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Regarding C# naming for acronyms, if I was writing a library related to the Windows API is there any strong convention toward either WindowsApi or WindowsAPI or is it just personal preference?

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up vote 23 down vote accepted

There is a convention, and it specifies initial uppercase, the rest lowercase, for all acronyms that are more than 2 characters long. Hence HttpContext and ClientID.

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9  
Id - is preferable capitalization. "Two other terms that are in common usage are in a category by themselves, because they are common slang abbreviations. The two words "Ok" and "Id" (and they should be cased as shown) are the exceptions to the guideline that no abbreviations should be used in names". "Framework Design Guidelines" 2nd edition, p.44. – Sergey Teplyakov Jan 21 '10 at 13:31
12  
Someone noted that if ID stood for "Identifying Datum" (rather than "Identifier"), ID would be OK again. Sorry, Ok again. – peterchen Jan 21 '10 at 14:28
1  
@Sergey Teplyakov Microsoft guidelines says to use Pascal only for abbreviations more than 2 characters. In the case of ID and OK, all caps is okay, however HTML becomes Html. msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/141e06ef(v=VS.71).aspx – smdrager Mar 23 '11 at 18:52
1  
@smdrager: to be fair, this is only explicitly recommended for acronyms, not abbreviations. – David Hedlund Mar 23 '11 at 19:42
1  
@smdrager: FDG says that those two are exceptions for this rule. You could open this book on p.44 and take a look at those exceptions yourself:) – Sergey Teplyakov Mar 23 '11 at 19:43

"Framework Design Guidelines" 2nd edition by Krzysztof Cwalina and Brad Abrams pp.40-42

3.1.2 Capitalizing Acronyms

DO capitalize both characters on two-character acronyms, except the first word of a camel-cased identifier.

System.IO
public void StartIO(Stream ioStream)

DO capitalize only the first character of acronyms with three or more characters, except the first word of a camel-cased identifier.

System.Xml
public void ProcessHtmlTag(string htmlTag)

DO NOT capitalize any of the characters of any acronyms, whatever their length, at the beginning of a camel-cased identifier.

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Check microsoft official naming guidelines here Naming Guidelines

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1  
That document is for .NET 1.1. – Daniel A. White Jan 21 '10 at 12:43
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I don't see what difference that makes? It's not like they changed conventions between each version or anything. – Skurmedel Jan 21 '10 at 12:45
1  
There is a second edition of the design guidelines book. I haven't compared to determine that there are no changes at all in naming. – John Saunders Jan 21 '10 at 13:45
    
Fair enough :) but my point was that surely it can't have changed that much that the old naming conventions are completely deprecated. – Skurmedel Jan 21 '10 at 13:59
    
.NET 4.5 guidelines relating to capitalization: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms229043(v=vs.110).aspx – grahamesd yesterday

I've heard that you should avoid abbreviations, so it would become WindowsApplicationProgrammingInterface, then.

More seriously (folks seem to be mis-reading the above, despite the quote below), this page says:

Any acronyms of three or more letters should be Pascal case, not all caps.

Since API is considered a well-known acronym, the name WindowsApi is the one to pick if you want to follow the guidelines.

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2  
Abbreviations are ok if they are well-known within the domain. API is well-known within programming. – John Saunders Jan 21 '10 at 12:41
    
+1. The Framework Guidelines book recommends that you either avoid abbreviations or acronyms or use PascalCase. I would suggest WindowsApi. Example from the framework: Uri, UriBuilder HtmlDecode. – Skurmedel Jan 21 '10 at 12:42
1  
@John: Yeah, I was being a bit tongue-in-cheek on that one. :) – unwind Jan 21 '10 at 12:51
    
@unwind - does that mean we can use html instead of HyperTextMarkupLanguage? – Larry Watanabe Jan 21 '10 at 12:56
    
-1: from Framework Design Guidelines: "In general, it is important to avoid using acronyms in identifier names unless they are in common usage and are immediately understandable to anyone who might use the framework. For example, HTML, XML, and IO are all well understood, but less well-known acronyms should definitely be avoidable". API - is commonly used and immediately understandable acronym. – Sergey Teplyakov Jan 21 '10 at 13:21

Its personal preference. But .NET would use WindowsApi. It is akin to the naming of TcpClient.

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It's all just personal (or organizational) preference. As long as you're consistent, you'll be ok.

The .NET Framework itself would use WindowsApi.

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Take a look at FxCop too. It's a nice utility that will help with issues like this.

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Nothing better than the code snippet :)

According to the book [code complete 2nd version], I concluded this c# version naming conversion

namespace YourNameSpace.SubSpace
{
    //Class,Interface,Enum are in mixed with an initial upper letter
    enum EnumTypes
    {
        None = 0x0,
        Sunday = 0x1,
        Monday = 0x2,
        Tuesday = 0x4,
        Wednesday = 0x8,
        Thursday = 0x10,
        Friday = 0x20,
        Saturday = 0x40
    }

    public class SampleClassName
    {

        //If the variable is only access within a class is prefixed with an m_ .
        private string m_PrivateVariable = String.Empty;

        private EnumTypes m_LocaleEumTypes = EnumTypes.None;

        //Named constants are in ALL_CAPS
        public const int CONSTANT_VARIABLE = 5;

        //Properties
        public string Properties
        {
            get { return m_PrivateVariable; }
            set { m_PrivateVariable = value; }
        }

        //Constructor
        public SampleClassName()
        {
            ///to do
        }

        //Methods
        public void MethodA(String paramString)
        {
            //Local variables are with an initial lowercase letter.
            string localVariable = String.Empty;

            ///to do
        }
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Contains global variables for project.
    /// </summary>
    public static class GlobalVariable
    {
        static int m_GlobalValue;

        /// <summary>
        /// Global variables are prefixed with a g_
        /// </summary>
        public static int g_GlobalValue
        {
            get
            {
                return m_GlobalValue;
            }
            set
            {
                m_GlobalValue = value;
            }
        }

        public static bool g_GlobalBoolean;
    }
}
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why do you need "m_" in front of fields? – Aleksey Bykov Oct 27 '12 at 16:34
    
@bonomo you can use any prefix you want. Here I used "m_" as a prefix for member variables. – ValidfroM Oct 28 '12 at 16:03
    
well my point is there is no need in prefixes, is there? – Aleksey Bykov Oct 28 '12 at 17:03
    
@bonomo you are right,technically, there is no need in prefixes at all. To me ,with prefixes, it can help me to quickly indentify which variable is local ,global or a member variable. – ValidfroM Oct 28 '12 at 19:56
3  
I think the best way for identifying a field from a local variable/argument is to use "this" keyword: for example: private String value; public String Value { get { return this.value; } set { this.value = value; }} – Aleksey Bykov Oct 28 '12 at 20:26

Old question, new answer.

According to the "Capitalization Rules for Acronyms" section of the MSDN Capitalization Conventions article:

Do capitalize both characters of two-character acronyms, except the first word of a camel-cased identifier.

A property named DBRate is an example of a short acronym (DB) used as the first word of a Pascal-cased identifier. A parameter named ioChannel is an example of a short acronym (IO) used as the first word of a camel-cased identifier.

Do capitalize only the first character of acronyms with three or more characters, except the first word of a camel-cased identifier.

A class named XmlWriter is an example of a long acronym used as the first word of a Pascal-cased identifier. A parameter named htmlReader is an example of a long acronym used as the first word of a camel-cased identifier.

Do not capitalize any of the characters of any acronyms, whatever their length, at the beginning of a camel-cased identifier.

A parameter named xmlStream is an example of a long acronym (xml) used as the first word of a camel-cased identifier. A parameter named dbServerName is an example of a short acronym (db) used as the first word of a camel-cased identifier.

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