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How can I detect in C# whether two files are absolutely identical (size, content, etc.)?

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3 Answers 3

Here's a simple solution, which just reads both files and compares the data. It should be no slower than the hash method, since both methods will have to read the entire file. EDIT As noted by others, this implementation is actually somewhat slower than the hash method, because of its simplicity. See below for a faster method.

static bool FilesAreEqual( string f1, string f2 )
{
	// get file length and make sure lengths are identical
	long length = new FileInfo( f1 ).Length;
	if( length != new FileInfo( f2 ).Length )
		return false;

	// open both for reading
	using( FileStream stream1 = File.OpenRead( f1 ) )
	using( FileStream stream2 = File.OpenRead( f2 ) )
	{
		// compare content for equality
		int b1, b2;
		while( length-- > 0 )
		{
			b1 = stream1.ReadByte();
			b2 = stream2.ReadByte();
			if( b1 != b2 )
				return false;
		}
	}

	return true;
}

You could modify it to read more than one byte at a time, but the internal file stream should already be buffering the data, so even this simple code should be relatively fast.

EDIT Thanks for the feedback on speed here. I still maintain that the compare-all-bytes method can be just as fast as the MD5 method, since both methods have to read the entire file. I would suspect (but don't know for sure) that once the files have been read, the compare-all-bytes method requires less actual computation. In any case, I duplicated your performance observations for my initial implementation, but when I added some simple buffering, the compare-all-bytes method was just as fast. Below is the buffering implementation, feel free to comment further!

EDIT Jon B makes another good point: in the case where the files actually are different, this method can stop as soon as it finds the first different byte, whereas the hash method has to read the entirety of both files in every case.

static bool FilesAreEqualFaster( string f1, string f2 )
{
	// get file length and make sure lengths are identical
	long length = new FileInfo( f1 ).Length;
	if( length != new FileInfo( f2 ).Length )
		return false;

	byte[] buf1 = new byte[4096];
	byte[] buf2 = new byte[4096];

	// open both for reading
	using( FileStream stream1 = File.OpenRead( f1 ) )
	using( FileStream stream2 = File.OpenRead( f2 ) )
	{
		// compare content for equality
		int b1, b2;
		while( length > 0 )
		{
			// figure out how much to read
			int toRead = buf1.Length;
			if( toRead > length )
				toRead = (int)length;
			length -= toRead;

			// read a chunk from each and compare
			b1 = stream1.Read( buf1, 0, toRead );
			b2 = stream2.Read( buf2, 0, toRead );
			for( int i = 0; i < toRead; ++i )
				if( buf1[i] != buf2[i] )
					return false;
		}
	}

	return true;
}
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What I particularly like about this is that you'll catch a binary difference early on when comparing large files of the same length. –  Jon B Oct 17 '08 at 17:58

You might compare an MD5 hash of each file.

    static bool FilesAreEqual(string fileName1, string fileName2)
    {
        bool equal = new FileInfo(fileName1).Length == new FileInfo(fileName2).Length;

        if (equal)
        {
            byte[] a = GetFileHash(fileName1);
            byte[] b = GetFileHash(fileName2);

            for (int i = 0; i < a.Length; i++)
            {
                if (a[i] != b[i])
                {
                    equal = false;
                    break;
                }
            }
        }

        return equal;
    }

    static byte[] GetFileHash(string fileName)
    {
        using (FileStream fs = new FileStream(fileName, FileMode.Open))
        {
            return System.Security.Cryptography.MD5.Create().ComputeHash(fs);
        }
    }


Update

I tested my function and the compare-all-bytes method against a 3.3MB jpg file (used the same file as both file 1 and file 2). The hash method is twice as fast as comparing all bytes. -> Redacted - performance increase in compare-all-bytes method demonstrated with a 4K buffer.

Although you can design an instance where the MD5 hash will be the same for two different files, I believe the odds of this happening in the wild are low enough to disregard (unless this is a security issue).

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To help with performance I would recommend the first step is just to compare the byte sizes of the two files. If different then you are finished and so do need to calculat the hash. If identical sizes then do the above code. –  Phil Wright Oct 17 '08 at 3:53
    
Is calculating MD5 faster than byte-for-byte comparison? Wouldn't it still read all the bytes and do some more calculations to get the hash? If so, wouldn't byte-for-byte be faster? –  Samuel Kim Oct 17 '08 at 4:22
    
-1 An identical MD5 hash does not guarantee the files are identical: mscs.dal.ca/~selinger/md5collision. –  Joe Oct 17 '08 at 6:53
    
As Joe said, you cannot have absolute certainty that all the hashes you create will be unique. The most accurate method would be to check each file byte by byte for equality. –  SemiColon Oct 17 '08 at 8:27
1  
The only explaination that the hash code is faster is either 1) the file read code is better optimized in the hash case or 2) you did an unfair comparison and forgot stuff like disk caching etc. Read+compare will ALWAYS be less work than Read+calculate-hash+compare. By definition –  Isak Savo Oct 17 '08 at 18:07

Or you can compare the two files byte-for-byte....

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It's faster for ONLY 2 files than hash code computing. You got one. –  TcKs Oct 17 '08 at 8:45

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