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This question already has an answer here:

What is the Time Complexity of the delete[] operator?

I mean how is it implemented - does it iterate over all the elements in the array and calls destructor for every element?

Does this operator do the same for primitive types (int, etc.) and user defined types?

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marked as duplicate by Shoe, Andy Prowl, Ben Voigt, bmargulies, fredoverflow Jan 13 '14 at 20:14

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
Awesome question. Love it. – sircodesalot Jan 12 '14 at 16:35
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Voted for reopening! 1. The question has more upvotes than the 'duplicate' 2. @BasileStarynkevitch's answer cites standard documentation and is more sound (IMHO) than the answers in the 'duplicate' – πάντα ῥεῖ Jan 12 '14 at 17:38
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@πάνταῥεῖ then flag to have the answers merged. Reopening this one and trying to get the other closed is too cumbersome. – Kate Gregory Jan 12 '14 at 17:59
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@πάνταῥεῖ I don't agree. Sorry. The number of votes or the "quality" of the answers don't change the rules. Answers should be merged with the dupe question as per standard procedure. – Shoe Jan 12 '14 at 21:10
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@πάνταῥεῖ: The accepted answer to the other question has the advantage of actually correctly answering the question, a virtue not shared by Basile's answer (which makes some true comments and dodges the complexity). – Ben Voigt Jan 12 '14 at 22:02
up vote 32 down vote accepted

::operator delete[] is documented on cplusplus.com (which is sometimes frowned upon) as:

operator delete[] can be called explicitly as a regular function, but in C++, delete[] is an operator with a very specific behavior: An expression with the delete[] operator, first calls the appropriate destructors for each element in the array (if these are of a class type), and then calls function operator delete[] (i.e., this function) to release the storage.

so the destructor is called n times (once for each element), and then the memory freeing "function" is called once.

Notice that each destruction might take a different time (or even complexity) than the others. Generally most destructions are quick, and have the same complexity.... But that won't be the case if each destroyed element is a complex tree or node or graph...

For primitive types like int the fictitious destructor of int is a no-op. The compiler probably would optimize that (if asked).

You should check the real C++11 standard, or at least its late n3337 working draft, which says (thanks to Matteo Italia for pointing that in a comment) in §5.3.5.6 page 110 of n3337:

If the value of the operand of the delete-expression is not a null pointer value, the delete-expression will invoke the destructor (if any) for the object or the elements of the array being deleted. In the case of an array, the elements will be destroyed in order of decreasing address (that is, in reverse order of the completion of their constructor; see 12.6.2)

If you use -and trust enough- GCC 4.8 or better, you could have used the g++ compiler with the -fdump-tree-phiopt or -fdump-tree-all option (beware, they are dumping a lot of files!), or the MELT plugin, to query the intermediate Gimple representation of some example. Or use -S -fverbose-asm to get the assembler code. And you also want to add optimization flags like -O1 or -O2 ...

NB: IMHO, cppreference.com is also an interesting site about C++, see there about delete (as commented by Cubbi)

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+1, but although that quotation is probably accurate, people will surely point out that cplusplus.com is both non-normative and often error-ridden, you should probably replace it with one from the actual standard. – Matteo Italia Jan 12 '14 at 16:37
    
I can't in a few minutes find the exact sentence inside C++11 n3337 ; I'm sure it is there (just a lack of time & motivation from my part) – Basile Starynkevitch Jan 12 '14 at 16:46
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It's at §5.3 ¶6: "[...] the delete-expression will invoke the destructor (if any) for [...] the elements of the array being deleted. In the case of an array, the elements will be destroyed in order of decreasing address (that is, in reverse order of the completion of their constructor; see 12.6.2)." – Matteo Italia Jan 12 '14 at 16:50
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@MatteoItalia: Thanks, improved answer (and cited your help). To be picky it is in §5.3.5.6 – Basile Starynkevitch Jan 12 '14 at 16:54
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well that "is documented on cplusplus.com" just made my hand to instantly move mouse pointer to the "downvote" button, because uhm I maybe could tolerate a reference to this infamous site but saying that it documents something - it's a bit too much. Also all those "very specific behavior" milk-and-water is so... cplusplus. I can't see how it can be useful in this answer, especially when you quote the Standard. – Abyx Jan 12 '14 at 21:50

The implementation of delete and delete[] is composed of two phases:

  1. recursive call to destructors (if any)
  2. memory deallocation for deleted object

Let alone the chain of calls to destructors, whose complexity is essentially governed by you, we are left with how the memory is freed to consider.

The second point is not covered by the C++ specification. So, any compiler suite/OS is free to adopt its own strategy.

A common memory allocation/deallocation strategy is allocating a whole memory page when needed from the OS, then at each new/new[], returning a chunk of the appropriate size, whose length and attributes are then stored inside the page as a header/footer. A corresponding delete/delete[] can be as simple as marking that same chunk as "free", which is clearly O(1).

If the complexity of memory deallocation is O(1), then the complexity of a delete is essentially governed by calls to destructors. The default implementation does (almost) nothing, and it's a O(1) for a single call, thus an overall O(n), where n is the toal number of calls (e.g. if the object being destructed has two fields whose destructor is called, then n = 1 (object) + 2 (o. fields) = 3).

Putting all pieces together: you can arbitrarily increment complexity by performing operations in the destructor (which can be written by you), but you cannot "perform better"¹ than O(n) (n defined in the previous paragraph). The formally correct way to state this is: "the complexity of delete is an Omega(n)".


¹ allow me to be a bit informal on this point

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I believe that the C++ specification does say that the destructor of every element should be called. – Basile Starynkevitch Jan 12 '14 at 16:35
    
@BasileStarynkevitch But this does not aply for fundamental types in which case O(1) is very likely – Paranaix Jan 12 '14 at 16:37
    
@BasileStarynkevitch Yes, I agree. I was more focusing on the part which is not governed by the user itself. Anyway, I fixed the answer. – Stefano Sanfilippo Jan 12 '14 at 16:40
    
I think that complexity of destructors varies is the key here and should really be highlighted. – Ben Voigt Jan 12 '14 at 21:57
    
@BenVoigt I expanded the answer to cover that point :) – Stefano Sanfilippo Jan 13 '14 at 17:02

For class types, the theoretical complexity is O(n). The destructor is called for each element. Of course, it's up to the implementation to adhere to the observable behavior, so if the destructor is a no-op or the behavior is the same as with just marking the whole chunk as freed, the complexity could be just O(1).

For primitive types, the compiler will likely just release the whole chunk of memory at once, thus the complexity O(1).

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Note: given that the complexity of free can vary widely depending on the implementation (compaction of chunks ? thread-caching ?) it is difficult to interpret releasing a block of memory as O(1) without precising what we are counting... – Matthieu M. Jan 12 '14 at 16:45
    
I suppose you meant "types with trivial/non-trivial destructors" rather than primitive/class types. But the complexity of a non-trivial destructor can be very large, as Stefano points out in his answer. – Ben Voigt Jan 12 '14 at 21:59
    
Nope. The complexity of the individual destructors or the underlying heap can dominate. – bmargulies Jan 13 '14 at 2:37

What is the Time Complexity of the delete[] operator?

The amount of the time required is of course implementation defined. However, the operator applies only to the pointer to the 1D array and thus it's O(1).

I mean how is it implemented - does it iterate over all the elements in the array and calls destructor for every element?

Yes.
Provided that it's called only on the exact pointer which is assigned a memory created using new[]. For primitive types there are no user defined destructors.

Does this operator do the same for primitive types (int, etc.) and user defined types?

The comparison is not fair, because primitive types don't have user defined destructor and they cannot be polymorhpic.
For example, delete[] on a polymorphic class is an undefined behavior. i.e.

Base* p1 = new Derived, *p2 = new Derived[2];
delete p1; // ok
delete[] p2;  // bad
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