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I have written following code

class Test {

  public static void main(String... args) throws Exception{   

    Set<Integer> s = new HashSet();
    Integer i1 = new Integer(1);
    s.add(i1);
    Integer i2 = new Integer(2);
    s.add(i2);
    i1 = 5;
    s.remove(i1);
    System.out.println("size= "+s.size());
  }
}

Output: 2

I have added two integers(i1 and i2) in set and i1 is modified. When s.remove(i1) is there, output is 2

when I comment out s.remove(i1) still output is 2.

Why this is so.How it is working in background.

Thnaks in advance!

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6 Answers 6

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Integer objects are immutable objects and hence any change to them will create a new object. So when you change

i1 = 5;

the original i1 which was stored in set is not changed. As i1 now holds the reference of a different object, which is not present in Set so calling

s.remove(i1);

will have no effect i.e. it does not remove anything and the size of the set remains 2. To confirm whether remove has removed anything or not, you can use boolean return value of remove method. It will return true if the value is removed. So try this:

if(s.remove(i1)) {
    System.out.println("i1 removed");
} else {
   System.out.println("i1 NOT removed");
}
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1  
Immutability is irrelevant. Exactly the same thing would have happened if the variables had been List references, as long as the final assignment to i1 was of a reference to an object that is not equal to any element in the set. –  Patricia Shanahan Jan 14 at 17:03

This line

i1 = 5;

is actually compiled to

i1 = Integer.valueOf(5);

So after execution, i1 is holding another (new) reference, with a value that is not in the HashSet, so nothing is removed.

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I know what you were trying to get at here, but ... it's a HashSet. remove() isn't looking at reference values ;) –  Brian Roach Jan 14 at 4:41
    
@BrianRoach Ah, excuse the wording. –  Sotirios Delimanolis Jan 14 at 4:43
    
My point was the second bit; i1 = 2; remove(i1) would most certainly remove ithe Integer with the value 2 from the HashSet –  Brian Roach Jan 14 at 4:44
    
@BrianRoach Oh yeah, it is kind of (completely) pointless. –  Sotirios Delimanolis Jan 14 at 4:45
  1. Java Primitives types can only have VALUES.
  2. While Java Boxed types have VALUES and IDENTITIES.
  3. Two Java Boxed types can have same VALUE but different IDENTITIES.
  4. Java Boxed types are IMMUTABLE; any change in their VALUE will also change the IDENTITY.
  5. If IDENTITY of an object is changed; Java collections cant work effectively.
  6. Statement: i1 = 5; => is actually i1 = Integer.ValueOf(5) => which meant new VALUE of i1.
  7. Collections store only IDENTITY but not VALUE.
  8. Removal by non existing IDENTITY (i1 = 5) from collection, will result nothing.

Source ..... Effective Java by Joshua Bloch

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Collections (Set is a collection) in java works with the 'equals()' method, not with the '=' reference operator. That is, when you set 'i1=5', and then 's.remove(i1)', the remove method will compare with all elements.

a) Beginning with the first: is 5 equal to 1?. No, so don't remove that element.

b) The second: is 5 equal to 2?. No, so don't remove that element.

Adding duplicate works the same, on an empty set:

i1=1;
i2=1;
s.add(i1);
s.add(i2)

This will result on a set with only 1 element, because 'i1.equals(i2)' is true, and doesn't matter that 'i1=i2' is NOT true.

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It is very important to distinguish between objects and reference variables. A reference expression, including a reference variable, is either null or a pointer to some object.

The HashSet contains its own pointers to the objects in the set it represents. Working through the code:

Set<Integer> s = new HashSet();
// s is a pointer to a new, empty, HashSet.
Integer i1 = new Integer(1);
// i2 is a pointer to an Integer object with value 1
s.add(i1);
// The set contains one Integer object, value 1
Integer i2 = new Integer(2);
s.add(i2);
// The set contains two Integer objects, values 1 and 2
i1 = 5;
// i1 is a pointer to an Integer object with value 5
s.remove(i1);
// The set does not contain any object that is equal 
// to an Integer with value 5 so it is unchanged
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Becase after you do "i1 = 5;", i1 starts pointing to another address. And it is no more the same Integer than is stored in your HashSet.

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