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I'm trying to figure out how to round a monetary amount upwards to the nearest 5 cents. The following shows my expected results

1.03     => 1.05
1.051    => 1.10
1.05     => 1.05
1.900001 => 1.10

I need the result to be have a precision of 2 (as shown above).

Update

Following the advice below, the best I could do is this

    BigDecimal amount = new BigDecimal(990.49)

    // To round to the nearest .05, multiply by 20, round to the nearest integer, then divide by 20
   def result =  new BigDecimal(Math.ceil(amount.doubleValue() * 20) / 20)
   result.setScale(2, RoundingMode.HALF_UP)

I'm not convinced this is 100% kosher - I'm concerned precision could be lost when converting to and from doubles. However, it's the best I've come up with so far and seems to work.

Thanks, Don

share|improve this question
    
By definition, you're losing precision anyway since you're rounding. I don't think you have too much to worry about with regard to precision loss. –  Tenner Jan 21 '10 at 20:52
2  
As an aside, if you are worried about the precision, then you should create your BigDecimals using the String constructor, not the double constructor. –  Paul Wagland Jan 23 '10 at 21:26
    
See @marcolopes answer for how to do it with BigDecimal without using doubleValue(). –  robinst May 16 '13 at 12:40

7 Answers 7

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can use plain double to do this.

double amount = 990.49;
double rounded = ((double) (long) (amount * 20 + 0.5)) / 20;

EDIT: for negative numbers you need to subtract 0.5

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docs.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/java/nutsandbolts/… "As mentioned above, this data type [double] should never be used for precise values, such as currency." –  daemonl Jul 22 '13 at 0:12
    
@daemonl A good quote, except that most trading systems use double or long, especially those using C++. –  Peter Lawrey Jul 22 '13 at 6:52

I'd try multiplying by 20, rounding to the nearest integer, then dividing by 20. It's a hack, but should get you the right answer.

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Here are a couple of very simple methods in c# I wrote to always round up or down to any value passed.

public static Double RoundUpToNearest(Double passednumber, Double roundto)
    {

        // 105.5 up to nearest 1 = 106
        // 105.5 up to nearest 10 = 110
        // 105.5 up to nearest 7 = 112
        // 105.5 up to nearest 100 = 200
        // 105.5 up to nearest 0.2 = 105.6
        // 105.5 up to nearest 0.3 = 105.6

        //if no rounto then just pass original number back
        if (roundto == 0)
        {
            return passednumber;
        }
        else
        {
            return Math.Ceiling(passednumber / roundto) * roundto;
        }
    }
    public static Double RoundDownToNearest(Double passednumber, Double roundto)
    {

        // 105.5 down to nearest 1 = 105
        // 105.5 down to nearest 10 = 100
        // 105.5 down to nearest 7 = 105
        // 105.5 down to nearest 100 = 100
        // 105.5 down to nearest 0.2 = 105.4
        // 105.5 down to nearest 0.3 = 105.3

        //if no rounto then just pass original number back
        if (roundto == 0)
        {
            return passednumber;
        }
        else
        {
            return Math.Floor(passednumber / roundto) * roundto;
        }
    }
share|improve this answer
    
Neat - I like it. –  Ryan Feb 23 '12 at 9:21

Using BigDecimal without any doubles (improved on the answer from marcolopes):

public static BigDecimal round(BigDecimal value, BigDecimal increment,
                               RoundingMode roundingMode) {
    if (increment.signum() == 0) {
        // 0 increment does not make much sense, but prevent division by 0
        return value;
    } else {
        BigDecimal divided = value.divide(increment, 0, roundingMode);
        BigDecimal result = divided.multiply(increment);
        return result;
    }
}

The rounding mode is e.g. RoundingMode.HALF_UP. For your examples, you actually want RoundingMode.UP (bd is a helper which just returns new BigDecimal(input)):

assertEquals(bd("1.05"), round(bd("1.03"), bd("0.05"), RoundingMode.UP));
assertEquals(bd("1.10"), round(bd("1.051"), bd("0.05"), RoundingMode.UP));
assertEquals(bd("1.05"), round(bd("1.05"), bd("0.05"), RoundingMode.UP));
assertEquals(bd("1.95"), round(bd("1.900001"), bd("0.05"), RoundingMode.UP));

Also note that there is a mistake in your last example (rounding 1.900001 to 1.10).

share|improve this answer
    
Clearly the best answer. Please upvote so it's ranked higher than those hacky solutions that use floating point. –  David Easley Jun 24 at 16:00

I wrote this in Java a few years ago:

/**
 * Rounds the number to the nearest<br>
 * Numbers can be with or without decimals<br>
 * Example: 123.56, 2.50 = 122.50
 *
 */
public static BigDecimal round(BigDecimal value, BigDecimal rounding){
    /*
     * HALF_UP
     * Rounding mode to round towards "nearest neighbor" unless both neighbors
     * are equidistant, in which case round up.
     * Behaves as for RoundingMode.UP if the discarded fraction is >= 0.5;
     * otherwise, behaves as for RoundingMode.DOWN.
     * Note that this is the rounding mode commonly taught at school.
     */
    return rounding.doubleValue()==0 ? value :
        (value.divide(rounding,0,RoundingMode.HALF_UP)).multiply(rounding);

}
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I think using rounding.signum() == 0 would be a better test for 0 instead of rounding.doubleValue() == 0. Apart from that, this solution is good. –  robinst May 16 '13 at 12:39

Based on your edit, another possible solution would be:

BigDecimal twenty = new BigDecimal(20);
BigDecimal amount = new BigDecimal(990.49)

// To round to the nearest .05, multiply by 20, round to the nearest integer, then divide by 20
BigDecimal result =  new BigDecimal(amount.multiply(twenty)
                                          .add(new BigDecimal("0.5"))
                                          .toBigInteger()).divide(twenty);

This has the advantage, of being guaranteed not to lose precision, although it could potentially be slower of course...

And the scala test log:

scala> var twenty = new java.math.BigDecimal(20) 
twenty: java.math.BigDecimal = 20

scala> var amount = new java.math.BigDecimal("990.49");
amount: java.math.BigDecimal = 990.49

scala> new BigDecimal(amount.multiply(twenty).add(new BigDecimal("0.5")).toBigInteger()).divide(twenty)
res31: java.math.BigDecimal = 990.5
share|improve this answer

Tom has the right idea, but you need to use BigDecimal methods, since you ostensibly are using BigDecimal because your values are not amenable to a primitive datatype. Something like:

BigDecimal num = new BigDecimal(0.23);
BigDecimal twenty = new BigDecimal(20);
//Might want to use RoundingMode.UP instead,
//depending on desired behavior for negative values of num.
BigDecimal numTimesTwenty = num.multiply(twenty, new MathContext(0, RoundingMode.CEILING)); 
BigDecimal numRoundedUpToNearestFiveCents
  = numTimesTwenty.divide(twenty, new MathContext(2, RoundingMode.UNNECESSARY));
share|improve this answer
    
This throws an exception Exception thrown: Rounding necessary java.lang.ArithmeticException: Rounding necessary –  Dónal Jan 21 '10 at 3:38

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