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The title speaks for itself. I have a file containing a base64 encoded byte[] of variable width integer, min 8 bit, max 32bit

I have a large file (48MB) and I am trying to find the fastest way of grabbing integers from the stream.

This is the fastest code from a perf app:

static int[] Base64ToIntArray3(string base64, int size)
{
    List<int> res = new List<int>();
    byte[] buffer = new byte[4];

    using (var ms = new System.IO.MemoryStream(Convert.FromBase64String(base64)))
    {
        while(ms.Position < ms.Length)
        {
            ms.Read(buffer, 0, size);
            res.Add(BitConverter.ToInt32(buffer, 0));
        }
    }

    return res.ToArray();
}

I can't see a faster way of padding the bytes to 32bit. Any ideas, chaps and chapettes? Solutions should be in c#. I could fall down to C/++ if i must but i don't want to.

share|improve this question
    
@Ashigore The input is variable width but the output is an array of the largest width, for simplicity. A 24bit value (as is common in my domain) will be padded to 32bit. –  Gusdor Jan 13 '14 at 11:46

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

There is no reason to use a memory stream to move bytes from an array to another array, just read from the array directly. Also, the size of the array is known, so there is need to add the items to a list that is then converted to an array, you can use an array from the start:

static int[] Base64ToIntArray3(string base64, int size) {
  byte[] data = Convert.FromBase64String(base64);
  int cnt = data.Length / size;
  int[] res = new int[cnt];
  for (int i = 0; i < cnt; i++) {
    switch (size) {
      case 1: res[i] = data[i]; break;
      case 2: res[i] = BitConverter.ToInt16(data, i * 2); break;
      case 3: res[i] = data[i * 3] + data[i * 3 + 1] * 256 + data[i * 3 + 2] * 65536; break;
      case 4: res[i] = BitConverter.ToInt32(data, i * 4); break;
    }
  }
  return res;
}

Note: Untested code! You have to verify that it actually does what it is supposed to do, but at least it shows the principle.

share|improve this answer
    
Could you expand upon the 24bit option? I'm not grasping it sadly :( –  Gusdor Jan 13 '14 at 12:06
    
@Gusdor: It uses ToUInt16 to get the first two bytes, then shifts them left by multiplying (you could use << 8 instead) and puts another byte after them to form the 24-bit value. Another alternative would be to get the bytes separately: data[i*3] * 65536 + data[i*3+1] * 256 + data[i*3+2]. –  Guffa Jan 13 '14 at 13:32
    
Unfortunately this does not work on my system. I'm using win7 x64 so it is LSB. Shouldn't only the last byte be multiplied? –  Gusdor Jan 13 '14 at 13:37
    
@Gusdor: Right, my bad, the byte order is of course the other way around. I adjusted the code above. –  Guffa Jan 13 '14 at 14:53
    
Looks like a candidate for Duff's device. Fall-through requires extra goto case statements in C#, but the compiled code ought to be branch-free. –  Ben Voigt Jan 13 '14 at 16:34

This is probably how I would do it. Not using a stream should increase performance. This seems like the sort of thing that should be easy to do using Linq but I couldn't figure it out.

    static int[] Base64ToIntArray3(string base64, int size)
    {
        if (size < 1 || size > 4) throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException("size");

        byte[] data = Convert.FromBase64String(base64);
        List<int> res = new List<int>();

        byte[] buffer = new byte[4];

        for (int i = 0; i < data.Length; i += size )
        {
            Buffer.BlockCopy(data, i, buffer, 0, size);
            res.Add(BitConverter.ToInt32(buffer, 0));
        }

        return res.ToArray();
    }
share|improve this answer

Ok so I believe this is the Linq way to do this:

    static int[] Base64ToIntArray3(string base64, int size)
    {
        byte[] data = Convert.FromBase64String(base64);
        return data.Select((Value, Index) => new { Value, Index })
                   .GroupBy(p => p.Index / size)
                   .Select(g => BitConverter.ToInt32(g.Select(p => p.Value).Union(new byte[4 - size]).ToArray(), 0))
                   .ToArray();
    }
share|improve this answer
    
I'm not convinced that this is any faster than your first answer ;) –  Gusdor Jan 13 '14 at 13:41
    
Nor am I :) But Linq has a way of optimizing, try it, it may surprise you. –  Ashigore Jan 13 '14 at 13:48
    
It's probably faster than one expects, but as it creates a buttload of objects and arrays, it can't be very fast. –  Guffa Jan 13 '14 at 14:10

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