Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

How can I access Base class data member in derived class? I want to use docElem data member which has been initialized customizeCSMWindow()constructor in subMenuLists::changeWidget().

class myWidget
{
public :
    QDomElement docElem; 
    QDomDocument *menuOrderXMLFile;
};

class subMenuLists : public QListWidget , public myWidget
{
        Q_OBJECT
 public slots:
        void changeWidget( int index);
};

class customizeCSMwindow : public QDialog , public myWidget
{
    Q_OBJECT
public :
    subMenuLists *menuList;
    customizeCSMwindow(QString);       

}

customizeCSMwindow::customizeCSMwindow(QString fileName)
{
menuOrderXMLFile = new QDomDocument();
file = new QFile(fileName);
QString errorStr;
int errorLine;
int errorColumn;
if(!menuOrderXMLFile->setContent(file, false , &errorStr, &errorLine,
                             &errorColumn))
   std::cout<<"not found \n";
 else
       docElem = menuOrderXMLFile->documentElement();
}

void subMenuLists::changeWidget(int index)
{
    clear();
// How to access that docElem here??
}

How to access the docElem in void subMenuLists::changeWidget() function?

EDIT :

I'd like to explain my question, see if you can help me. What I want is that, to get the value of docElem which is getting assigned in cusomizeCSMWidnow construtor, in subMenuList::changeWidget() function. As of now, when I access docElem inside changeWidget function , it gives null/uninitialized value.

share|improve this question
    
What is Q_OBJECT? BTW - Not a good idea to have public data members. Better to have getters and setters –  Ed Heal Jan 12 at 15:15
3  
Just use it: docElem.doWhatever();?? –  πάντα ῥεῖ Jan 12 at 15:15
    
Access to docElem is allowed, but the thing is I'm not getting the value of docElem which has be assigned to it in the constructor of customizeCSMWindow. Am I missing something? –  user3187568 Jan 12 at 16:48
    
@EdHeal Please ignore Q_OBJECT thing. I'd like to explain my question, see if you can help me. What I want is that, to get the value of docElem which is getting assigned in cusomizeCSMWidnow construtor in subMenuList::changeWidget() function. As of now, when I access docElem inside changeWidget function , it gives null/uninitialized value. –  user3187568 Jan 12 at 17:01
    
You are missing something. What do you really set and what do you access?! See my answer! –  Tobias Jan 12 at 18:09

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The class customizeCSMwindow is something like a container for elements of type subMenuLists. The container and the elements each have members docElem. You try to access in a subMenuLists the member docElem of the container customizeCSMwindow.

That cannot work directly. Either, give the elements of the container a pointer to the container or give the pointer to the container in the call of subMenuLists::changeWidget.

Example explaining the pointer to the container in the elements:

#include <string>
#include <iostream>

class myWidget
{
public :
    std::string docElem;
};

class customizeCSMwindow;

class subMenuLists : public myWidget
{
    customizeCSMwindow* m_pContainer; // Pointer to the container
public:
    subMenuLists(customizeCSMwindow* pContainer) :
        m_pContainer(pContainer)
    {}
    void changeWidget(int index);
};

class customizeCSMwindow : public myWidget
{
public:
    subMenuLists *menuList; // This pointer makes customizeCSMwindow to a container.
    customizeCSMwindow();
    void setMenuList(subMenuLists* ml) {
        menuList = ml;
    }
};

customizeCSMwindow::customizeCSMwindow() // Here we set docElem of the **container**.
{
    docElem = " docElem in customizeCSMwindow";
}

void subMenuLists::changeWidget(int index) // In the **element** we want to access the  docElem of the **container**
{
    // How to access that docElem here??
    std::cout << "\nIn changeWidget:" << m_pContainer->docElem << "\n";
}

int main() {
    customizeCSMwindow job;
    subMenuLists menu(&job);

    job.setMenuList(&menu);

    menu.changeWidget(0);
}

In the comments you asked: "One more thing, does this design look good? Or can you suggest any better way to have same variable i.e. docElem accessible in two different class?"

This strongly depends on the objective. If there can be multiple elements in menuList then the raw pointer should be avoided. You should use a std::vector of std::shared_ptr instead. If this is just some kind of pointer-implementation pimpl (see Scott Meyers effective c++) then the raw pointer can be fine.

There is just too much to say about good implementations. You need to read books about that (e.g., the standard book [Stroustrup: C++] or [Scott Meyers: Effective C++] or good references you find easily via google in discussions).

There follows just one possible implementation for multiple elements in menuList.

#include <string>
#include <iostream>
#include <stdexcept> // for std::out_of_range
#include <memory> // for std::shared_ptr
#include <vector>

class myWidget
{
public :
    std::string docElem;
};

class customizeCSMwindow;

class subMenuLists : public myWidget
{
    customizeCSMwindow* m_pContainer; // Pointer to the container

    /* The private constructor only allows the friend customizeCSMwindow to
       construct elements of subMenuLists. This makes sure that pContainer is right. */
    subMenuLists(customizeCSMwindow* pContainer) :
        m_pContainer(pContainer)
    {}
public:
    void changeWidget(int index);

    friend customizeCSMwindow;
};

class customizeCSMwindow : public myWidget
{
    /* shared_ptr takes care of the deletion of allocated memory for subMenuLists. */
    typedef std::shared_ptr<subMenuLists> pSubMenuLists_t;

    /* Automatically runs the destructors of the elements when menuList is destructed. */
    std::vector<pSubMenuLists_t> menuList; // This pointer makes customizeCSMwindow to a container.
public:
    customizeCSMwindow();

    /* The only and right way to generate new MenuLists. Takes care of the right m_pContainer. */
    void addMenuLists(/*Stuff needed for the construction of an element of type subMenuLists*/) {
        pSubMenuLists_t ml(new subMenuLists(this /* stuff for subMenuLists */));
        menuList.push_back(ml);
    }

    /* One possible interface to make iteration over menuList possible. (There are other ways too.) */
    size_t sizeMenuList() {
        return menuList.size();
    }
    subMenuLists* getMenuListItem(size_t i) throw(std::out_of_range)
    {
        return menuList.at(i).get(); 
    }
};

customizeCSMwindow::customizeCSMwindow() // Here we set docElem of the **container**.
{
    docElem = " docElem in customizeCSMwindow";
}    
void subMenuLists::changeWidget(int index) // In the **element** we want to access the  docElem of the **container**
{
    // How to access that docElem here??
    std::cout << "\nIn changeWidget:" << m_pContainer->docElem << "\n";
}

int main() {
    size_t i;
    customizeCSMwindow job;

    job.addMenuLists();

    for(i=0; i!=job.sizeMenuList(); i++)
        job.getMenuListItem(i)->changeWidget(0);

    return 0;
}

/*
    Local Variables:
    compile-command: "g++ -std=c++11 test3.cc -o a.exe; ./a.exe"
    End:
 */
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks @Tobias , I got the point. One more thing, does this design look good? Or can you suggest any better way to have same variable i.e. docElem accessible in two different class? –  user3187568 Jan 13 at 6:03
    
I'm a newbie in C++/OOPs programming, so I'm wondering if this 'container' thing is standard or not? ps: I Liked this method btw :) –  user3187568 Jan 13 at 8:54
1  
I have edited the answer. The first example in the answer served to show the problem in the simplest way. The second example shows one possible implementation with some measures of protection in it. But, as stated in the answer. Whether or not an implementation has advantages or disadvantages also depends strongly on the objective. –  Tobias Jan 13 at 11:11
    
Thanks @tobias. I need to read those books you have mentioned to understand second solution better. owever, this answer has been a great help. thanks! –  user3187568 Jan 13 at 16:17

A derived class has access to the parent's public and protected members. You just use docElem as if it is a member of subMenuLists.

share|improve this answer
    
Access to docElem is allowed, but the thing is I'm not getting the value of docElem which has be assigned to it in the constructor of customizeCSMWindow. Am I missing something? –  user3187568 Jan 12 at 16:19

The main purpose of inheritance is to make the public (and protected) data and functions from the base class available to the derived class as if the data and functions were declared in the derived class itself.

For example:

class BASE {
public:
   int baseData; //the data you want to use
   void workOnBaseData(){
      baseData = 5;
   }
}; 

class DERIVED : public BASE {
public:
   int someData; //data member of the derived class
   void workOnBaseAndSomeData(){
      someData = baseData; //baseData is already known to DERIVED via inheritance
   }
};

After executing this code one finds that someData = 5! Hope this helped.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.