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Suppose there are two users who have created two different jobs on the Jenkins server. Each user can only access, configure and run his own job. On each job, they are going to execute a remote ssh command. So I have configured two "SSH remote hosts" through "Manage Jenkins > Configure System > SSH remote hosts" (the SSH plugin is installed). Now in the build section of each job, it's possible to select one of these two ssh connections to execute a remote command. My question is, how to restrict access of users to these ssh connections. I want each user to only be able to access his own SSH connection, so that they cannot execute commands on the remote computers they should not have access to.

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If you're using Jenkins as an SSH execution manager, you might find Rundeck more suitable. It's much simpler in Rundeck to create multiple projects, each with their own credentials, users and machines to manage. Jenkins can also be configured to do this but you're fighting the tool. Jenkins was designed to centrally manage build software processes. –  Mark O'Connor Jan 12 '14 at 23:10
    
@MarkO'Connor I am using Jenkins to execute automatic test scripts for projects. This is how it works: I bind a job to the SVN address of a development project, Jenkins checkouts that address frequently to see if the source code of project has changed, if so, then build steps are run. Through these build steps, I run test scripts on remote machines and if any of these tests fail, the Jenkins job becomes cloudy meaning there is something wrong in the source code of project. Do you think I can use Rundeck to achieve the same objective? –  Meysam Jan 13 '14 at 3:08
    
THat sounds like a fairly typical Jenkins scenario. Setup two jobs in Jenkins, configure security so that users are isolated, then ensure they cannot edit the jobs. This makes things simpler to setup. Finally there is always the option of running two instances of Jenkins :-) –  Mark O'Connor Jan 13 '14 at 10:09

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