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I have a function that allows me to set some void *user_data which I am using to store a pointer to a struct job_data defined as:

struct job_data {
  int *i
  struct *j;
}

It does this by allowing me to pass my pointer to the user_data setting function through the call, so if I've got struct job_data job_info, I would set it via set_user_data(&job_info) where *set_user_data* receives a void * as a parameter.

However, when I get my pointer back later and cast it via struct job_data *job=user_data, the pointers inside (job.i and job.j) are set to different pointers than in the original job_data structure that I had cast to void *. Why is that? What should I do differently to recapture my original i and j pointers?

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Please post a simplified version of your function, as well as how you call it. –  zmbq Jan 13 '14 at 13:17
    
and also specify how and where is original job_info declared, –  Jack Jan 13 '14 at 13:17
2  
Most likely: The scope that allocated struct job_data job_info on the stack no longer exists when you retrieve your pointer. –  Sergey L. Jan 13 '14 at 13:19
    
@SergeyL.: I though about it but that wouldn't change the pointer, this would just invalidate dereference of fields. –  Jack Jan 13 '14 at 13:24
    
@Jack Exactly! The contents of the struct will have been overwritten by then. That is why he is observing different values for i and j then were intended. –  Sergey L. Jan 13 '14 at 13:28

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Most likely the scope that allocated struct job_data job_info on the stack no longer exists when you retrieve your pointer.

If the scope has ended by the time you retrieve your pointer then the contents will most likely have been overwritten by then.

You can fix this by either making sure the scope is valid as long as the pointer has to be accessed or to allocate the struct on the heap (malloc and family).

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