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I'm loading an image from a file, and I want to know how to validate the image before it is fully read from the file.

string filePath = "image.jpg";
Image newImage = Image.FromFile(filePath);

The problem occurs when image.jpg isn't really a jpg. For example, if I create an empty text file and rename it to image.jpg, an OutOfMemory Exception will be thrown when image.jpg is loaded.

I'm looking for a function that will validate an image given a stream or a file path of the image.

Example function prototype

bool IsValidImage(string fileName);
bool IsValidImage(Stream imageStream);
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3  
Why not wrap that code in a try...catch block, and if it throws this exception, you can consider it "invalid"? Granted, this is a naive heuristic, but it does the job. Anything else will still have to open the file, so you aren't going to save a significant amount performance-wise regardless, IMO. –  Jason Bunting Oct 16 '08 at 23:41
    
See also: stackoverflow.com/questions/9354747/… –  Daryl Mar 5 '13 at 21:41

12 Answers 12

up vote 17 down vote accepted

JPEG's don't have a formal header definition, but they do have a small amount of metadata you can use.

  • Offset 0 (Two Bytes): JPEG SOI marker (FFD8 hex)
  • Offset 2 (Two Bytes): Image width in pixels
  • Offset 4 (Two Bytes): Image height in pixels
  • Offset 6 (Byte): Number of components (1 = grayscale, 3 = RGB)

There are a couple other things after that, but those aren't important.

You can open the file using a binary stream, and read this initial data, and make sure that OffSet 0 is 0, and OffSet 6 is either 1,2 or 3.

That would at least give you slightly more precision.

Or you can just trap the exception and move on, but I thought you wanted a challenge :)

share|improve this answer
    
I would have gone ahead and read the header for the file and compared it to an array of .NET supported images' file headers. Eventually, I'll code that up and post it as a solution for anyone that would need it in the future. –  SemiColon Oct 17 '08 at 0:48
1  
Just reading the headers will not guarantee that the file is valid and won't throw an exception when opened in Image.FromFile(). –  MusiGenesis Oct 17 '08 at 14:19
2  
No, but I didn't claim it would. –  FlySwat Oct 17 '08 at 14:46
2  
any sample code, please ? –  Kiquenet Jul 21 '10 at 20:44

here is my image check. I cannot rely on file extensions and have to check the format on my own. I am loading BitmapImages in WPF from byte arrays and don't know the format upfront. WPF detects the format fine but does not tell you the image format of BitmapImage objects (at least I am not aware of a property for this). And I don't want load the image again with System.Drawing only to detect the format. This solution is fast and works fine for me.

public enum ImageFormat
{
    bmp,
    jpeg,
    gif,
    tiff,
    png,
    unknown
}

public static ImageFormat GetImageFormat(byte[] bytes)
{
    // see http://www.mikekunz.com/image_file_header.html  
    var bmp    = Encoding.ASCII.GetBytes("BM");     // BMP
    var gif    = Encoding.ASCII.GetBytes("GIF");    // GIF
    var png    = new byte[] { 137, 80, 78, 71 };    // PNG
    var tiff   = new byte[] { 73, 73, 42 };         // TIFF
    var tiff2  = new byte[] { 77, 77, 42 };         // TIFF
    var jpeg   = new byte[] { 255, 216, 255, 224 }; // jpeg
    var jpeg2  = new byte[] { 255, 216, 255, 225 }; // jpeg canon

    if (bmp.SequenceEqual(bytes.Take(bmp.Length)))
        return ImageFormat.bmp;

    if (gif.SequenceEqual(bytes.Take(gif.Length)))
        return ImageFormat.gif;

    if (png.SequenceEqual(bytes.Take(png.Length)))
        return ImageFormat.png;

    if (tiff.SequenceEqual(bytes.Take(tiff.Length)))
        return ImageFormat.tiff;

    if (tiff2.SequenceEqual(bytes.Take(tiff2.Length)))
        return ImageFormat.tiff;

    if (jpeg.SequenceEqual(bytes.Take(jpeg.Length)))
        return ImageFormat.jpeg;

    if (jpeg2.SequenceEqual(bytes.Take(jpeg2.Length)))
        return ImageFormat.jpeg;

    return ImageFormat.unknown;
}
share|improve this answer
    
This is very nice! –  Dänu May 20 '12 at 13:42
    
very useful! after a few small adjustments I am able to detect image format. will save me a lot of work! thx! –  Val Cool Sep 22 at 8:58
    
The above code was failing for a particular PNG file. When I checked, the first 4 bytes contained {80, 75, 3, 4} instead of the sequence you've mentioned. The image can be opened by normal viewers/editors. What's going on? –  dotNET Oct 1 at 8:04
    
Additional headers: garykessler.net/library/file_sigs.html –  juFo Nov 5 at 8:55

Using Windows Forms:

bool IsValidImage(string filename)
{
    try
    {
        Image newImage = Image.FromFile(filename);
    }
    catch (OutOfMemoryException ex)
    {
        // Image.FromFile will throw this if file is invalid.
        // Don't ask me why.
        return false;
    }
    return true;
}

Otherwise if you're using WPF you can do the following:

bool IsValidImage(string filename)
{
    try
    {
        BitmapImage newImage = new BitmapImage(filename);
    }
    catch(NotSupportedException)
    {
        // System.NotSupportedException:
        // No imaging component suitable to complete this operation was found.
        return false;
    }
    return true;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks :) . I was thinking about doing that, but I was wondering if there was a way to do this that is already built into the .NET framework. Since no one else mentioned any built-in functions in the .NET framework to do this, I believe that this would be a good solution. –  SemiColon Oct 17 '08 at 0:41
    
You should probably catch OutOfMemoryException, which is the documented exception thrown if the file format is invalid. This means you would let FileNotFoundException propagate to the caller. –  Joe Oct 17 '08 at 7:19
    
I didn't realize that was the documented exception for an invalid image file. I just assumed there could be different exceptions thrown based on what exactly was wrong with the file. Thanks. –  MusiGenesis Oct 17 '08 at 14:15
1  
@Ervin: the question asker didn't think so, but I do, obviously. In the context of programming, you're not trying to determine if a file is some sort of Platonic ideal of a JPEG; you're trying to determine whether your program can open it and display it. I think the best way is to let .Net try to open it and tell you if it can or can't do that. –  MusiGenesis Sep 16 '09 at 13:45
1  
OutOfMemoryException is indeed the correct exception to trap according to MSDN!!! msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/stf701f5.aspx Microsoft, you never cease to amaze and baffle. –  James May 11 '10 at 20:33

Well, I went ahead and coded a set of functions to solve the problem. It checks the header first, then attempts to load the image in a try/catch block. It only checks for GIF, BMP, JPG, and PNG files. You can easily add more types by adding a header to imageHeaders.

static bool IsValidImage(string filePath)
{
    return File.Exists(filePath) && IsValidImage(new FileStream(filePath, FileMode.Open, FileAccess.Read));
}

static bool IsValidImage(Stream imageStream)
{
    if(imageStream.Length > 0)
    {
        byte[] header = new byte[4]; // Change size if needed.
        string[] imageHeaders = new[]{
                "\xFF\xD8", // JPEG
                "BM",       // BMP
                "GIF",      // GIF
                Encoding.ASCII.GetString(new byte[]{137, 80, 78, 71})}; // PNG

        imageStream.Read(header, 0, header.Length);

        bool isImageHeader = imageHeaders.Count(str => Encoding.ASCII.GetString(header).StartsWith(str)) > 0;
        if (isImageHeader == true)
        {
            try
            {
                Image.FromStream(imageStream).Dispose();
                imageStream.Close();
                return true;
            }

            catch
            {

            }
        }
    }

    imageStream.Close();
    return false;
}
share|improve this answer
    
This code doesn't dispose ImageStream if IsValidImage returns false. –  Joe Oct 17 '08 at 7:22
    
Thank you very much. I fixed the bug. –  SemiColon Oct 17 '08 at 8:10
    
Not quite. If imageStream.Read throws an exception, you still don't close it. Best to put a using statement around the stream instantiation. –  Joe Oct 17 '08 at 16:17
5  
@Joe I must disagree. He should not be closing or disposing of the stream in this function. This function didn't create the stream, and so should not perform unexpected behaviours. Also.. In case of success, Image.FromStream will consume the stream (which might be readonly, and can't be reset) meaning that a subsequent read of the stream later would fail since the stream had already been consumed. Also, upon success the image is loaded (very costly) and then disposed of immediately. If this method return true, it's likely the caller will load the image on the next line. So that's double work. –  Troy Howard Oct 23 '09 at 1:12
    
@Troy, I agree. It would be better for this method to take a byte array or some similar object that isn't affected by the method, especially since it's static. –  Kenneth Posey Jun 19 '12 at 19:40

You can do a rough typing by sniffing the header.

This means that each file format you implement will need to have a identifiable header...

JPEG: First 4 bytes are FF D8 FF E0 (actually just the first two bytes would do it for non jfif jpeg, more info here).

GIF: First 6 bytes are either "GIF87a" or "GIF89a" (more info here)

PNG: First 8 bytes are: 89 50 4E 47 0D 0A 1A 0A (more info here)

TIFF: First 4 bytes are: II42 or MM42 (more info here)

etc... you can find header/format information for just about any graphics format you care about and add to the things it handles as needed. What this won't do, is tell you if the file is a valid version of that type, but it will give you a hint about "image not image?". It could still be a corrupt or incomplete image, and thus crash when opening, so a try catch around the .FromFile call is still needed.

share|improve this answer
4  
hmm.. four people answered while I was typing that and collecting links. Busy place. –  Troy Howard Oct 16 '08 at 23:48

This should do the trick - you don't have to read raw bytes out of the header:

using(Image test = Image.FromFile(filePath))
{
    bool isJpeg = (test.RawFormat.Equals(ImageFormat.Jpeg));
}

Of course, you should trap the OutOfMemoryException too, which will save you if the file isn't an image at all.

And, ImageFormat has pre-set items for all the other major image types that GDI+ supports.

Note, you must use .Equals() and not == on ImageFormat objects (it is not an enumeration) because the operator == isn't overloaded to call the Equals method.

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A method that supports Tiff and Jpeg also

private bool IsValidImage(string filename)
{
    Stream imageStream = null;
    try
    {
        imageStream = new FileStream(filename, FileMode.Open);

        if (imageStream.Length > 0)
        {
            byte[] header = new byte[30]; // Change size if needed.
            string[] imageHeaders = new[]
            {
                "BM",       // BMP
                "GIF",      // GIF
                Encoding.ASCII.GetString(new byte[]{137, 80, 78, 71}),// PNG
                "MM\x00\x2a", // TIFF
                "II\x2a\x00" // TIFF
            };

            imageStream.Read(header, 0, header.Length);

            bool isImageHeader = imageHeaders.Count(str => Encoding.ASCII.GetString(header).StartsWith(str)) > 0;
            if (imageStream != null)
            {
                imageStream.Close();
                imageStream.Dispose();
                imageStream = null;
            }

            if (isImageHeader == false)
            {
                //Verify if is jpeg
                using (BinaryReader br = new BinaryReader(File.Open(filename, FileMode.Open)))
                {
                    UInt16 soi = br.ReadUInt16();  // Start of Image (SOI) marker (FFD8)
                    UInt16 jfif = br.ReadUInt16(); // JFIF marker

                    return soi == 0xd8ff && (jfif == 0xe0ff || jfif == 57855);
                }
            }

            return isImageHeader;
        }

        return false;
    }
    catch { return false; }
    finally
    {
        if (imageStream != null)
        {
            imageStream.Close();
            imageStream.Dispose();
        }
    }
}
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I would create a method like:

Image openImage(string filename);

in which I handle the exception. If the returned value is Null, there is an invalid file name / type.

share|improve this answer
    
LOL, I must've been writing that as a comment when you posted this. I agree with this answer, it's simple enough to get the job done. –  Jason Bunting Oct 16 '08 at 23:42
    
This method is just kind of wrong. You should not control program flow using exceptions. Also.. The exceptions returned from that particular call can be very misleading and ambiguous. –  Troy Howard Oct 23 '09 at 1:02
    
I don't see what's wrong with this. The person who wrote openImage chose to throw an exception if the image is invalid instead of providing a return value. So it seems to me that catching and handling the exception is the way they intended for you to deal with that situation. –  pilavdzice Apr 25 '12 at 17:43

I took Semicolon's answer and converted to VB:

Private Function IsValidImage(imageStream As System.IO.Stream) As Boolean

            If (imageStream.Length = 0) Then
                isvalidimage = False
                Exit Function
            End If

            Dim pngByte() As Byte = New Byte() {137, 80, 78, 71}
            Dim pngHeader As String = System.Text.Encoding.ASCII.GetString(pngByte)

            Dim jpgByte() As Byte = New Byte() {255, 216}
            Dim jpgHeader As String = System.Text.Encoding.ASCII.GetString(jpgByte)

            Dim bmpHeader As String = "BM"
            Dim gifHeader As String = "GIF"

            Dim header(3) As Byte

            Dim imageHeaders As String() = New String() {jpgHeader, bmpHeader, gifHeader, pngHeader}
            imageStream.Read(header, 0, header.Length)

            Dim isImageHeader As Boolean = imageHeaders.Count(Function(str) System.Text.Encoding.ASCII.GetString(header).StartsWith(str)) > 0

            If (isImageHeader) Then
                Try
                    System.Drawing.Image.FromStream(imageStream).Dispose()
                    imageStream.Close()
                    IsValidImage = True
                    Exit Function
                Catch ex As Exception
                    System.Diagnostics.Debug.WriteLine("Not an image")
                End Try
            Else
                System.Diagnostics.Debug.WriteLine("Not an image")
            End If

            imageStream.Close()
            IsValidImage = False
        End Function
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You could read the first few bytes of the Stream and compare them to the magic header bytes for JPEG.

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in case yo need that data read for other operations and/or for other filetypes (PSD for example), later on, then using the Image.FromStream function is not necessarily a good ideea.

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1 - Get File extension from the FileUpload control:

string fileExtension = Path.GetExtension(FileUpload1.PostedFile.FileName.ToString());

2 - Chek extension in an array of extensions:

public bool chkValidExtension(string ext)
{
    string[] PosterAllowedExtensions = new string[] { ".gif", ".jpeg", ".jpg", ".png", ".GIF", ".JPEG", ".JPG", ".PNG" };
      for (int i = 0; i < PosterAllowedExtensions.Length; i++)
        {
                if (ext == PosterAllowedExtensions[i])
                    return true;
        }
    return false;
}
share|improve this answer
    
OP specifically says that extension is not something they want to rely on –  G. Stoynev Dec 20 '13 at 19:46

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