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I prepare a numpy matrix then use matplotlib to plot the matrix, such as:

>>> import numpy
>>> import matplotlib.pylab as plt
>>> m = [[0.0, 1.47, 2.43, 3.44, 1.08, 2.83, 1.08, 2.13, 2.11, 3.7], [1.47, 0.0, 1.5,     2.39, 2.11, 2.4, 2.11, 1.1, 1.1, 3.21], [2.43, 1.5, 0.0, 1.22, 2.69, 1.33, 3.39, 2.15, 2.12, 1.87], [3.44, 2.39, 1.22, 0.0, 3.45, 2.22, 4.34, 2.54, 3.04, 2.28], [1.08, 2.11, 2.69, 3.45, 0.0, 3.13, 1.76, 2.46, 3.02, 3.85], [2.83, 2.4, 1.33, 2.22, 3.13, 0.0, 3.83, 3.32, 2.73, 0.95], [1.08, 2.11, 3.39, 4.34, 1.76, 3.83, 0.0, 2.47, 2.44, 4.74], [2.13, 1.1, 2.15, 2.54, 2.46, 3.32, 2.47, 0.0, 1.78, 4.01], [2.11, 1.1, 2.12, 3.04, 3.02, 2.73, 2.44, 1.78, 0.0, 3.57], [3.7, 3.21, 1.87, 2.28, 3.85, 0.95, 4.74, 4.01, 3.57, 0.0]]
>>> matrix = numpy.matrix(m)
>>> matrix
matrix([
    [ 0.  ,  1.47,  2.43,  3.44,  1.08,  2.83,  1.08,  2.13,  2.11, 3.7 ],
    [ 1.47,  0.  ,  1.5 ,  2.39,  2.11,  2.4 ,  2.11,  1.1 ,  1.1 , 3.21],
    [ 2.43,  1.5 ,  0.  ,  1.22,  2.69,  1.33,  3.39,  2.15,  2.12, 1.87],
    [ 3.44,  2.39,  1.22,  0.  ,  3.45,  2.22,  4.34,  2.54,  3.04, 2.28],
    [ 1.08,  2.11,  2.69,  3.45,  0.  ,  3.13,  1.76,  2.46,  3.02, 3.85],
    [ 2.83,  2.4 ,  1.33,  2.22,  3.13,  0.  ,  3.83,  3.32,  2.73, 0.95],
    [ 1.08,  2.11,  3.39,  4.34,  1.76,  3.83,  0.  ,  2.47,  2.44, 4.74],
    [ 2.13,  1.1 ,  2.15,  2.54,  2.46,  3.32,  2.47,  0.  ,  1.78, 4.01],
    [ 2.11,  1.1 ,  2.12,  3.04,  3.02,  2.73,  2.44,  1.78,  0.  , 3.57],
    [ 3.7 ,  3.21,  1.87,  2.28,  3.85,  0.95,  4.74,  4.01,  3.57, 0.  ]
])
>>> fig = plt.figure()
>>> ax = fig.add_subplot(1,1,1)
>>> ax.set_aspect('equal')
>>> plt.imshow(matrix, interpolation='nearest', cmap=plt.cm.ocean)
>>> plt.colorbar()
>>> plt.show()

The plot shows like this:

enter image description here

This is fine, except for the fact that I would like my axes to go from 1-10, rather than 0-9 (derived from python's 0 indexing)

Is there a simple way to do this?

Many thanks!!

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Note that x-axis and y-axis are in the range [-0.5, 9.5] –  Christian Jan 12 at 4:01

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You can use the extent optional parameter to the plt.imshow() function, which is documented here. Like this:

#All the stuff earlier in the program
plt.imshow(matrix, interpolation='nearest', cmap=plt.cm.ocean, extent=(0.5,10.5,0.5,10.5))
plt.colorbar()
plt.show()

For a matrix with an arbitrary shape, you could change this code to something like this:

#All the stuff earlier in the program
plt.imshow(matrix, interpolation='nearest', cmap=plt.cm.ocean,
    extent=(0.5,numpy.shape(matrix)[0]+0.5,0.5,numpy.shape(matrix)[1]+0.5))
plt.colorbar()
plt.show()

This produces a plot that looks like this:

Plot output

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you! Are there any advantages to using extent, rather than Christian's method below? –  GarethPrice Jan 12 at 4:30
1  
@GarethPrice: I suppose the specific way I have it set up would work better if you had, say, a 1000x1000 matrix, as it lets numpy pick how the tics should be spaced. Other than that they're pretty much the same, and Christian's method wouldn't have to be modified much to make it work like that too. –  Dan Jan 12 at 4:36
1  
I think it would always be preferrable to control something like this from the plot command. The other method requires messing around with axis objects and minding when you show etc. If you know in advance that you want the axes a certain way, better to make them right to start with. –  mmdanziger Jan 13 at 14:38

To get the desired output add these lines after your code, but before plt.show():

...
labels = [0, 1, 3, 5, 7, 9]
ax.set_xticklabels(labels)
plt.show()

Note that x-axis and y-axis are in the range [-0.5, 9.5] not int [0, 9]

Edit:

To do it in a more flexible way (in fact, another way of the showed above):

labels = range(0, len(m[0]))
plt.xticks(labels)
plt.show()

Output:

enter image description here

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you! Likewise with Dan, are there any advantages to doing it this way, rather than using extent?? –  GarethPrice Jan 12 at 4:30

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