readable, and IMHO, its the "NOT" approach. Reserve the bitwise operators for bitwise operations:)

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NOT because it is more readable and because it actually communicates what you intend to do. You want to negate a logical value, not perform an XOR operation.

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Definitely NOT (!) is better — that's because:

  1. it is more readable for most of people who will ever need to modify your code.
  2. it is faster — xor is slower in most cases (and it gets two arguments while not takes only one)
  3. it doesn't take less to type when you use short variable names: e.g. a=!a is shorter than a^=true ;)
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I'd be curious to hear the justification for the speed claim. I agree with the general assertion, but not the claim that xor is slower. –  Jonathan Leffler Jan 11 at 15:59
    
i'm not sure ...to be honest - i just assumed it is slower because it is more complicated in definition: XOR = (a && !b) || (!a && b) –  webdev-dan Jan 11 at 16:37
    
hmm... i just made some googling and still don't know ...i think it deserves a separate question. –  webdev-dan Jan 11 at 16:44
    
That way of writing it would be slow, but XOR is usually a built-in operation at the chip level (single assembler language instruction) with a 1-cycle execution time — probably; I've not checked the cycle times on a CPU recently, but back in the days of Z80s, I'm fairly sure XOR between two registers was a single-cycle operation. –  Jonathan Leffler Jan 11 at 16:44
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@JonathanLeffler I think @webdev-dan concern is about the fact that, even supposing X is a register, on popular CISCs not X does not require an extra memory access, while xor X, value (or whatever) need to read value from memory... or anyway you need to preload it with another instruction… (but again, it depends on the specific cpu...) — for ARM, didn't see it! –  ShinTakezou Jan 11 at 16:50

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