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For example:

class apple
{
public:
    string name;

    apple::apple(string name) : name(name)
    {
    }
};

If I want to make a bunch of lists each with the type of apple, I thought I could do something like std::list<apple> empire("empire"), macintosh("macintosh"). Basically I want to pass arguments for a constructor of class T declared by list<T> when I'm creating a list. Sorry if I'm not explaining this right, feel free to edit my question if you have that ability.

Thanks

EDIT This question seems to be confusing and it's probably because I gave a bad example. I need to redesign my class. Following this example though what I wanted is a list that is all empire apples and each apple in that list has a designated type of empire, and a list that is all macintosh apples and each apple in that list has a designated type of macintosh.

So to clarify some or confuse some more here we go.

class apple
{
public:
    string variety_name;
    string description;
    apple::apple(string variety_name, string description)
        : variety_name(variety_name), description(description)
    {
    }
};
int _tmain(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[])
{
    // Vlad from Moscow's answer
    std::list<apple> empire(1, apple("empire", "picked yesterday")),
        macintosh(1, apple( "macintosh", "picked yesterday")); 

    // Vaughn Cato's answer
    empire.push_back(apple("empire", "picked today"));
    macintosh.push_back(apple("macintosh", "picked today"));

    for(list<apple>::iterator it=empire.begin(); it != empire.end(); ++it)
    {
        cout << it->variety_name << " " << it->description << endl;
    }

    for(list<apple>::iterator it=macintosh.begin(); it != macintosh.end(); ++it)
    {
        cout << it->variety_name << " " << it->description << endl;
    }

    return 0;
}

So as you can see it would be easier to store the variety once rather than each time; my class obviously needs a redesign but that doesn't make the answers any less valid. Everyone thanks for your help

share|improve this question
    
You need at least copy constructors, and (in C++11) move constructors too. –  Basile Starynkevitch Jan 12 at 20:49
    
std::list<apple> empire creates a list of apples called "empire". Did you intend for empire to be a list of apples or just a single apple? –  Vaughn Cato Jan 12 at 21:02
    
@Vaughn Empire to be a list of empire apples –  test Jan 12 at 21:10
1  
Info regarding the apple empire: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Empire_%28apple%29 –  Dieter Lücking Jan 12 at 21:13
1  
@test: From your example, it seems like you are wanting to associate the name with the list instead of with the individual apples in the list, even though the name is part of the apple, so I'm trying to understand your expectations. –  Vaughn Cato Jan 12 at 21:18

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

In C++11 you may use an initializer-list:

#include <list>
#include <string>

int main() {
    // C++11 initializer-list
    std::list<std::string> species = { "empire", "macintosh" };


    // Without C++11: You may initialize with an array:
    const char* species_array[] = { "empire", "macintosh" };
    std::list<std::string> species_list(
        species_array,
        species_array + sizeof(species_array)/sizeof(species_array[0]));
    return 0;
}

With apples it is:

int main() {
    // C++11 initializer-list
    std::list<apple> species = { apple("empire"), apple("macintosh") };


    // Without C++11: Initialize with an array:
    const apple species_arry[] = { apple("empire"), apple("macintosh") };
    std::list<apple> species_list(
        species_arry,
        species_arry + sizeof(species_arry)/sizeof(species_arry[0]));
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
I'm using Visual Studio 2010 and I was only able to use the Without C++11 method but it works. –  test Jan 12 at 21:48

Sure, you can use emplace(), emplace_front() and emplace_back() to construct object in-place with appropriate constructor:

std::list<apple> list;
list.emplace(list.end(), "one");
list.emplace_front("two");
list.emplace_back("three");
share|improve this answer

You can do

std::list<apple> a;
a.push_back(apple("delicious"));
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for showing the most common approach. –  StackedCrooked Jan 12 at 22:12

This

apple(string name);

is a so-called conversion constructor. It converts an object of type std::string to an object of type apple. It can be called implicitly by the compiler when it is awaiting an object of type aoole but gets an object of type std::string.

You could not do so if you would declare the constructor as explicit. For example

explicit apple(string name);

In this case your would need explicitly to specify the constructor. For example

std::list<apple> empire( 1, apple( "empire" ) ); 
share|improve this answer
    
I tried that but it doesn't work –  test Jan 12 at 21:10
    
@test It cannot work, there is no constructor in std::list<A> that takes just an A as param. –  Johan Jan 12 at 21:24
    
@test I am sorry but I do not know what code you compiled. At least your class definition contains an error. The constructor definition shall not have a qualified name. That is instead of testapple::apple(string name) : name(name) {} must be apple(string name) : name(name) {} though some constructors as MS VC++ allows to use qulified name. Also I have a typo. Add the secon argument 1. I uodated my post. –  Vlad from Moscow Jan 12 at 21:35
    
@Johan Thanks. it was a typo. At first I thought about push_back but forgot to change the code. –  Vlad from Moscow Jan 12 at 21:37
1  
Oh, now it is clear. It is a general constructor for most standard containers the first parameter of which specifies how many elements you are going to add to the container and the second parameter specifies an initial value which will be assigned to the elements. For example if you want to add in a list 10 integers that all have value 5 you could write std::list<int> l( 10, 5 ); –  Vlad from Moscow Jan 12 at 21:55

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