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I have created a different init method and would like that to be the designated initializer instead of the standard -init. How can I prevent client code from instantiating the class using -init?

e.g.

/* everyone must call this */
- (id)initWithInfo:(NSDictionary *)info {
  self = [super init];
  if (self) {
      _info = info;
  }

  return self;
}

/* Don't want anyone to be able to create this using init */
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marked as duplicate by Matthias Bauch, ipmcc, trojanfoe, Martin R, Josh Caswell Jan 13 '14 at 19:39

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

2  
sidenote: your method is missing return self; – Guillaume Algis Jan 13 '14 at 13:30
    
and it's "designated initializer", not "default initializer". – trojanfoe Jan 13 '14 at 13:33
1  
Either map init to another init... or make it throw an error. There's no way to "hide" it. – Hot Licks Jan 13 '14 at 13:33
    
How about leave the init alone and mention in your documentation how the object should be initialized? – Desdenova Jan 13 '14 at 13:38
1  

init comes from the hierarchy of NSObject. Every class will have init.

Hence you can't remove the method of super-class.

Also user / developer can use any other way to create a new object like new, initWith....

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While you can't remove superclass initializers, you can "block" them by overriding them like this:

- (id)init
{
    NSAssert(NO, @"Use the designated initializer: -initWithInfo:");
    [self doesNotRecognizeSelector: _cmd];
    if (self = [super init])
    {
        self = nil;
    }
    return self;
}

This will at least "fail fast" (at runtime.) It'd be nice if this could be made to fail at compile time, but I don't believe there's any way to achieve that at this point.

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1  
Why call [super init] at all? – trojanfoe Jan 13 '14 at 13:34
    
I guess you probably don't need to. – ipmcc Jan 13 '14 at 13:36
    
And if it fails, the assert won't fire. It makes no sense. It's "fail fairly fast". – trojanfoe Jan 13 '14 at 13:37
    
Just for you, I'll move the assert outside the conditional. The important part of the sauce here is -doesNotRecognizeSelector: – ipmcc Jan 13 '14 at 13:38
    
Do it for all of mankind, or even just yourself. Don't worry about me as I won't use the code. – trojanfoe Jan 13 '14 at 13:38

You could try this:

- (id)init 
{
  return [self initWithInfo:@{}];
}

- (id)initWithInfo:(NSDictionary *)info 
{
  self = [super init];
  if (self) 
  {
      _info = [NSDictionary dictionaryWithDictionary:info];
  }
  return self;
}
share|improve this answer
3  
How you pass data to someDictionary??? Before allocation of class? – Tirth Jan 13 '14 at 13:33
    
All the idea of the question is initializing the object with a custom dictionary and you are setting it to nil. – Desdenova Jan 13 '14 at 13:41
    
This approach is good when you have to do some custom initializations, but in order to initialize info dictionary, must be called initWithInfo method. There is nothing to be sent by calling init method. – Radu Matei Jan 13 '14 at 13:51

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