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Since I heard that being a lazy programmer is a virtue, I delayed the creation of my git-flow feature branch like this:

* dca9fae - Merge branch 'feature/refactor' into develop
|\
| * 9ca4bc3 - Delivery task
| * 8b2e03f - rf up Repo DSL attributes
|/
* e1ddb98 - access to self.views made private
* 0ab6725 - extract Repo#aggregate
* 9bf6ca0 - Merge branch 'feature/mapper'

I want to clean my commit history by moving up two of my refactoring commits, and get something like this:

* dca9fae - Merge branch 'feature/refactor' into develop
|\
| * 9ca4bc3 - Delivery task
| * 8b2e03f - rf up Repo DSL attributes
| * e1ddb98 - access to self.views made private
| * 0ab6725 - extract Repo#aggregate
|/
* 9bf6ca0 - Merge branch 'feature/mapper'

My original though to edit my commit history was this:

git rebase -i 9bf6ca0

Sadly that destroyed my nice non-fast-forward merge bubble and flattened the whole thing into something like this:

* dca9fae - Merge branch 'feature/refactor' into develop
* 9ca4bc3 - Delivery task
* 8b2e03f - rf up Repo DSL attributes
* e1ddb98 - access to self.views made private
* 0ab6725 - extract Repo#aggregate
* 9bf6ca0 - Merge branch 'feature/mapper'

How can I make git rebase to preserve my non-fast-forward merges?

I am interested not only in how to obtain my second example starting from the first example, but also starting from the third one.

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Please add --decorate to your git log commands generating you outputs. –  michas Jan 12 at 13:24
    
Is feature/refacor a local or remote branch? Please add the relevant part from git branch -avv. –  michas Jan 12 at 13:36
    
The commit is from the standard git-flow configuration. They were taken from the 'develop' branch with local only branches (otherwise I would not ask for a solution using 'rebase') –  SystematicFrank Jan 12 at 13:42

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Basically you could do it like this:

git reset --hard 9ca4bc3
git merge --no-ff 9bf6ca0

Unfortunately you did tell, where your branches currently point to. Probably what you really want is something like this:

git checkout refactor
git reset --hard 9ca4bc3
git checkout develop
git reset --hard 9bf6ca0
git merge --no-ff refactor

You also did not specify where your upstream branches point to. Watch out not to change any commits already published.


git rebase does not make sense in your case. It just takes your commits and adds them to the new base. In your case the old base seems to be exactly the same as the new base, therefore the result is exactly the same as before. (Only the merge commit is missing.)

share|improve this answer
    
I think you switched versions and meant reset --hard 9bf6ca0 and --no-ff 9ca4bc3, at least, that is what I just did. In any case I was nicely surprised finding out that reset did not delete the future commits after the point I set my HEAD. I guess that would happen after 'git gc' –  SystematicFrank Jan 12 at 13:37
    
So do you mean that rebase cannot create (or even preserve) previous --no-ff merges? –  SystematicFrank Jan 12 at 13:40
    
You did not specify where your branches point to. Therefore it is not clear which branch needs to be set to which commit. git gc will delete commits only if they are unreachable and where not accessed for a few weeks. –  michas Jan 12 at 13:41
    
git rebase will only replay normal commits. You need --preserve-merges to preserve merges. But in your case you have to create a new merge commit, as the current merge commit uses e1ddb98 instead of 9bf6ca0. –  michas Jan 12 at 13:45
1  
Just be careful with --preserve-merges. Depending on what you're rebasing against, it'll rebase the commits brought in by the merge. It's most often not what you want. –  jszakmeister Jan 12 at 14:05

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