Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Following is out from python shell:

>>> import locale
>>> locale.setlocale(locale.LC_ALL, '')
'English_United States.1252'
>>> c = [u'9', u'9', u'54', u'51', u'48', u'48', u'47', u'46', u'46', u'45', u'44', u'44', u'43', u'43', u'43', u'42', u'42', u'41', u'41', u'41', u'41', u'41', u'40', u'38', u'38', u'38', u'38', u'37', u'37', u'37', u'36', u'36', u'36', u'36', u'35', u'35', u'35', u'35', u'35', u'35', u'35', u'34', u'34', u'33', u'33', u'33', u'33', u'33', u'32', u'32', u'32', u'31', u'31', u'31', u'30', u'30', u'29', u'29', u'29', u'29', u'29', u'29', u'29', u'26', u'26', u'25', u'25', u'25', u'24', u'24', u'24', u'24', u'23', u'2', u'17', u'16', u'12', u'1', u'1', u'1', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0']
>>> sorted(c,locale.strcoll)
[u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'1', u'1', u'1', u'12', u'16', u'17', u'2', u'23', u'24', u'24', u'24', u'24', u'25', u'25', u'25', u'26', u'26', u'29', u'29', u'29', u'29', u'29', u'29', u'29', u'30', u'30', u'31', u'31', u'31', u'32', u'32', u'32', u'33', u'33', u'33', u'33', u'33', u'34', u'34', u'35', u'35', u'35', u'35', u'35', u'35', u'35', u'36', u'36', u'36', u'36', u'37', u'37', u'37', u'38', u'38', u'38', u'38', u'40', u'41', u'41', u'41', u'41', u'41', u'42', u'42', u'43', u'43', u'43', u'44', u'44', u'45', u'46', u'46', u'47', u'48', u'48', u'51', u'54', u'9', u'9']

Output is not sorted . There is a u'16', u'17', u'2' and then u'23'.

Don't know what is going on here. Can anyone please help?

share|improve this question
1  
Search for "natural sort". –  Mark Ransom Jan 11 at 22:30
    
Output is perfectly sorted. In lexicographical order. –  Martijn Pieters Jan 11 at 22:40
    
c.sort(key=int) –  Omid Raha Jan 11 at 22:40

6 Answers 6

up vote 3 down vote accepted

It's fascinating how much is packed into the elegant and simple-looking sorted(). From the docs, http://docs.python.org/2/library/functions.html#sorted :

key specifies a function of one argument that is used to extract a comparison key from each list element: key=str.lower. The default value is None (compare the elements directly).

So one can cast the element in the list as such while calling sorted():

>>> c = [u'9', u'9', u'54', u'51', u'48', u'48', u'47', u'46', u'46', u'45', u'44', u'44', u'43', u'43', u'43', u'42', u'42', u'41', u'41', u'41', u'41', u'41', u'40', u'38', u'38', u'38', u'38', u'37', u'37', u'37', u'36', u'36', u'36', u'36', u'35', u'35', u'35', u'35', u'35', u'35', u'35', u'34', u'34', u'33', u'33', u'33', u'33', u'33', u'32', u'32', u'32', u'31', u'31', u'31', u'30', u'30', u'29', u'29', u'29', u'29', u'29', u'29', u'29', u'26', u'26', u'25', u'25', u'25', u'24', u'24', u'24', u'24', u'23', u'2', u'17', u'16', u'12', u'1', u'1', u'1', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0']
>>> sorted(c, key=int)
[u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'1', u'1', u'1', u'2', u'9', u'9', u'12', u'16', u'17', u'23', u'24', u'24', u'24', u'24', u'25', u'25', u'25', u'26', u'26', u'29', u'29', u'29', u'29', u'29', u'29', u'29', u'30', u'30', u'31', u'31', u'31', u'32', u'32', u'32', u'33', u'33', u'33', u'33', u'33', u'34', u'34', u'35', u'35', u'35', u'35', u'35', u'35', u'35', u'36', u'36', u'36', u'36', u'37', u'37', u'37', u'38', u'38', u'38', u'38', u'40', u'41', u'41', u'41', u'41', u'41', u'42', u'42', u'43', u'43', u'43', u'44', u'44', u'45', u'46', u'46', u'47', u'48', u'48', u'51', u'54']

Alternatively, there is a natsort library, https://pypi.python.org/pypi/natsort,

>>> import natsort
>>> c = [u'9', u'9', u'54', u'51', u'48', u'48', u'47', u'46', u'46', u'45', u'44', u'44', u'43', u'43', u'43', u'42', u'42', u'41', u'41', u'41', u'41', u'41', u'40', u'38', u'38', u'38', u'38', u'37', u'37', u'37', u'36', u'36', u'36', u'36', u'35', u'35', u'35', u'35', u'35', u'35', u'35', u'34', u'34', u'33', u'33', u'33', u'33', u'33', u'32', u'32', u'32', u'31', u'31', u'31', u'30', u'30', u'29', u'29', u'29', u'29', u'29', u'29', u'29', u'26', u'26', u'25', u'25', u'25', u'24', u'24', u'24', u'24', u'23', u'2', u'17', u'16', u'12', u'1', u'1', u'1', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0']
>>> natsort.natsorted(c)
[u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'0', u'1', u'1', u'1', u'2', u'9', u'9', u'12', u'16', u'17', u'23', u'24', u'24', u'24', u'24', u'25', u'25', u'25', u'26', u'26', u'29', u'29', u'29', u'29', u'29', u'29', u'29', u'30', u'30', u'31', u'31', u'31', u'32', u'32', u'32', u'33', u'33', u'33', u'33', u'33', u'34', u'34', u'35', u'35', u'35', u'35', u'35', u'35', u'35', u'36', u'36', u'36', u'36', u'37', u'37', u'37', u'38', u'38', u'38', u'38', u'40', u'41', u'41', u'41', u'41', u'41', u'42', u'42', u'43', u'43', u'43', u'44', u'44', u'45', u'46', u'46', u'47', u'48', u'48', u'51', u'54']

especially when your elements contains some nondigit strings.

>>> x = ['foo12', 'foo1', 'foo2','foo24']
>>> natsort.natsorted(x)
['foo1', 'foo2', 'foo12', 'foo24']
share|improve this answer
    
I just added an answer about natsort, but I'll delete mine and upvote yours instead. –  SethMMorton Jan 12 at 0:31
    
You don't need the key=lambda y: y.lower() in this example, because there are only numbers in the string. Just natsort.natsorted(c) works. –  SethMMorton Jan 12 at 0:32

You need to sort as numbers, not as text. Try this:

myList.sort(key=int)

The int function is run in each element before it sorts, forcing it to sort the strings as integer numbers.

share|improve this answer
    
Since the OP is using sorted(): sorted(c, key=int) would be closer to what is needed here. –  Martijn Pieters Jan 11 at 22:52
1  
@MartijnPieters My answer as comment was before that, but ... –  Omid Raha Jan 11 at 23:05
    
@OmidRaha: You commented, not answered. –  Martijn Pieters Jan 11 at 23:06
    
@OmidRaha, I'm pretty sure I saw this answer before I saw your comment. –  Mark Ransom Jan 12 at 2:23

Strings are sorted in a lexicographic order. The output is expected when you know that this is how the sort function works.

It appears that what you are looking for is a natural sort. I would suggest taking a look at the natsort package.

Alternatively you could implement your own comparison operation for the sort.

share|improve this answer

Presumably, you want them sorted in numerical order. You can try something like this. c is your list of strings from before. You have two options, first:

sorted_c=sorted(c, key=float)

Without the key function, python sorts those numbers as strings. Since '10' is alphabetically before '7' (it starts with a 1, after all), the sort function will put it earlier in the list.

share|improve this answer

You need a double coversion:

map(unicode, sorted(map(int, c)))
share|improve this answer
1  
No, you don't. Not with a key function argument to sorted() and list.sort(). –  Martijn Pieters Jan 11 at 22:42

They are strings. Strings are sorted alphabetically. 16, 17, 2, 23 is sorted correctly for strings.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.