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I'm new here so really sorry if this is to basic but what am I missing here? This is just a dummy code:

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

int main() {
    unsigned int a, b, c;
    int d;
    a = 10E06;
    b = 25E06;
    c = 4096;
    d = (a - b)/c;
    std::cout << d << std::endl;
    return 0;
}

cout is printing 1044913 instead of -3662. If I cast a and b to long the problem is solved. Is there a problem of overflow or something?

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2  
Are you compiling with warnings turned on? No? Why not? – Luchian Grigore Jan 14 '14 at 0:04
    
What is that, scientific notation? Hex numbers are usually preceded by 0x – Robert Harvey Jan 14 '14 at 0:04
1  
Why do you think it is related to division? – juanchopanza Jan 14 '14 at 0:07
6  
remove the unsigned and you'll get the expected result. ideone.com/rBt9Kz – Gabriel L. Jan 14 '14 at 0:07
    
@RobertHarvey: Yes, it's scientific notation. 10E06 is a valid literal of type double; it's implicitly converted to unsigned int. In this particular case there's likely to be no loss of precision as long as unsigned int is 32 bits or wider, but it's bad practice. (Some languages support exponential notation for integer literals; C++ does not.) – Keith Thompson Jan 14 '14 at 0:12

That's because (a-b) itself is unsigned:

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

int main() {
    unsigned int a, b, c;
    int d;
    a = 10E06;
    b = 25E06;
    c = 4096;
    d = (a - b)/c;
    std::cout << (a-b) << std::endl; // 4279967296
    std::cout << d << std::endl; // 1044913 
    return 0;
}

The conversion from unsigned to int happens when d is assigned to, not before.

So (a-b)/c must be unsigned since a,b,c are.

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Operations between unsigned numbers yield unsigned numbers. It's up to you to make sure the operations make sense, or protect against the opposite.

If you have unsigned int a = 2, b = 3;, what do you think the value of a-b would be?

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Since a b and c are all declared as unsigned, the output of the computation (a-b)/c will be unsigned. Since the calculation of the values you provided cannot be properly represented with an unsigned type, things get a little messy. The unsigned value is then assigned to d, and even though this is signed, the value is already garbled.

I will also note that the notation 10E06 represents a floating point number that is then being implicitly cast to an unsigned int. Depending on the particular floating point value provided, this may or may not cast as expected.

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You want your result to take a sign. So you should declare your variables as signed int or just int. That will give the desired result. If you cast a and b to long, a-b will be long and hence take a sign. Following is a solution.

int main() {
    int a, b, c;
    int d;
    a = 10E06;
    b = 25E06;
    c = 4096;
    d = (a - b)/c;
    std::cout << d << std::endl;
    return 0;
}

If you also want rational numbers you should use doubles or float (atlhough it won't give a different result for this particular case).

int main() {
    double a, b, c;
    double d;
    a = 10E06;
    b = 25E06;
    c = 4096;
    d = (a - b)/c;
    std::cout << d << std::endl;
    return 0;
}
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Because of the way C++ (and many other C-based languages) deal with operators, when unsigned numbers are put into an expression, that expression returns an unsigned value, and not held in a mysterious inter-type state that might be expected.

Step-by-step:

  • (a - b) subtracts 25E06 from 10E06, which would normally return -15E06, is unsigned, so it's wrapped around to a whole bunch of junk.
  • This junk is then divided by c, and both inputs are unsigned, so the output is also unsigned.
  • Lastly, this is stuffed into a signed int, remaining at 1044913.

"unsigned int" is a type just like float and bool, even though it requires two keywords. If you want it to turn into a signed int for that calculation, you must either make sure a, b, and c are all signed (remove the unsigned keyword), or cast them as such when putting them into the expression, like this: d = ((signed)a - (signed)b) / (signed)c;

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