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I was hoping that if I were to define constants in a separate namespace, like:

namespace config\database\mysql;

const HOST = 'localhost';
const USER = 'testusr';
const PASSWORD = 'testpwd';
const NAME = 'testdb';

That I would be able to use __autoload to automatically include them:

function __autoload($className)
{
    echo "Autoload: {$className}\n";
    $class_file = str_replace('\\', '/', $className) . ".php";
    if(file_exists($class_file)) {
        include $class_file;
    }
}

echo config\database\mysql\HOST;

This, however, does not work. The __autoload is not called for the constant as it is with classes, leaving me with a Undefined constant error.

Some way that I can simulate the class __autoload for constants?

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2 Answers

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Try this (worked on my server):

<?php
namespace config\database\mysql;

class Mysql
{
    const HOST = 'localhost';
    const USER = 'testusr';
    const PASSWORD = 'testpwd';
    const NAME = 'testdb';
}
?>

<?php
function __autoload($className)
{
    echo "Autoload: {$className}\n";
    $class_file = str_replace('\\', '/', $className) . ".php";
    if(file_exists($class_file)) {
        include $class_file;
    }
}

echo config\database\mysql\Mysql::HOST;
?>

Basically you need to create a class to act as a wrapper for the constants but by doing so it allows __autoload() to work as you intended.

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Thanks! This looks promising. I'm not to fond of having to wrap them up in dummy classes though, but it seems to work. –  Atli Jan 21 '10 at 16:00
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Using an undefined constant will throw a PHP warning.

You can write a custom error handler to catch the warning and load in the appropriate constants file.

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That's not what Atli is asking... –  Alix Axel Jan 21 '10 at 15:39
    
Thanks for the suggestion. Unfortunately the Undefiend constant error is a fatal error (E_ERROR), which a custom handler can't catch. –  Atli Jan 21 '10 at 15:42
    
Hmm. Sure it used to be a notice, but I'm not using 5.3. –  Mike Jan 21 '10 at 15:45
    
Wouldn't have worked anyway. Just gave it a try in 5.2 and, of course, the line triggering the error has already been processed so the constant definition isn't picked up until the next line. Hope you get a solution. –  Mike Jan 21 '10 at 15:59
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