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How can I return a list of files that are named duplicates i.e. have same name but in different case that exist in the same directory?

I don't care about the contents of the files. I just need to know the location and name of any files that have a duplicate of the same name.

Example duplicates:

/www/images/taxi.jpg
/www/images/Taxi.jpg

Ideally I need to search all files recursively from a base directory. In above example it was /www/

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what if you have same name but all in lowercase and all in different folders? which one you gonna delete? –  ghostdog74 Jan 21 '10 at 12:29
1  
@ghost: but in different case that exist in the same folder. –  paxdiablo Jan 21 '10 at 12:30
    
As pointed out by @paxdiablo I only care about named duplicates that exist in same folder. –  Camsoft Jan 21 '10 at 12:41
    
but you said ideally you need to search recursively? or am i missing something? –  ghostdog74 Jan 21 '10 at 12:43
1  
@Camsoft, have a rethink about which answer you want as accepted. The answer by @Christoffer Hammarström is a lot more elegant than mine and does exactly the same thing. –  paxdiablo Jan 21 '10 at 23:37

9 Answers 9

up vote 26 down vote accepted

I'm sorry, i don't have enough reputation to leave a comment yet.

The other answer is great, but instead of the "rather monstrous" perl script i suggest

perl -pe 's!([^/]+)$!lc $1!e'

Which will lowercase just the filename part of the path.

Edit: In fact the entire problem can be solved with:

find . | perl -ne 's!([^/]+)$!lc $1!e; print if 1 == $seen{$_}++'

Edit again: And here is a longer script that will print out the names, it takes a list of paths on stdin, as given by find. Not so elegant, but still:

#!/usr/bin/perl -w

use strict;
use warnings;

my %dup_series_per_dir;
while (<>) {
    my ($dir, $file) = m!(.*/)?([^/]+?)$!;
    push @{$dup_series_per_dir{$dir||'./'}{lc $file}}, $file;
}

for my $dir (sort keys %dup_series_per_dir) {
    my @all_dup_series_in_dir = grep { @{$_} > 1 } values %{$dup_series_per_dir{$dir}};
    for my $one_dup_series (@all_dup_series_in_dir) {
        print "$dir\{" . join(',', sort @{$one_dup_series}) . "}\n";
    }
}
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3  
+1. I would strongly suggest accepting this one as the answer (instead of my currently accepted answer). It's far more elegant. My final version's a monstrosity since I came at it from a pipeline viewpoint and had to add perl to get around a problem with tr. This answer is proof positive that you can often get far better solutions by stepping back and starting again. –  paxdiablo Jan 21 '10 at 23:35
1  
And use "find -type f" if you want it restricted to regular files(no directories). –  paxdiablo Jan 22 '10 at 0:00
    
Would be useful if the script displayed both offending files. –  Soviut Jun 22 '11 at 18:36
    
If you have multiple sub-directories to look for files with same name: find . |xargs -n 1 basename| perl -ne 's!([^/]+)$!lc $1!e; print if 1 == $seen{$_}++' –  Peter Senna Aug 25 '13 at 11:23
1  
@PeterSenna: Or just find . | perl -ne 's!.*/([^/]+)!lc $1!se; print if 1 == $seen{$_}++' –  Christoffer Hammarström Aug 25 '13 at 23:52

Try:

ls -1 | tr '[A-Z]' '[a-z]' | sort | uniq -c | grep -v " 1 "

Simple, really :-) Aren't pipelines wonderful beasts?

The ls -1 gives you the files one per line, the tr '[A-Z]' '[a-z]' converts all uppercase to lowercase, the sort sorts them (surprisingly enough), uniq -c removes subsequent occurrences of duplicate lines whilst giving you a count as well and, finally, the grep -v " 1 " strips out those lines where the count was one.

When I run this in a directory with one "duplicate" (I copied qq to qQ), I get:

2 qq

For the "this directory and every subdirectory" version, just replace ls -1 with find . or find DIRNAME if you want a specific directory starting point (DIRNAME is the directory name you want to use).

This returns (for me):

2 ./.gconf/system/gstreamer/0.10/audio/profiles/mp3
2 ./.gconf/system/gstreamer/0.10/audio/profiles/mp3/%gconf.xml
2 ./.gnome2/accels/blackjack
2 ./qq

which are caused by:

pax> ls -1d .gnome2/accels/[bB]* .gconf/system/gstreamer/0.10/audio/profiles/[mM]* [qQ]?
.gconf/system/gstreamer/0.10/audio/profiles/mp3
.gconf/system/gstreamer/0.10/audio/profiles/MP3
.gnome2/accels/blackjack
.gnome2/accels/Blackjack
qq
qQ

Update:

Actually, on further reflection, the tr will lowercase all components of the path so that both of

/a/b/c
/a/B/c

will be considered duplicates even though they're in different directories.

If you only want duplicates within a single directory to show as a match, you can use the (rather monstrous):

perl -ne '
    chomp;
    @flds = split (/\//);
    $lstf = $f[-1];
    $lstf =~ tr/A-Z/a-z/;
    for ($i =0; $i ne $#flds; $i++) {
        print "$f[$i]/";
    };
    print "$x\n";'

in place of:

tr '[A-Z]' '[a-z]'

What it does is to only lowercase the final portion of the pathname rather than the whole thing. In addition, if you only want regular files (no directories, FIFOs and so forth), use find -type f to restrict what's returned.

share|improve this answer
    
Wow. That is one impressive command. Can't imagine ever being able to do that in Windows. I love *nix. Thank you so much. –  Camsoft Jan 21 '10 at 12:26
    
You can do that on Windows just fine. Get yourself a copy of Cygwin or MinGW and enjoy :-) –  paxdiablo Jan 21 '10 at 12:27
    
But you can't do it out of the box. –  Camsoft Jan 21 '10 at 12:30
    
+1 for a good breakdown. –  kjfletch Jan 21 '10 at 12:30
2  
great answer, but 1 tiny suggestion for optimization: I think you don't need "-1" on ls if you're redirecting into a pipe. –  Carl Smotricz Jan 21 '10 at 12:53

I believe

ls | sort -f | uniq -i -d

is simpler, faster, and will give the same result

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, for the current directory. But how about subdirectories? Note that you can only ignore case for the basename, not the entire path. –  Christoffer Hammarström Jan 21 '10 at 17:01
    
On Mac OSX if you have non-ASCII characters you may need to set the character encoding with export LC_ALL='C' –  Turadg Aug 6 '11 at 22:08
    
for subdirectories add the -R switch to ls –  k.honsali Jan 28 at 12:09

This is a nice little command line app called findsn you get if you compile fslint that the deb package does not include.

it will find any files with the same name, and its lightning fast and it can handle different case.

/findsn --help
find (files) with duplicate or conflicting names.
Usage: findsn [-A -c -C] [[-r] [-f] paths(s) ...]

If no arguments are supplied the $PATH is searched for any redundant or conflicting files.

-A  reports all aliases (soft and hard links) to files.
    If no path(s) specified then the $PATH is searched.

If only path(s) specified then they are checked for duplicate named files. You can qualify this with -C to ignore case in this search. Qualifying with -c is more restrictive as only files (or directories) in the same directory whose names differ only in case are reported. I.E. -c will flag files & directories that will conflict if transfered to a case insensitive file system. Note if -c or -C specified and no path(s) specified the current directory is assumed.

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Following up on the response of mpez0, to detect recursively just replace "ls" by "find .". The only problem I see with this is that if this is a directory that is duplicating, then you have 1 entry for each files in this directory. Some human brain is required to treat the output of this.

But anyway, you're not automatically deleting these files, are you?

find . | sort -f | uniq -i -d
share|improve this answer
    
This is possibly a comment more than an answer, seems to be asking clarifying questions. –  vgoff Nov 17 '12 at 3:32

Here is an example how to find all duplicate jar files:

find . -type f -printf "%f\n" -name "*.jar" | sort -f | uniq -i -d

Replace *.jar with whatever duplicate file type you are looking for.

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Here's a script that worked for me ( I am not the author). the original and discussion can be found here: http://www.daemonforums.org/showthread.php?t=4661

#! /bin/sh

# find duplicated files in directory tree
# comparing by file NAME, SIZE or MD5 checksum
# --------------------------------------------
# LICENSE(s): BSD / CDDL
# --------------------------------------------
# vermaden [AT] interia [DOT] pl
# http://strony.toya.net.pl/~vermaden/links.htm

__usage() {
  echo "usage: $( basename ${0} ) OPTION DIRECTORY"
  echo "  OPTIONS: -n   check by name (fast)"
  echo "           -s   check by size (medium)"
  echo "           -m   check by md5  (slow)"
  echo "           -N   same as '-n' but with delete instructions printed"
  echo "           -S   same as '-s' but with delete instructions printed"
  echo "           -M   same as '-m' but with delete instructions printed"
  echo "  EXAMPLE: $( basename ${0} ) -s /mnt"
  exit 1
  }

__prefix() {
  case $( id -u ) in
    (0) PREFIX="rm -rf" ;;
    (*) case $( uname ) in
          (SunOS) PREFIX="pfexec rm -rf" ;;
          (*)     PREFIX="sudo rm -rf"   ;;
        esac
        ;;
  esac
  }

__crossplatform() {
  case $( uname ) in
    (FreeBSD)
      MD5="md5 -r"
      STAT="stat -f %z"
      ;;
    (Linux)
      MD5="md5sum"
      STAT="stat -c %s"
      ;;
    (SunOS)
      echo "INFO: supported systems: FreeBSD Linux"
      echo
      echo "Porting to Solaris/OpenSolaris"
      echo "  -- provide values for MD5/STAT in '$( basename ${0} ):__crossplatform()'"
      echo "  -- use digest(1) instead for md5 sum calculation"
      echo "       $ digest -a md5 file"
      echo "  -- pfexec(1) is already used in '$( basename ${0} ):__prefix()'"
      echo
      exit 1
    (*)
      echo "INFO: supported systems: FreeBSD Linux"
      exit 1
      ;;
  esac
  }

__md5() {
  __crossplatform
  :> ${DUPLICATES_FILE}
  DATA=$( find "${1}" -type f -exec ${MD5} {} ';' | sort -n )
  echo "${DATA}" \
    | awk '{print $1}' \
    | uniq -c \
    | while read LINE
      do
        COUNT=$( echo ${LINE} | awk '{print $1}' )
        [ ${COUNT} -eq 1 ] && continue
        SUM=$( echo ${LINE} | awk '{print $2}' )
        echo "${DATA}" | grep ${SUM} >> ${DUPLICATES_FILE}
      done

  echo "${DATA}" \
    | awk '{print $1}' \
    | sort -n \
    | uniq -c \
    | while read LINE
      do
        COUNT=$( echo ${LINE} | awk '{print $1}' )
        [ ${COUNT} -eq 1 ] && continue
        SUM=$( echo ${LINE} | awk '{print $2}' )
        echo "count: ${COUNT} | md5: ${SUM}"
        grep ${SUM} ${DUPLICATES_FILE} \
          | cut -d ' ' -f 2-10000 2> /dev/null \
          | while read LINE
            do
              if [ -n "${PREFIX}" ]
              then
                echo "  ${PREFIX} \"${LINE}\""
              else
                echo "  ${LINE}"
              fi
            done
        echo
      done
  rm -rf ${DUPLICATES_FILE}
  }

__size() {
  __crossplatform
  find "${1}" -type f -exec ${STAT} {} ';' \
    | sort -n \
    | uniq -c \
    | while read LINE
      do
        COUNT=$( echo ${LINE} | awk '{print $1}' )
        [ ${COUNT} -eq 1 ] && continue
        SIZE=$( echo ${LINE} | awk '{print $2}' )
        SIZE_KB=$( echo ${SIZE} / 1024 | bc )
        echo "count: ${COUNT} | size: ${SIZE_KB}KB (${SIZE} bytes)"
        if [ -n "${PREFIX}" ]
        then
          find ${1} -type f -size ${SIZE}c -exec echo "  ${PREFIX} \"{}\"" ';'
        else
          # find ${1} -type f -size ${SIZE}c -exec echo "  {}  " ';'  -exec du -h "  {}" ';'
          find ${1} -type f -size ${SIZE}c -exec echo "  {}  " ';'
        fi
        echo
      done
  }

__file() {
  __crossplatform
  find "${1}" -type f \
    | xargs -n 1 basename 2> /dev/null \
    | tr '[A-Z]' '[a-z]' \
    | sort -n \
    | uniq -c \
    | sort -n -r \
    | while read LINE
      do
        COUNT=$( echo ${LINE} | awk '{print $1}' )
        [ ${COUNT} -eq 1 ] && break
        FILE=$( echo ${LINE} | cut -d ' ' -f 2-10000 2> /dev/null )
        echo "count: ${COUNT} | file: ${FILE}"
        FILE=$( echo ${FILE} | sed -e s/'\['/'\\\['/g -e s/'\]'/'\\\]'/g )
        if [ -n "${PREFIX}" ]
        then
          find ${1} -iname "${FILE}" -exec echo "  ${PREFIX} \"{}\"" ';'
        else
          find ${1} -iname "${FILE}" -exec echo "  {}" ';'
        fi
        echo
      done 
  }

# main()

[ ${#} -ne 2  ] && __usage
[ ! -d "${2}" ] && __usage

DUPLICATES_FILE="/tmp/$( basename ${0} )_DUPLICATES_FILE.tmp"

case ${1} in
  (-n)           __file "${2}" ;;
  (-m)           __md5  "${2}" ;;
  (-s)           __size "${2}" ;;
  (-N) __prefix; __file "${2}" ;;
  (-M) __prefix; __md5  "${2}" ;;
  (-S) __prefix; __size "${2}" ;;
  (*)  __usage ;;
esac

If the find command is not working for you, you may have to change it. For example

OLD :   find "${1}" -type f | xargs -n 1 basename 
NEW :   find "${1}" -type f -printf "%f\n"
share|improve this answer
find -type d -exec sh -c " ls {} | uniq -cid" \; 

last answer is wrong.

so i change to this :

find -type f  -exec readlink -m {} \; | gawk 'BEGIN{FS="/";OFS="/"}{$NF=tolower($NF);print}' | uniq -c

find -type f : recursion print all file's full path.

-exec readlink -m {} \; : get file's absolute path

gawk 'BEGIN{FS="/";OFS="/"}{$NF=tolower($NF);print}' : replace the all filename's to lower case

uniq -c : unique the path, -c output the count of duplicate.

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you should consider giving minimum explanation to your code –  web-tiki Dec 19 '13 at 12:29
    
Hello and welcome to SO! Please read the FAQ on how to provide a good answer. At least some explanation would be nice. –  wonko79 Dec 19 '13 at 12:30
1  
Please give explanation for your code –  karthik Dec 19 '13 at 12:40

I just used fdupes on CentOS to clean up a whole buncha duplicate files...

yum install fdupes

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