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I'm having trouble mapping a certain JSON string to a Dictionary<T, T2> using JSON.NET.

My JSON string looks like this:

{
  "map_waypoint": { "file_id": 157353, "signature": "32633AF8ADEA696A1EF56D3AE32D617B10D3AC57" },
  "map_waypoint_contested": { "file_id": 102349, "signature": "5EF051273B40CFAC4AEA6C1F1D0DA612C1B0776C" },
  "map_waypoint_hover": { "file_id": 157354, "signature": "95CE3F6B0502232AD90034E4B7CE6E5B0FD3CC5F" }
}

Rather than making 3 identical classes for each object, I made 1 class Asset that works for all of them:

public class Asset
{
    /// <summary>
    /// Initializes a new instance of the <see cref="Asset"/> class.
    /// </summary>
    public Asset()
    {
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Initializes a new instance of the <see cref="Asset"/> class.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="fileId">The file ID.</param>
    /// <param name="signature">The file signature.</param>
    [JsonConstructor]
    public Asset(string fileId, string signature)
    {
        this.FileId = fileId;
        this.Signature = signature;
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Gets the file ID to be used with the render service.
    /// </summary>
    [JsonProperty("file_id")]
    public string FileId { get; private set; }

    /// <summary>
    /// Gets file signature to be used with the render service.
    /// </summary>
    [JsonProperty("signature")]
    public string Signature { get; private set; }

    /// <summary>
    /// Gets the JSON representation of this instance.
    /// </summary>
    /// <returns>Returns a JSON <see cref="String"/>.</returns>
    public override string ToString()
    {
        return JsonConvert.SerializeObject(this);
    }
}

Now in another class FilesResponse, I'm keeping a property Files of type Dictionary<String, Asset>.

public class FilesResponse
{
    /// <summary>
    /// Initializes a new instance of the <see cref="FilesResponse"/> class.
    /// </summary>
    public FilesResponse()
    {
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Initializes a new instance of the <see cref="FilesResponse"/> class.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="files">A collection of assets by their name.</param>
    [JsonConstructor]
    public FilesResponse(Dictionary<string, Asset> files)
    {
        this.Files = files;
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Gets the collection of assets by their name.
    /// </summary>
    [JsonProperty]
    public Dictionary<string, Asset> Files { get;  private set; }

    /// <summary>
    /// Gets the JSON representation of this instance.
    /// </summary>
    /// <returns>Returns a JSON <see cref="String"/>.</returns>
    public override string ToString()
    {
        return JsonConvert.SerializeObject(this);
    }
}

The thing is that I'm not quite sure how to let JSON.NET know that the data from my JSON string should go inside the dictionary...?

Ideally, I'd like to be able to do this:

var filesResponse = JsonConvert.DeserializeObject<FilesResponse>(jsonString);

foreach (var file in filesResponse.Files)
{
    Console.WriteLine("Name = {0}, ID = {1}", file.Key, file.Value.FileId);
}

Can I make this work somehow?

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You need to implement your own converter if you want to have GUIDs. I end up with something like this.

public class StringGuidConverter: JsonConverter {
    public override bool CanConvert(Type objectType) {
        return objectType == typeof(string);
    }

    public override object ReadJson(JsonReader reader, Type objectType, object existingValue, JsonSerializer serializer) {
        return new Guid((string)reader.Value);
    }

    public override void WriteJson(JsonWriter writer, object value, JsonSerializer serializer) {
        writer.WriteValue(((Guid)value).ToString("N"));
    }
}

public class Asset {
    /// <summary>
    /// Initializes a new instance of the <see cref="Asset"/> class.
    /// </summary>
    public Asset() {
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Initializes a new instance of the <see cref="Asset"/> class.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="fileId">The file ID.</param>
    /// <param name="signature">The file signature.</param>
    [JsonConstructor]
    public Asset(string fileId, Guid signature) {
        this.FileId = fileId;
        this.Signature = signature;
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Gets the file ID to be used with the render service.
    /// </summary>
    [JsonProperty("file_id")]
    public string FileId { get; private set; }

    /// <summary>
    /// Gets file signature to be used with the render service.
    /// </summary>
    [JsonProperty("signature")]
    [JsonConverter(typeof(StringGuidConverter))]
    public Guid Signature { get; private set; }

    /// <summary>
    /// Gets the JSON representation of this instance.
    /// </summary>
    /// <returns>Returns a JSON <see cref="String"/>.</returns>
    public override string ToString() {
        return JsonConvert.SerializeObject(this);
    }
}

public class FilesResponse {
    /// <summary>
    /// Initializes a new instance of the <see cref="FilesResponse"/> class.
    /// </summary>
    public FilesResponse() {
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Initializes a new instance of the <see cref="FilesResponse"/> class.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="files">A collection of assets by their name.</param>
    [JsonConstructor]
    public FilesResponse(Dictionary<string, Asset> files) {
        this.Files = files;
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Gets the collection of assets by their name.
    /// </summary>
    [JsonProperty]
    public Dictionary<string, Asset> Files { get; private set; }

    /// <summary>
    /// Gets the JSON representation of this instance.
    /// </summary>
    /// <returns>Returns a JSON <see cref="String"/>.</returns>
    public override string ToString() {
        return JsonConvert.SerializeObject(this);
    }
}

class Test {
    public static void Run() {
        var json = @"{
  ""map_waypoint"": { ""file_id"": 157353, ""signature"": ""32633AF8ADEA696AE32D617B10D3AC57"" },
  ""map_waypoint_contested"": { ""file_id"": 102349, ""signature"": ""32633AF8ADEA696AE32D617B10D3AC57"" },
  ""map_waypoint_hover"": { ""file_id"": 157354, ""signature"": ""32633AF8ADEA696AE32D617B10D3AC57"" }
}";


        var result2 = JsonConvert.DeserializeObject<FilesResponse>(json);
        var result3 = new FilesResponse(JsonConvert.DeserializeObject<Dictionary<string, Asset>>(json));
    }
}

Unfotunatelly result2 does not work

EDIT Btw. your data are incorrect. GUIDs are 32-chars long and you have 40-chars long. That's the reason I had to modify the test data.

EDIT2

I would make FilesResponse inherit from a dictionary, like this:

public class FilesResponse2: Dictionary<string, Asset>
{
    /// <summary>
    /// Initializes a new instance of the <see cref="FilesResponse"/> class.
    /// </summary>
    public FilesResponse2() {
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Gets the collection of assets by their name.
    /// </summary>
    public Dictionary<string, Asset> Files { get { return this; } }

    /// <summary>
    /// Gets the JSON representation of this instance.
    /// </summary>
    /// <returns>Returns a JSON <see cref="String"/>.</returns>
    public override string ToString() {
        return JsonConvert.SerializeObject(this);
    }
}

// deserialization:
var result22 = JsonConvert.DeserializeObject<FilesResponse2>(json);
share|improve this answer
    
You're right. But I really, really want to make result2 work. –  Steven Liekens Jan 14 '14 at 0:17
    
Thanks for pointing out that these signatures aren't GUIDs though. I was under the impression that they were, but they aren't. –  Steven Liekens Jan 14 '14 at 0:18
    
@Steven Liekens: Is it possible for FilesResponse to inherit from a dictionary? –  SOReader Jan 14 '14 at 0:26
    
It is, and I know that I can make that work. Alternatively I can make a property of type Asset for each object and tag those properties with a [JsonPropertyAttribute]. But really, I'd much rather have all of the data sit inside a single Files dictionary. –  Steven Liekens Jan 14 '14 at 0:26
1  
You know what? The developers on the other end of the line should've designed their JSON to be an array if they wanted me to use collection types. I'll just go ahead and add a property for each object individually. –  Steven Liekens Jan 14 '14 at 0:40

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