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I got strange error message when tried to save first_name, last_name to Django's auth_user model.

Failed examples

user = User.object.create_user(username, email, password)
user.first_name = u'Rytis'
user.last_name = u'Slatkevičius'
user.save()
>>> Incorrect string value: '\xC4\x8Dius' for column 'last_name' at row 104

user.first_name = u'Валерий'
user.last_name = u'Богданов'
user.save()
>>> Incorrect string value: '\xD0\x92\xD0\xB0\xD0\xBB...' for column 'first_name' at row 104

user.first_name = u'Krzysztof'
user.last_name = u'Szukiełojć'
user.save()
>>> Incorrect string value: '\xC5\x82oj\xC4\x87' for column 'last_name' at row 104

Succeed examples

user.first_name = u'Marcin'
user.last_name = u'Król'
user.save()
>>> SUCCEED

MySQL settings

mysql> show variables like 'char%';
+--------------------------+----------------------------+
| Variable_name            | Value                      |
+--------------------------+----------------------------+
| character_set_client     | utf8                       | 
| character_set_connection | utf8                       | 
| character_set_database   | utf8                       | 
| character_set_filesystem | binary                     | 
| character_set_results    | utf8                       | 
| character_set_server     | utf8                       | 
| character_set_system     | utf8                       | 
| character_sets_dir       | /usr/share/mysql/charsets/ | 
+--------------------------+----------------------------+
8 rows in set (0.00 sec)

Table charset and collation

Table auth_user has utf-8 charset with utf8_general_ci collation.

Results of UPDATE command

It didn't raise any error when updating above values to auth_user table by using UPDATE command.

mysql> update auth_user set last_name='Slatkevičiusa' where id=1;
Query OK, 1 row affected, 1 warning (0.00 sec)
Rows matched: 1  Changed: 1  Warnings: 0

mysql> select last_name from auth_user where id=100;
+---------------+
| last_name     |
+---------------+
| Slatkevi?iusa | 
+---------------+
1 row in set (0.00 sec)

PostgreSQL

The failed values listed above can be updated into PostgreSQL table when I switched the database backend in Django. It's strange.

mysql> SHOW CHARACTER SET;
+----------+-----------------------------+---------------------+--------+
| Charset  | Description                 | Default collation   | Maxlen |
+----------+-----------------------------+---------------------+--------+
...
| utf8     | UTF-8 Unicode               | utf8_general_ci     |      3 | 
...

But from http://www.postgresql.org/docs/8.1/interactive/multibyte.html, I found the following:

Name Bytes/Char
UTF8 1-4

Is it means unicode char has maxlen of 4 bytes in PostgreSQL but 3 bytes in MySQL which caused above error?

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It's a MySQL problem, not Django: stackoverflow.com/questions/1168036/… –  Vanuan May 21 at 20:05
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7 Answers 7

I had the same problem and resolved it by changing the character set of the column. Even though your database has a default character set of utf-8 I think it's possible for database columns to have a different character set in MySQL. Here's the command I used:

ALTER TABLE database.table MODIFY COLUMN col VARCHAR(255)  CHARACTER SET utf8 COLLATE utf8_general_ci NOT NULL;
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5  
Ugh, I changed all the character sets on everything I could until I really re-read this answer: columns can have their own character sets, independent of the tables and the database. That's crazy and also was exactly my problem. –  markpasc Jul 18 '11 at 17:43
    
This worked for me as well, using mysql with the defaults, in a TextField model. –  madprops Sep 9 '11 at 23:24
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If you have this problem here's a python script to change all the columns of your mysql database automatically.

#! /usr/bin/env python
import MySQLdb

host = "localhost"
passwd = "passwd"
user = "youruser"
dbname = "yourdbname"

db = MySQLdb.connect(host=host, user=user, passwd=passwd, db=dbname)
cursor = db.cursor()

cursor.execute("ALTER DATABASE `%s` CHARACTER SET 'utf8' COLLATE 'utf8_unicode_ci'" % dbname)

sql = "SELECT DISTINCT(table_name) FROM information_schema.columns WHERE table_schema = '%s'" % dbname
cursor.execute(sql)

results = cursor.fetchall()
for row in results:
  sql = "ALTER TABLE `%s` convert to character set DEFAULT COLLATE DEFAULT" % (row[0])
  cursor.execute(sql)
db.close()
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2  
This solution solved all my issues with a django app which was storing file and directory paths. Toss in dbname as your django database and let it run. Worked like a charm! –  Chris Aug 5 '12 at 22:39
    
Way better than changing them all manually. Thanks! –  Xiong Chiamiov Nov 4 '12 at 19:18
1  
This code didn't work for me until I added db.commit() before db.close(). –  Mark Erdmann Feb 28 '13 at 22:29
1  
Does this solution avoid the issue discussed in @markpasc comment: '...4-byte UTF-8 characters such as emoji in MySQL 5.1's 3-byte utf8 character set' –  CatShoes Apr 24 '13 at 16:51
    
the solution help me when i was deleting a record trough django admin, i didn't had any problem when creating o editing...weird! I was even able to delete directly in the db –  Javier Vieira Oct 22 '13 at 23:50
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None of these answers solved the problem for me. The root cause being:

You cannot store 4-byte characters in MySQL with the utf-8 character set.

MySQL has a 3 byte limit on utf-8 characters (yes, it's wack, nicely summed up by a Django developer here)

To solve this you need to:

  1. Change your MySQL database, table and columns to use the utf8mb4 character set (only available from MySQL 5.5 onwards)
  2. Specify the charset in your Django settings file as below:

settings.py

DATABASES = {
    'default': {
        'ENGINE':'django.db.backends.mysql',
        ...
        'OPTIONS': {'charset': 'utf8mb4'},
    }
}

Note: When recreating your database you may run into the 'Specified key was too long' issue.

The most likely cause is a CharField which has a max_length of 255 and some kind of index on it (e.g. unique). Because utf8mb4 uses 33% more space than utf-8 you'll need to make these fields 33% smaller.

In this case, change the max_length from 255 to 191.

Alternatively you can edit your MySQL configuration to remove this restriction but not without some django hackery

UPDATE: I just ran into this issue again and ended up switching to PostgreSQL because I was unable to reduce my VARCHAR to 191 characters.

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this answer needs way, way, way more upvotes. Thanks! The real problem is your application may run fine for years until someone tries to enter a 4byte character. –  Michael Bylstra Apr 30 at 3:44
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You can change the collation of your text field to UTF8_general_ci and the problem will be solved.

Notice, this cannot be done in Django.

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up vote 3 down vote accepted

I just figured out one method to avoid above errors.

Save to database

user.first_name = u'Rytis'.encode('unicode_escape')
user.last_name = u'Slatkevičius'.encode('unicode_escape')
user.save()
>>> SUCCEED

print user.last_name
>>> Slatkevi\u010dius
print user.last_name.decode('unicode_escape')
>>> Slatkevičius

Is this the only method to save strings like that into a MySQL table and decode it before rendering to templates for display?

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8  
I'm having a similar problem, but I don't agree that this is a valid solution. When you .encode('unicode_escape') you're not actually storing unicode characters in the database. You're forcing all the clients to unencode before using them, which means it won't work properly with django.admin or all sorts of other things. –  muudscope Apr 26 '10 at 16:43
1  
While it seems distasteful to store escape codes instead of characters, this is probably one of the few ways to save 4-byte UTF-8 characters such as emoji in MySQL 5.1's 3-byte utf8 character set. –  markpasc Jun 27 '12 at 15:22
    
stackoverflow.com/a/11597447/364114 is a better solution. –  Chris Aug 5 '12 at 22:41
1  
There is an encoding called utf8mb4 that allows more than the Basic Multilingual Plane to be stored. I know, you'd think "UTF8" is all that's needed to store Unicode fully. Well, whaddaya know, it's not. See dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.5/en/charset-unicode-utf8mb4.html –  Mihai Danila Aug 21 '13 at 21:03
    
@jack you might want to consider changing the accepted answer to one which is more useful –  donturner Dec 3 '13 at 11:13
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You aren't trying to save unicode strings, you're trying to save bytestrings in the UTF-8 encoding. Make them actual unicode string literals:

user.last_name = u'Slatkevičius'

or (when you don't have string literals) decode them using the utf-8 encoding:

user.last_name = lastname.decode('utf-8')
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@Thomas, i tried exactly as what you said but it still raise same errors. –  jack Jan 21 '10 at 11:54
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If it's a new project, I'd just drop the database, and create a new one with a proper charset:

CREATE DATABASE <dbname> CHARACTER SET utf8;
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