Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I need to check if there exists an instance of class_A ,and if there does exist, get that instance.

How to do it in PHP?

As always, I think a simple example is best.

Now my problem has become:

$ins = new class_A();

How to store the instance in a static member variable of class_A when instantiating?

It'll be better if the instance can be stored when calling __construct(). Say, it should work without limitation on how it's instantiated.

share|improve this question
1  
There's no magic way to find an object, knowing only its class. You're going to have to put your instance somewhere you can find it later. – Frank Farmer Jan 21 '10 at 15:51
1  
With at least eight answers and Singleton, Registry and instanceof, etc all mentioned, you might want to be more precise about what you are trying to do. – Gordon Jan 21 '10 at 16:52

11 Answers 11

up vote 19 down vote accepted

What you have described is essentially the singleton pattern. Please see this question for good reasons why you might not want to do this.

If you really want to do it, you could implement something like this:

class a {
    public static $instance;
    public function __construct() {
        self::$instance = $this;
    }

    public static function get() {
        if (self::$instance === null) {
            self::$instance = new self();
        }
        return self::$instance;
    }
}

$a = a::get();
share|improve this answer
    
Oh,it's working!+1 – user198729 Jan 21 '10 at 16:59
1  
$this is the current object. self is the current class - which you use for accessing static members. – Tom Haigh Jan 21 '10 at 17:03
1  
What is the UseCase for this? – Gordon Jan 21 '10 at 17:10
    
@Gordon,It's for templating engine.I use extract to populate PHP variables in template file.But I also need to populate the javascript variables,which can't be achieved with extract,but insert <script> at proper places,so I need a solution to get my instance in template file.Hopefully I've answered your question. – user198729 Jan 21 '10 at 17:13
1  
@unknown that sounds completely wrong and I still don't understand what you'd need the above code for. But I don't have to understand it, so go ahead :) – Gordon Jan 21 '10 at 17:19

What you ask for is impossible (Well, perhaps not in a technical sense, but highly impractical). It suggests that you have a deeper misunderstanding about the purpose of objects and classes.

share|improve this answer
7  
+1 - I think you've hit the nail on the head. – Karl B Jan 21 '10 at 16:37
    
This is a common use case for the Singleton pattern, which is indeed possible to implement in PHP. – feeela Apr 8 '13 at 10:03

You should implement the Singleton pattern. http://www.developertutorials.com/tutorials/php/php-singleton-design-pattern-050729/page1.html

share|improve this answer
    
If class_A is a class over which the user doesn't have control, the singleton pattern may be impossible to apply. – Dathan Jan 21 '10 at 15:49
    
class_A doesn't have to become the singleton. You could create a class_B that holds a single class_A. – Frank Farmer Jan 21 '10 at 15:52
    
That works if the user is going to be responsible for the instantiation of class_A, and can ensure that it's done through class_B. What if the instance of class_A is generated by some other piece of code that's unaware of class_B? – Dathan Jan 21 '10 at 15:54
6  
@Dathan Then you're pretty screwed. – meagar Jan 21 '10 at 15:55

The singleton pattern, with a PHP example from Wikipedia that I've added a "checkExists" method to, as it sounds like you want to check for the existence of the class without necessarily creating it if it doesn't exit:

final class Singleton 
{
    protected static $_instance;

    protected function __construct() # we don't permit an explicit call of the constructor! (like $v = new Singleton())
    { }

    protected function __clone() # we don't permit cloning the singleton (like $x = clone $v)
    { }

    public static function getInstance() 
    {
      if( self::$_instance === NULL ) {
        self::$_instance = new self();
      }
      return self::$_instance;
    }

    public static function checkExists() 
    {
      return self::$_instance;
    }
}

if(Singleton::checkExists())
   $instance = Singleton::getInstance();
share|improve this answer
    
I don't see how Singleton::getInstance() will return an existing instance.There is no operation on self::$_instance in __construct() – user198729 Jan 21 '10 at 16:07
    
I've created the instance this way somewhere:$ins = new class_A(),so I need Singleton::getInstance() to work in this case – user198729 Jan 21 '10 at 16:16
    
Why can't you change $ins = new class_A(); to $ins = Singleton::getInstance()? – Karl B Jan 21 '10 at 16:23
    
There will be too many places to change.So it'll be better if the instance can be stored when calling __construct() – user198729 Jan 21 '10 at 16:28
    
If there are too many places to change, then it's likely that there'll be more than one instance in existence at any time, in which case the original question doesn't make much sense. – Karl B Jan 21 '10 at 16:33

Maybe you want something like

for (get_defined_vars() as $key=>$value)
{
  if ($value instanceof class_A)
    return $value;
}

EDIT: Upon further reading, you have to jump through some hoops to get object references. So you might want return $$key; instead of return $value;. Or some other tricks to get a reference to the object.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes,that's what I want,but I also care about the performance – user198729 Jan 21 '10 at 15:54
2  
This is exactly what the OP asked for, I just hope you don't get down-voted for this one. – Alix Axel Jan 21 '10 at 15:55
    
@unknown (google): There is no magic bullet for that... And it can get worse if you want it to handle recursion (objects inside multi-dimensional arrays). – Alix Axel Jan 21 '10 at 15:57
1  
@unknown, I believe that without being able to apply one of the other patterns described (which will require you to either control instantiation of the object or modify the object itself), this is the best you can do. However, you can merge the above with the registry pattern, so you only have to take the performance hit once. – Dathan Jan 21 '10 at 15:58
2  
The code above won't work. There is no vars inside the function scope (plus it has syntax errors). – Gordon Jan 21 '10 at 16:05

if ($object instanceof class_A)

See PHP manual: Classes and objects

share|improve this answer
    
I don't have direct access to $object – user198729 Jan 21 '10 at 15:43

I think what you want is the Registry Pattern

share|improve this answer

To expand on Pikrass answer, you basically will want to do something like this:

class class_A {
  private static $instance = false;

  public static function getInstance() {
    if (!self::$instance) {
      self::$instance = new class_A();
    }

    return self::$instance;
  }

  // actual class implementation goes here
}


// where you need to use the instance:
$mySingleton = class_A::getInstance();
// do something with $mySingleton
share|improve this answer
    
I need to get already existing instance,not create – user198729 Jan 21 '10 at 15:52

Remember that by using a singleton, you're basically creating a big global variable. If it's got state that changes, your code can become unpredictable. So use caution.

share|improve this answer

If the replacement of the singleton instantiation instrucion in your files is a problem you may turn into a constant-driven behaviour: constants are such for all the duration of the script, so in case of an instance which requirement is to be unique (for all the script duration) the construction method may be properly linked to the existence/value of a constant.

class superObject {
    public function __construct() {
        if (defined('SUPER_OBJECT')) {
            trigger_error('Super object '.__CLASS__.' already instantiated', E_USER_ERROR);
                    // ...or just do whatever you want to do in case of instances overlap
        } else {
            define('SUPER_OBJECT', true);
        }
    // the rest of your construct method
    // ...
    }
}
share|improve this answer

The code below has a caching quality that promotes efficiency:

class Object {

  public $instance_variable;
  public $last_added_global_variable;

  public function __construct(){
    //we are saving the global variable before this one so that
    //we can be confident that we will always get the correct value
    $this->last_added_global_variable = $this->get_last_variable_added()[count($array_of_global_variables)-1];
  }

  //runs everytime a function is called in this class
  public function __call(){
    //remember, this is skipped whenever the variable name is saved
    if(!$this->instance_variable){
      for($i=0; $i=count($this->get_last_variable_added()); $i++){
        if($this->last_added_global_variable == get_last_variable_added()[$i]){
          $this->instance_variable = get_last_variable_added()[$i+1];
        }
      }
    }
  }

  private function get_last_variable_added(){
    $array_of_global_variables = array();

    foreach($GLOBALS as $g=>$v){
      array_push($array_of_global_variables, $g);
    }

    //return last added global variable
    return $array_of_global_variables;
  }

}

Although appearing costly, it is negligible.

You may note that finding the last added variable through a global-variable loop is impossible while still in the constructing function.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.