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My question is a simple one and is specifically targeted at C# with CLR.

First of all we got code snippet 1:

public void f(SomeClass sc)
{
   anExistingInstance.FieldOfSomeClass = sc;
}

and now code snippet 2:

public void f()
{
  SomeClass sc = new SomeClass();
  anExisitingInstance.FieldOfSomeClass = sc;
}

At code 1, when the method which called f and defined sc is over, I'm guessing that sc gets released and that's why anExisitingInstance.FieldOfSomeClass is no longer valid.

My question is why doesn't the same thing happen at code 2 but with the method f itself? Why when f is done, anExisitingInstance.FieldOfSomeClass still holds a correct value?

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closed as unclear what you're asking by Eric Lippert, Mansfield, asawyer, David, Ed Bayiates Jan 14 at 18:29

Please clarify your specific problem or add additional details to highlight exactly what you need. As it's currently written, it’s hard to tell exactly what you're asking. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

2  
Since your question is based on an incorrect understanding of garbage collection it is impossible to answer. Since your description of what happens in code 1 is wrong, asking "why doesn't the same thing happen in code 2?" is not a sensible question. –  Eric Lippert Jan 13 at 23:46
1  
Your guess is completely incorrect; when sc goes out of scope the value of the field FieldOfSomeClass does not become invalid. So asking "why doesn't the same thing happen in the second case?" is a nonsensical question; it doesn't happen in the first case! I suggest that you take your own advice; when someone on StackOverflow leaves you a comment on one of your questions, that person probably knows more about the subject than you do, so you should stop and think hard about their advice before you criticize it. –  Eric Lippert Jan 14 at 14:47
1  
My next piece of good advice to you is: when all the commenters and answerers are unable to reproduce the problem you are seeing, you have not given enough information in the question. Provide a small, complete program that clearly demonstrates the problem you are having. By doing so you will either (1) solve the problem yourself, because it will become obvious in the smaller version, or (2) make a program that an expert can understand and explain to you. As it stands, this question is not answerable because it doesn't have enough information. –  Eric Lippert Jan 14 at 14:51

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The only entity that matters in your example is anExistingInstance. We don't know where it's defined and who holds the reference to it, but this object holds a reference to the SomeClass instance. It doesn't matter who created the SomeClass instance, just that anExistingInstance holds a reference to it. Some other class probably holds a reference to anExistingInstane, and so forth down the chain until you reach a GC root.

As long as your instance of SomeClass is linked back to a GC root, it won't be garbage collected. Once any link in this chain is no longer linked to a GC root (let's say, someone released the reference to anExistingInstance, all the objects referenced by it (which aren't referenced by something else) are eligible for garbage collection.

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What you wrote is a little bit conflicting with code 1 in my question doesn't it? In that code we also got the anExistingInstance (which is indeed referenced elsewhere) which then holds the reference to SomeClass. And you wrote: "As long as your instance of SomeClass is linked back to a GC root, it won't be garbage collected.". Well so it's in the existing instance... –  Yonatan Nir Jan 13 at 21:29
    
@YonatanNir We cannot help you any further without you providing your "test code". Your test determines the scope for anExistingInstance. –  Simon Whitehead Jan 13 at 21:53

At code 1, when the method which called f and defined sc is over, I'm guessing that sc gets released and that's why anExisitingInstance.FieldOfSomeClass is no longer valid.

No. When anExistingInstance is out of scope.. then all of its fields are also no longer reachable (unless referenced by another object too). Therefore, sc is only eligible for garbage collection after anExistingInstance is no longer in scope.

If objects were collected when their parent/rooting objects were still in scope.. there would be 10000000 times more NullReferenceExceptions thrown in your code.

My question is why doesn't the same thing happen at code 2 but with the method f itself? Why when f is done, anExisitingInstance.FieldOfSomeClass still holds a correct value?

Its the same. Even though sc is created in that method.. it is now rooted by the anExistingInstance object. Once anExistingInstance is out of scope.. sc is also eligible for garbage collection.

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I still don't really see the difference between code 1 and 2 regarding what you wrote. At both cases sc is referenced at the anExistingInstance but at code 1 the object was released for some reason while with code 2 it wasn't. Why? –  Yonatan Nir Jan 13 at 21:51
    
You would have to provide us your testing code to answer that. Your testing code determines how long anExistingInstance is in scope. –  Simon Whitehead Jan 13 at 21:52

My question is why doesn't the same thing happen at code 2 but with the method f itself?

Because the class that contains the method f hasn't been disposed yet. See, in the first case somebody else created sc so it was able to dispose it--but in the second case you created sc inside the method. It's going to stay in scope while the class that created it is in scope.

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This reads incorrectly. Are you able to rephrase? –  Simon Whitehead Jan 13 at 21:08
    
@SimonWhitehead, I can certainly rephrase it if you have a specific suggestion. –  Michael Perrenoud Jan 13 at 21:09
    
You appear to be referring to the enclosing class.. rather than the OP's misconception about local variables within the method. Perhaps I'm just reading it incorrectly :/ (only just got my coffee this morning.. need to give the caffeine time to kick in :)) –  Simon Whitehead Jan 13 at 21:16
    
Your use of the term "disposed" seems to indicate that this is somehow related to IDisposable, which it isn't. I'd suggest using a different term to avoid confusion. –  Servy Jan 13 at 21:41
    
I didn't write this in the question itself because I didn't know it's relevant, but method f is a private method which is being called by another method in the same class as f. –  Yonatan Nir Jan 13 at 21:54

Why when f is done, anExisitingInstance.FieldOfSomeClass still holds a correct value?

Object is garbage collected when there are no references to it. In both cases there is an object anExisitingInstance that holds a reference to SomeClass. And will be gc'ed when anExisitingInstance gc'es.

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But it happens only at code 1. With code 2 it doesn't happen. –  Yonatan Nir Jan 13 at 21:52
    
It should be.... Can you post the whole code related to these methods? Apparently we're missing smth –  Alex Denysenko Jan 14 at 13:04

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