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public class Test {
    private ExecutorService executor = Executors.newFixedThreadPool(50);

    public void startTenThreads() {
        for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++) {
            executor.execute(new FooWorker(i));
        }
    }

    private final class FooWorker implements Runnable {
        private int threadNum;

        public FooWorker(int threadNum) {
            this.threadNum = threadNum;
        }

        public void run() {
            System.out.println("Thread " + threadNum + " starting");
            Thread.sleep(60000);
            System.out.println("Thread " + threadNum + " finished");
        }
    }
}

I want these threads to run in parallel, however the output shows it is not running in parallel, but rather sequentially:

Thread 1 starting
Thread 1 finished
Thread 2 starting
Thread 2 finished
Thread 3 starting
Thread 3 finished
Thread 4 starting
Thread 4 finished
Thread 5 starting
Thread 5 finished
...

What am I doing wrong?

EDIT: Found the problem, somebody had set the thread pool size to 1. This snippet code works fine

share|improve this question
4  
Because you tasks take such a sort time to complete that they execute before the next loop iteration. You need to provide threads with more work - a random sleep perhaps. Also look at invokeAll. –  Boris the Spider Jan 13 at 22:37
    
You need to print a ton more lines. You are dealing with race conditions and the threads are finishing too fast. –  Gray Jan 13 at 22:38
    
I put Thread.sleep(60000) and it still prints in the same order –  Popcorn Jan 13 at 22:42
2  
as Boris the Spider said try , public void run() { System.out.println("Thread " + threadNum + " starting"); try { Thread.sleep(100); } catch (InterruptedException e) { e.printStackTrace(); } System.out.println("Thread " + threadNum + " finished"); } It worked for me –  upog Jan 13 at 22:44
    
It doesn't compile if you just add sleep the way you did. Can you give us the actual code? –  Peter Lawrey Jan 13 at 22:46

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Your code as written doesn't compile. I'm guessing you have something else going on in code that you did not cut/paste here. Here is your code written to compile. I tested it and it works for me. What is the difference between your actual code and the code below? (Please excuse the typo in "TheadTest".)

import java.util.concurrent.ExecutorService;
import java.util.concurrent.Executors;

public class TheadTest {

    private ExecutorService executor = Executors.newFixedThreadPool(50);

    public void startTenThreads() {
        for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++) {
            executor.execute(new FooWorker(i));
        }
    }

    private final class FooWorker implements Runnable {
        private int threadNum;

        public FooWorker(int threadNum) {
            this.threadNum = threadNum;
        }

        public void run() {
            try {
                System.out.println("Thread " + threadNum + " starting");
                Thread.sleep(60000);
                System.out.println("Thread " + threadNum + " finished");
            }
            catch (InterruptedException e) {
                e.printStackTrace();
            }
        }
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        TheadTest tt = new TheadTest();
        tt.startTenThreads();
    }

}
share|improve this answer
    
There's a lot of differences so I don't think I can paste all of it. I'm still trying to figure this out, but the gist is I'm sending http requests with apache http client and I want them to all run in parallel. I think it may have to do with using HttpClient instead of AsyncHttpClient. Still looking into it –  Popcorn Jan 13 at 22:57

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