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I am submitting a form with AJAX:

$("#frmConferenceSettings").on("submit",function(event){
    // disable default click operation
    event.preventDefault();
    // run the AJAX submit
    update_conference_settings();
});

This works fine, however the effect is such that only the submit button will work to submit the form; hitting enter whilst in a form input is disabled by event.preventDefault().

If event.preventDefault() is removed the form submits when the user is in an input field and hits enter, but the AJAX via update_conference_settings() is lost.

How can I allow the form to be submitted by hitting enter, whilst preserving the AJAX?

share|improve this question
up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can try to bind a keypress event and trigger() the handler on your button. Didn't try it but it should work.

UPDATE replace bind with on

   $(document).on('keypress', function(e){
       if(e.which === 13) { // enter
          $('#button_id').trigger('click');
       }
   });
share|improve this answer
    
Good idea. How would I make sure this is only when the use is focused on the form though? – alias51 Jan 12 '14 at 16:52
    
You can test if element has focus with if ($("#elem").is(":focus")) {} – Lorenzo Jan 12 '14 at 16:56
    
This works if I replace $('#button_id').trigger('click'); with update_conference_settings();. Not sure why that would be though? – alias51 Jan 12 '14 at 16:58
1  
.bind is deprecated - use $(element).keypress() or $(element).on('keypress') instead. Putting it on a specific element is also better than on generic document in most cases. – Scimonster Jan 12 '14 at 17:01
    
Although this solution will work, it is kind of a hack. It would be best to listen for a submit event on the form and handle that event appropriately. That way you don't have to have a separate event handler just to mimic a click. IMO this is a little messy. Take a look at this jsfiddle: jsfiddle.net/6mNhX and my answer below. – orourkedd Jan 13 '14 at 11:46

You could only call event.preventDefault() if it's a certain type (i.e. click) event.

share|improve this answer
    
Ok, how would that work? – alias51 Jan 12 '14 at 16:52
    
I don't remember. There's some property of the object telling what type it is... – Scimonster Jan 12 '14 at 16:56

You could remove the event.preventDefault() and put 'return false' after update_conference_settings().

Edit: this is how this should work:

$(function(){
    $("#my-form").submit(function(){

        update_conference_settings(function(){
            //Here you can redirect to new page or do nothing
            //window.location.href = "/submit-page"
            console.log("3) update_conference_settings complete");
        });

        console.log("2) Default form submit cancelled");
        return false;
    });

    function update_conference_settings(callback)
    {
        //Simulate ajax latency
        console.log("1) Init ajax call");
        setTimeout(function(){
            callback();
        }, 250);
    }
});

See this in action here:

http://jsfiddle.net/6mNhX/6/

share|improve this answer
    
That has the same effect as event.preventDefault(); the user can't submit the form with a carriage return. – alias51 Jan 12 '14 at 16:42
    
You need some kind of callback. See the update. – orourkedd Jan 13 '14 at 7:49

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