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The following loop is not good practice. Is it due to a String being the main condition of the for loop rather than an int variable, meaning the for loop is infinite? Also, is it due to there being no instance to enter 'end' to stop the loop?

Scanner in = new Scanner(System.in);
int i = 0;
for (String s = in.next(); !s.equals("end"); i++) 
{
    System.out.println("The value of i is: " + i + " and you entered " + s);
}

How can I rewrite it, so that it conforms to accepted style?

(This is a question in a past exam paper.)

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closed as primarily opinion-based by bmargulies, Kevin Panko, Code Maverick, Jon B, Blazemonger Jan 13 at 20:23

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

29  
it's not as much a bad practice as an infinite loop ... –  njzk2 Jan 13 at 16:30
    
"accepted style" is refering to any specific set of standards? –  ericbn Jan 13 at 16:34
    
5  
I would say the question as stated does not have an answer because the code in the given state can't be analyzed as a solution. It isn't correct code. Whether the solution is "good practice" or not depends on how it looks by the time you actually have a working solution. –  nmclean Jan 13 at 17:53
2  
I feel sorry for students that have to deal with such poorly designed questions and assignments. –  dansalmo Jan 13 at 21:17

17 Answers 17

Well your string s is never changing, which can lead to an infinite loop. You probably wanted:

for (String s = in.next(); !s.equals("end"); s = in.next(), i++) {
    ...
}

Some (me included) might say that i++ shouldn't be in the increment section of this loop, since it's not directly relevant to the condition:

for (String s = in.next(); !s.equals("end"); s = in.next()) {
    ...
    i++;
}

Is it due to a string being the main condition of the for loop rather than an int variable, meaning the for loop is infinite?

The original loop was indeed infinite (at least, after an initial input is entered and assuming "end" wasn't the first input). However, it's not for the reason you state. For-loops are most commonly written using integral loop control variables, but it's not always the case. For example, a common idiom for iterating through a linked list is:

for (Node node = list.head; node != null; node = node.next) {
    ...
}

The problem with your loop is that the string s is never changed, so it will never equal "end" unless that's the first input.

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and even then, you'll need to be sure that whatever it's looping against will always at some point have "end" as a value, otherwise it will infinite loop. –  user2366842 Jan 13 at 16:31
2  
for (String s; !(s = in.next()).equals("end");) does away with the duplication. –  Marko Topolnik Jan 13 at 16:56
7  
Marko: and also does away with readabilty… –  Petter Jan 13 at 20:36

I would suggest separating the looping condition and the call to Scannner.next():

while (in.hasNext()) {
    String s = in.next();
    if (s.equals("end")) {
      break;
    }
    System.out.println("The value of i is: " + i + " and you entered " + s);
    i++;
}

I think this is much easier to understand than trying to squeeze everything into a for expression.

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6  
I'm going to side with this one. a while loop is better practice for a loop with an unknown iteration length. –  peeskillet Jan 13 at 16:38
    
Yes, this is much clearer than the solutions trying to cram all logic into one boolean expression. –  Petter Jan 13 at 20:39
    
@peeskillet I can't say I agree with that. Yes, for-loops generally do have a known iteration length, but using one that does not isn't necessarily bad practice if it is used correctly. Indeed, what the OP has here is a valid use case for a for-loop: a clear initialization, a related condition and a related increment step. Indeed, there are other common cases where for-loops don't have a known iteration length; I touch upon this briefly in my answer. –  arshajii Jan 14 at 14:39

There are multiple problems with this code:

  1. s never changes after the initial assignment, so it's an infinite loop.
  2. Calling .next() could throw NoSuchElementException or IllegalStateException. Rather than catching these exceptions, I consider it more polite to check .hasNext() beforehand, since running out of input is a foreseeable rather than an exceptional situation. However, the alternative ask-for-forgiveness style could also be acceptable.
  3. The for-loop header does not form a coherent story — it initializes s and tests s, but updates i.
  4. In my opinion, System.out.format() would be slightly more preferable to System.out.println() with concatenation.

I would write it as:

Scanner in = new Scanner(System.in);
int i = 0;
String s;
while (in.hasNext() && !"end".equals(s = in.next())) {
    System.out.format("The value of i is: %d and you entered %s\n", i++, s);
}

It might also be a nice user interface touch to tell the user that end is a magic word to terminate the loop (assuming it were modified to work as probably intended).

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That while-condition is not very readable. It’s better to keep it as while(in.hasNext()) and keep the rest of the logic in the loop body. –  Petter Jan 13 at 20:38
    
@Petter I find it readable enough. I prefer it to @andersschuller's solution, where while (in.hasNext()) only tells part of the story. Here, the condition accurately describes how the loop should terminate. –  200_success Jan 13 at 20:55

The common practice with for loops is that the counter variable is repeated in each term:

for(int i=...; i<... ; i++)

In the example above, the code mixes variables. Which is confusing to the reader and probably lead to the bug that the loop only terminates if you input end as the first value.

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This loop is a bad idea, because you're taking setting s once from the user input and not in every iteration. Thus, it will cause you to run infinite time in case s was filled with value different from "end".

You probably wanted something more like this:

for (String s; (s = in.nextLine()).equals("end"); i++) 
{
    System.out.println("The value of i is: " + i + " and you entered " + s);
}
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This isn't a good idea because the string s may never equal "end". You'll probably want to check if the scanner has another string. Also, you only initialize the string to in.next() but you need to set s to the next string after each iteration of the loop.

while(in.hasNext()) {
  String s = in.next();
  if (s.equals("end")) {
    break;
  }
  // ..
}
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This approach is too bad.

The Given Code :-

Scanner in = new Scanner(System.in);
int i = 0;
for (String s = in.next(); !s.equals("end"); i++) 
{
    System.out.println("The value of i is: " + i + " and you entered " + s);
}

The 1st part of for loop only execute once in life.

String s = in.next() //Execute only once in life

The 2nd part of this for loop never be true , because the input console will never allow to enter the 2nd input.

!s.equals("end")//2nd part

This program will never allow to enter 2nd input from console, because the in.next() will execute only once.And the exit token for this loop is "end" which is not possible to enter after first input.

This type of loops should be implemented by while loop .

Scanner in = new Scanner(System.in);
while(in.hasNext()){
String yourdata=in.next();
if(yourdata.equals("end")){
//Stop the loop 
}
//Do you code here
}
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It bad practice because it's terminated only if next obtained token is "end". It does'n not consider situation like. e.g. end of input stream.

So when then stream ends and nowhere along "end" appeared you'l get s=null and NullPointerException at s.equals("end").

You can correct it e.g. by changing condition to in.hasNext() && !"end".equals(s).

Also s is never changing after it was initialized.

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If the question is "why rewrite it" the answer is basically as others have pointed out, that it's currently an infinite loop, and also that it's not very readable as it stands. Personally I'd rewrite it as a while loop, which several others have already pointed out how to do, as it makes your intentions a little more clear than a for loop with a counter that's counting up to infinity. Someone unfamiliar with how the code is supposed to work could easily confuse an infinite increment to be an oversight by the programmer who wrote it.

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The string s is never modified. The loop never ends. What about this :

    Scanner in = new Scanner(System.in);
    String s = "";
    for (int i = 0 ; !s.equals("end"); i++) {
        s = in.next();
        System.out.println("The value of i is: " + i + " and you entered "
                + s);
    }
share|improve this answer

Others have mentioned that the loop does not end because you are not changing the value of s, so the loop never ends. This may be what your professor intended, and it may not be. Bad code is bad practice, as a rule, but there are other reasons why this is bad practice.

What jumped out to me as being bad practice here, and what the professor could have intended, is the use of a for loop here. As my professor told me, "For loops are for when you know when you want the code to end, while loops are for when you don't know when you want the code to end." So if you have an iterable i such as this code:

for(i = 0; i<100; i++)
{
    ...
}

In this code, you know that you want to iterate i from 0 to 100. A while loop is what you would want to use in the situation your professor is discussing.

int counter;
while(*(str+counter))
    counter++;

You have no idea when the loop is going to end, because you don't know how long the str is, but you know that sometime it will get to the null pointer, and the loop will terminate. This generally what is best practice.

So for the code your professor posted, you may want it to look like this:

Scanner in = new Scanner(System.in);
int i = 0;
while(!s.equals("end"))
{
    i++;
    String s = in.next();
    System.out.println("The value of i is: " + i + " and you entered " + s);
}
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“As my professor told me” – In languages like Java, your professor is pretty objectively wrong. –  Konrad Rudolph Jan 13 at 18:36
1  
@KonradRudolph Is there an explanation that goes with that or what? –  JFA Jan 13 at 18:37
1  
I thought it was obvious from context: it contradicts established best practices. Using for loops in certain situations where you can’t prove the bound statically is an established idiom in Java. And since the only argument against doing so would be convention, this argument doesn’t hold. –  Konrad Rudolph Jan 13 at 18:39
    
@KonradRudolph I guess they told me that for C, and it was mirrored in my python book as well. Having taken Java before C or python, it made sense to me that the logic would hold true for Java as well. Many others in this thread are saying much the same thing, that a while loop would be better suited to this. What situations are you talking about where you can't prove the bound statically? –  JFA Jan 13 at 20:05
    
But the same is absolutely true for C – in fact, that’s where Java got the habit from. And a while loop might be better suited in this particular situation. That’s different from what you’re saying (and consequently I don’t see anybody else agreeing with you). for (Iterator i = something.iterator(); i.hasNext();) is such an idiomatic use, as is for (Scanner in = new Scanner(System.in); in.hasNext();). Python is a completely different case because Python’s for loops function differently. –  Konrad Rudolph Jan 14 at 9:06

It is not in good practice because of two things:

  1. for loops are meant to iterate over a collection of data
  2. a for loop consists of iterator initial state, loop condition and an iterating function that are related

The for statement just intermixes two different information (the stream and the counter). Even if it does work, it isn't good practice to do it.

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I think this is bad practice, because there isn't any need for a for loop. In this case, I believe it's useless. It could be just this:

Scanner in = new Scanner(System.in);
String s = in.next();
if (!s.equals("end"))
{
    System.out.println("You have enetered" + s);
}

See, there isn't any need for a loop. The loop you had was making things more complicated than they had to be. I was always think that things should be kept as simple as they can be unless they require complexity. For loops are only to be used when you have more than one action that you want the code to do. In the case above, only one thing is happening: the println statement, so there's no need for a loop. It's unnecesary...

Also, the loop never ends. So there's that too, but that's just faulty code. That's not why it's bad practice. It's bad practice because of the unnecesary use of a for loop. It's also faulty, because the code is wrong. So there are two different things going on with this code.

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Yes there is need for a loop. It is supposed to repeatedly accept input and print it until the input is "end". –  nmclean Jan 15 at 19:15

I would have just left a comment, but I don't have the rep yet. What I haven't seen explained is WHY your s value is not changing.

In a typical for loop:

for(a=1; a<=10; a+=1) {body}

the initial phrase, 'a=1', is ONLY performed once as an initialization.

the third phrase, 'a+=1', is performed once at the end of every cycle, until…

the second phrase, 'a>=10', evaluates false.

so a for loop would be represented in 'psuedo-code' something like this:

    a=1         // first phrase
:LoopLabel
    {body}
    a+=1        // third phrase
    if (a<=10)  // second phrase (boolean evaluation)
        then goto LoopLabel

Likewise, your example, in similar pseudo-code might look like this:

    Scanner in = new Scanner(System.in);
    int i = 0;
    String s = in.next()
:LoopLabel
    {
        System.out.println("The value of i is: " + i + " and you entered " + s);
    }
    ++i
    if (!s.equals("end"))
        goto LoopLabel

So the reason your program was an infinite loop was the value of 's' was only set on entry to your loop and never changed during each loop execution, as most likely desired.

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for (int i = 0; in.hasNext(); i++) {
    String s = in.next();
    if (s.equals("end")) {
        break;
    }
    ...

Endless loop, or no loop (when s is initially "end").

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2  
This would look much cleaner in a while loop –  peeskillet Jan 13 at 16:41
    
I still see no reason using a for loop rather a while loop. Do you agree and have just rewritten the for loop to work? –  Stefan Jan 13 at 20:43
    
I did that (without much conviction) to limit the scope of i. A while seems indeed more regular, as the for-parts are not entirely coherent. –  Joop Eggen Jan 13 at 23:08

A number of responses above are correct to say that what you've written is an infinite loop. But I wanted to clarify why this is an infinite loop. The for loop you're using differs from the other form you may be thinking of:

String[] stringArray = { "1", "2", "3" };
for (String s : stringArray) {
   System.out.println(s);
}

In that case, the variable s is initialized with the next value from your collection or array on each iteration. But that form of for loop works with collections and arrays and can't be used with iterators like the Scanner class.

The form of for loop you're using differs in that the initialization clause (where you have String s = in.next()) is called ONLY the first time through the loop. s is set that first time, then never changed.

You could re-write like this:

int i = 0;
for (String s = in.next(); !s.equals("end"); s = in.next()) {
    System.out.println("The value of i is: " + i++ + " and you entered " + s);
}

But another bad thing in here is that there's no null or end check. It's conceivable if not likely that you would run out of strings before you found one that equaled "end". If that happened, then the for test clause (the middle one) would give you a NullPointerException when it tried to the call to the equals() method. THAT is definitely bad practice. I would probably re-write this like this:

int i = 0;
while (in.hasNext()) {
    String s = in.next();
    if (s.equals("end")) {
        break;
    }
    System.out.println("The value of i is: " + i++ + " and you entered " + s);
}

If you really want a for loop instead of a while, it would be better to do this:

int i = 0;
for (Scanner in = new Scanner(System.in); in.hasNext();) {
    String s = in.next();
    if (s.equals("end")) {
        break;
    }
    System.out.println("The value of i is: " + i++ + " and you entered " + s);
}

One last variation that preserves the test against the string in the test clause would look like this:

int i = 0;
String s = "";
for (Scanner in = new Scanner(System.in);
     in.hasNext() && !s.equals("end"); 
     s = in.next()) {
    System.out.println("The value of i is: " + i++ + " and you entered " + s);
}

You could also add a null check in there before the s.equals("end") for total safety.

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It is not a good practice maybe because you are comparing the String s with a String but you are not comparing the value, you are comparing the memory position of the s value.

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There is no memory position comparison, it is a normal "equals" comparison, which will compare the content for strings. –  Paŭlo Ebermann Jan 13 at 20:52

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