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This question already has an answer here:

I'm trying loop through a dict which has an unknown number of nested layers.

I want to write a function which loops through each layer until the very end.

I believe a recursive function is required here but I would like some advice on how to do it.

here's the code logic:

for levelone in file:
    for leveltwo in levelone:
        for levelthree in leveltwo:
            for levelfour in levelthree:
                ....

What do you guys think?

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marked as duplicate by jonrsharpe, livibetter, albertedevigo, codeling, jww Jan 14 '14 at 11:39

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

1  
Could you be more specific what you mean? Do you want to continue levelthree? How do you know how many loops are available? – kojiro Jan 13 '14 at 15:02
    
seems you are asking for breaking out – zhangxaochen Jan 13 '14 at 15:03
1  
Are you asking how you can process an unspecified number of nested lists/iterables? – Hannes Ovrén Jan 13 '14 at 15:05
    
Yes exactly, I would like to know how many more nested loops are available. – Boosted_d16 Jan 13 '14 at 15:10
1  
You need to be clearer; do you have a sequence of iterables and you want to produce their product? – Martijn Pieters Jan 13 '14 at 15:20
up vote 1 down vote accepted

To do this recursively you need to test each value to see if it's also a dict, which is a bit ugly in python and probably not very efficient. If it is, you call the function again on it and combine that return with what we have so far. If it's not a dict, you're at the bottom layer and can do whatever you'd like with the value.

def recurseDict(nested_dict):
    output = []

    for key, value in nested_dict.iteritems():
        if isinstance(value,dict):
            output = output + recurseDict(value)
        else:
            # Do whatever you want here, I'll just add the values to a list
            output.append(nested_dict[key])
    return output

Sample input and output:

In [28]: a = {'blue': 4, 'green': {'yellow': {'black': 16}}, 'red': 3}

In [29]: recurseDict(a)
Out[29]: [4, 16, 3]
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I think what you want to do is this:

def loop_through(iterable):
    try:
        for item in iterable:
            # do your thing
            loop_through(item)
    except TypeError:
        # not iterable, reached the bottom

Once you've put the appropriate functionality in, you can loop_through(file). Depending on what you want to do, you might need to return something from the recursive calls and deal with it, or create a container to put the results in:

def loop_through(iterable, container=None):
    if container is None:
        container = []
    try:
        for item in iterable:
            # do your thing
            loop_through(item, container)
    except TypeError:
        # not iterable, reached the bottom
share|improve this answer
    
Your solution is more modular than mine with the container. Would the try/except here be considered more pythonic, do you think? – Chris Arena Jan 13 '14 at 15:45
    
I would generally prefer try: except: in these cases; it allows you to work with any iterable (list, dict, tuple, set, ...) or object that supports the appropriate behaviour (without necessarily being a dict subclass) rather than explicitly checking for one of them. – jonrsharpe Jan 13 '14 at 15:47
    
True, but if you have to be doing manipulation of values in a dict you have to do more than just iterate through them eventually. – Chris Arena Jan 13 '14 at 15:51
    
@Decency, you were given a good skeleton; you may expand it from here – volcano Jan 13 '14 at 15:53
1  
In this specific case I would still rather use try: item[key], because then any object that implements __getitem__ will work correctly. – jonrsharpe Jan 13 '14 at 15:55

Use break.

for levelone in file:
    for leveltwo in levelone:
        for levelthree in leveltwo:
            for levelfour in levelthree:
                break # Continue levelthree iterations.
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