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#include <iostream>
#include <cmath>

using namespace std;
bool prime(int n);

int main()
{
    double i;

    while (true)
    {
        cout << "Enter a number that isn't 0: ";
        cin >> i;
            if ( i == 0)
                break;
            if(prime(i))
                cout << i << " is prime" << endl;
            else
                cout << i << " is not prime." << endl;
    }
    system ("Pause");
    return 0;
}

bool prime (int n)
{
    int i;
    double sqrt_of_n = sqrt(double (n));
    for (i = 2; i <= sqrt_of_n; i++)
        {
            if (int(n) % 1 == 0)
            return false;
        }
    return true;
}

Everytime I run the program, if I input 7, I get that 7 isn't prime. Can someone help me figure out where I messed up?

I have tried changing between double and int for i and n.

If I input 3, it shows prime.

The problem is that it's showing some prime numbers as not prime.

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closed as off-topic by Ben Voigt, woolstar, Casey, Andrew Medico, Adi Inbar Jan 11 '14 at 23:01

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "This question was caused by a problem that can no longer be reproduced or a simple typographical error. While similar questions may be on-topic here, this one was resolved in a manner unlikely to help future readers. This can often be avoided by identifying and closely inspecting the shortest program necessary to reproduce the problem before posting." – Ben Voigt, woolstar, Casey, Andrew Medico, Adi Inbar
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
instead of getting the square root of n. you can have your for loop condition as i*i <= n, it is the same as i <= sqrt_of_n –  Mhd.Tahawi Jan 11 '14 at 20:47

1 Answer 1

The body of your for loop doesn't use i at all.

In particular, n % 1 is always zero, for any integral n.

Presumably you want to know whether n is divisible by i, but accidentally checked if n is divisible by 1.

You could easily have discovered this mistake yourself by single-stepping in a debugger, and making the various subexpressions into "watch expressions".

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I copied the example straight from a book called C++ without fear. This is how the book shows to do it. How do I remedy this error? –  user3175649 Jan 11 '14 at 20:46
1  
@user3175649 If this does come from a book, take another book... –  Johan Jan 11 '14 at 20:47
1  
@user3175649: I thought you might have copied someone else's code. At some point, an i was transcribed as 1, because the two look very similar. I don't not know whether you made the error or it occurred during the prepublication process. Think about what I said, I'm not going to directly give you the answer, but there are plenty of clues here. –  Ben Voigt Jan 11 '14 at 20:48
    
OH! If I replace the 1 in the for loop with i, it fixes it. My bad! Thanks :) –  user3175649 Jan 11 '14 at 20:48
1  
@user3175649: take a look here: stackoverflow.com/questions/388242/… –  Mhd.Tahawi Jan 11 '14 at 20:49

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