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In my facebook application, I use peoples friends names in the application. I can either get the names from facebook. Or save them the first time the person logs in. So everytime his/her friends received from the database.

Which method is faster?

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Have you tried both options and measured the performance of each? –  bcat Jan 21 '10 at 16:23
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How are you going to synchronize the data when a person gets married and changes surname? –  naivists Jan 21 '10 at 16:24
    
@naivists makes a valid point. It really does not matter which way is faster...if you store these values yourself you lose the benefits of the facebook network. –  Vincent Ramdhanie Jan 21 '10 at 16:25
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I disagree. Firstly, always measure before drawing conclusions. But I would cache the names in a local database with an asynchronous cache-refresh that checks Facebook to keep it up-to-date. –  Joe Jan 21 '10 at 16:27
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As Karl B mentioned, it is strictly against the Facebook developer terms of service to permanently store user information in your own database. Do not do this. –  zombat Jan 21 '10 at 16:51
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3 Answers

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Storing the friends names in the database will almost certainly be faster - Facebook's API is not particularly fast, and since the query needs to go across the internet there's added latency.

However, storying the friends names retrieve directly from the API on first use for more than 24 hours as in breach of the developers terms of service. So you should expect to have to query the API regularly, either on every view of the page or else implement a more complex data caching system of your own.

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+1: This is even more important than being out of sync with them. Good find. –  Chris Lively Jan 21 '10 at 16:30
    
Basically I'm going to store each persons own name. When a person comes I get who is his friends who are playing the application. So it retrieves their names. I'm not storing his friends information in his database. –  Fahim Akhter Jan 21 '10 at 16:34
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Even storing the user's own name is breaking the developer terms. The only away around that is to present the user with a blank text field and ask them to input a name themselves - you can't even have it pre-filled with data from the API. –  Karl B Jan 21 '10 at 16:41
    
+1 - never, ever store Facebook user information in your own database. Implement a local session cache to prevent excessive API querying, but do not store user data permanently. –  zombat Jan 21 '10 at 16:52
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You can cache the results for 24 hours remember, and I know Zynga will have invested in that kind technology. It also helps to have a server that's closer to Facebook's, which generally means either central or western US. –  Karl B Jan 21 '10 at 23:56
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As a rule local Db connections are usualy much faster to access than webservice calls. I would suggest you setup both options and record some time metrics to test this, but keep in mind the response of Facebook is also going to change at diffent times of the day under different loads.

Dont forget the friends list are always changing too, I would suggest you fetch the list in the background on every login to update your database copy too.

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Obviously pulling the names from your local database would be faster.

But that doesn't matter. Being out of sync with facebook is the overriding concern.

Let's say they use the facebook site to remove a friend. Will they then have to click a "sync" button in your app to remove them as well? So my recommendation is not to worry about performance and always get the latest from facebook.

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