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Whats the difference between

predict(rf, newdata=testSet)

and

predict(rf$finalModel, newdata=testSet) 

i train the model with preProcess=c("center", "scale")

tc <- trainControl("repeatedcv", number=10, repeats=10, classProbs=TRUE, savePred=T)
rf <- train(y~., data=trainingSet, method="rf", trControl=tc, preProc=c("center", "scale"))

and i receive 0 true positives when i run it on a centered and scaled testSet

testSetCS <- testSet
xTrans <- preProcess(testSetCS)
testSetCS<- predict(xTrans, testSet)
testSet$Prediction <- predict(rf, newdata=testSet)
testSetCS$Prediction <- predict(rf, newdata=testSetCS)

but receive some true positives when i run it on an unscaled testSet. I have to use the rf$finalModel to receive some true postives on the centered and scaled testSet and the rf object on the unscaled...what am i missing?


edit

tests:

tc <- trainControl("repeatedcv", number=10, repeats=10, classProbs=TRUE, savePred=T)
RF <-  train(Y~., data= trainingSet, method="rf", trControl=tc) #normal trainingData
RF.CS <- train(Y~., data= trainingSet, method="rf", trControl=tc, preProc=c("center", "scale")) #scaled and centered trainingData

on normal testSet:

RF predicts reasonable              (Sensitivity= 0.33, Specificity=0.97)
RF$finalModel predicts bad       (Sensitivity= 0.74, Specificity=0.36)
RF.CS predicts reasonable           (Sensitivity= 0.31, Specificity=0.97)
RF.CS$finalModel same results like RF.CS    (Sensitivity= 0.31, Specificity=0.97)

on centered and scaled testSetCS:

RF predicts very bad                (Sensitivity= 0.00, Specificity=1.00)
RF$finalModel predicts reasonable       (Sensitivity= 0.33, Specificity=0.98)
RF.CS predicts like RF              (Sensitivity= 0.00, Specificity=1.00)
RF.CS$finalModel predicts like RF       (Sensitivity= 0.00, Specificity=1.00)

so it seems as if the $finalModel needs the same format of trainingSet and testSet whereas the trained object accepts only uncentered and unscaled data, regardless of the selected preProcess parameter?

prediction code (where testSet is normal data and testSetCS is centered and scaled ):

testSet$Prediction <- predict(RF, newdata=testSet)
testSet$PredictionFM <- predict(RF$finalModel, newdata=testSet)
testSet$PredictionCS <- predict(RF.CS, newdata=testSet)
testSet$PredictionCSFM <- predict(RF.CS$finalModel, newdata=testSet)

testSetCS$Prediction <- predict(RF, newdata=testSetCS)
testSetCS$PredictionFM <- predict(RF$finalModel, newdata=testSetCS)
testSetCS$PredictionCS <- predict(RF.CS, newdata=testSetCS)
testSetCS$PredictionCSFM <- predict(RF.CS$finalModel, newdata=testSetCS)
share|improve this question
    
can you please post the prediction code for your last train objects, i.e., RF, RF.CS? –  doctorate Jan 14 at 19:07

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Frank,

This is really similar to your other question on Cross Validated.

You really need to

1) show your exact prediction code for each result

2) give us a reproducible example.

With the normal testSet, RF.CS and RF.CS$finalModel should not be giving you the same results and we should be able to reproduce that. Plus, there are syntax errors in your code so it can't be exactly what you executed.

Finally, I'm not really sure why you would use the finalModel object at all. The point of train is to handle the details and doing things this way (which is your option) circumvents the complete set of code that would normally be applied.

Here is a reproducible example:

 library(mlbench)
 data(Sonar)

 set.seed(1)
 inTrain <- createDataPartition(Sonar$Class)
 training <- Sonar[inTrain[[1]], ]
 testing <- Sonar[-inTrain[[1]], ]

 pp <- preProcess(training[,-ncol(Sonar)])
 training2 <- predict(pp, training[,-ncol(Sonar)])
 training2$Class <- training$Class
 testing2 <- predict(pp, testing[,-ncol(Sonar)])
 testing2$Class <- testing2$Class

 tc <- trainControl("repeatedcv", 
                    number=10, 
                    repeats=10, 
                    classProbs=TRUE, 
                    savePred=T)
 set.seed(2)
 RF <-  train(Class~., data= training, 
              method="rf", 
              trControl=tc)
 #normal trainingData
 set.seed(2)
 RF.CS <- train(Class~., data= training, 
                method="rf", 
                trControl=tc, 
                preProc=c("center", "scale")) 
 #scaled and centered trainingData

Here are some results:

 > ## These should not be the same
 > all.equal(predict(RF, testing,  type = "prob")[,1],
 +           predict(RF, testing2, type = "prob")[,1])
 [1] "Mean relative difference: 0.4067554"
 > 
 > ## Nor should these
 > all.equal(predict(RF.CS, testing,  type = "prob")[,1],
 +           predict(RF.CS, testing2, type = "prob")[,1])
 [1] "Mean relative difference: 0.3924037"
 > 
 > all.equal(predict(RF.CS,            testing, type = "prob")[,1],
 +           predict(RF.CS$finalModel, testing, type = "prob")[,1])
 [1] "names for current but not for target"
 [2] "Mean relative difference: 0.7452435" 
 >
 > ## These should be and are close (just based on the 
 > ## random sampling used in the final RF fits)
 > all.equal(predict(RF,    testing, type = "prob")[,1],
 +           predict(RF.CS, testing, type = "prob")[,1])
 [1] "Mean relative difference: 0.04198887"

Max

share|improve this answer
    
i used the $finalModel object because i thought that it contains the final (best) tree and therefore could calculate predictions and probabilities for new datasets. –  Frank Jan 15 at 7:12
    
It does and that is what predict.train uses. However, it might do some things to the data in-between that matter. –  topepo Jan 15 at 18:43

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