Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

In my understanding, two-dimensional list in Python is just a list of lists, so a two-dimensional list can be defined as follows:

a=[[0,0],[1,1]]

To get an element of this two-dimensional list, we have to write

a[0][1]

while the following form

a[0,1]

will cause an error. That is, indexes should be separated by [], instead of being putting together in one [] separated by comma.

However, in page 59 of the book "Python Essential Reference", Fourth Edition, David M. Beazley, I read:

enter image description here

In the image above, we can see that multidimensional list can be written in the form of, say, m[1:10, 3:20]. But how to define such a two-demensional list in Python so that we can get an element using m[1,2] form? Thanks.

share|improve this question
2  
a[0,1] is equivalent to a[(0, 1)], which calls a.__getitem__((0, 1)). a[0][1] first gets the first item in a (also with a.__getitem__), then gets that returned list's second item. You'd have to implement __getitem__ on your own class to handle these cases, which is why the document doesn't include builtin lists in its "multidimensional data structures". –  Blender Jan 13 at 6:18
    
@Blender So the slices shown in the book is for user-defined classes? –  aIKid Jan 13 at 6:20
    
@Blender I have the same question as aIKid –  user2384994 Jan 13 at 6:29
    
@user2384994: Builtin lists only support indices and "regular" slices, not tuples of slices. __getitem__ is just a regular method, so it's up to you to implement it. You could even do something like obj[{'foo': 12}]. –  Blender Jan 13 at 6:38
    
@Blender I see. Thank you for the mind-opening comment. Do you mind writing your comments as an answer so that I can tick it? –  user2384994 Jan 13 at 6:44

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

That is, indexes should be separated by [], instead of being putting together in one [] separated by comma.

a[0,1] is equivalent to a[(0, 1)], which calls a.__getitem__((0, 1)).

a[0][1] is equivalent to a.__getitem__(0).__getitem__(1). As you can see, the brackets are really just a nice way of calling __getitem__.

Python lists only support integers and slice objects as the arguments to __getitem__, so you can't write a[0, 1]. You can, however, write your own class and have __getitem__ do whatever you want:

>>> class Something(object):
...     def __getitem__(self, arg):
...         return arg
...     
>>> Something()[{1, 2, 3}, {4, 5, 6}, 'foo', ..., 12, 4:2]
    ({1, 2, 3}, {4, 5, 6}, 'foo', Ellipsis, 12, slice(4, 2, None))
share|improve this answer

Even though Python lists do not have more than one dimension the notation with two or more indices / slices is needed for arrays / matrices which come with numpy. Even though it (intentionally) doesn't belong to the core library it has become a de facto standard for n-dimensional arrays.

Here you can type

>>> import numpy as np
>>> ar = np.array([[1,2],[3,4]])
>>> ar[0,0]
1
>>> ar[:,0]
array([1, 3])

>>> random_array = np.random.random((100,100))
>>> random_array[50:60,30:35]
array([[ 0.8352567 ,  0.14901839,  0.2409099 ,  0.88278442,  0.84300552],
       [ 0.88403713,  0.54964811,  0.83500869,  0.88258427,  0.90273584],
       [ 0.00271817,  0.94116153,  0.6282039 ,  0.3243262 ,  0.71785796],
       [ 0.0661821 ,  0.99243509,  0.5888741 ,  0.04161134,  0.89517395],
       [ 0.87419943,  0.14761041,  0.06123542,  0.8139316 ,  0.66220133],
       [ 0.24710625,  0.02305463,  0.7301232 ,  0.11279152,  0.57674316],
       [ 0.9893136 ,  0.9711931 ,  0.12936097,  0.49021876,  0.24834283],
       [ 0.48277394,  0.76470469,  0.29348414,  0.43578663,  0.69670601],
       [ 0.43401812,  0.14714134,  0.52015761,  0.40088974,  0.25203087],
       [ 0.9431969 ,  0.04824567,  0.98400652,  0.1129802 ,  0.25518842]])

Custom classes seem to be a very special use case - numpy arrays are really used a lot, almost no scientific Python library does not use numpy.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you very much for the detailed answer. –  user2384994 Jan 13 at 7:19
1  
You're welcome. –  Thorsten Kranz Jan 13 at 7:21

A class like this handles it:

class List(list):
  def __getitem__(self, index):
    if type(index) is int:
      return super(List, self).__getitem__(index)
    l = self
    for i in index:
      if not isinstance(l, list)
        raise IndexError('Too many indexes: out of depth.')
      l = l[i]
    return l

You can use it like this:

>>> l = List([[1,2,3],[3,2,1]])
>>> print l[1,2]
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you very much for the sample codes of user-defined class that support l[1,2] form of indexing. –  user2384994 Jan 13 at 7:20

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.