Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I have a table with multiple fields for address, such as address_line_1, address_line_2, etc.

Is there any way that I can use a WHERE clause across multiple fields at once, without having to use an OR/AND statement?

For example:

SELECT * 
  FROM FIN_LIVE.CUSTOMER_ADDRESSES 
 WHERE SYS_ADDRESS_1, SYS_ADDRESS_2, SYS_ADDRESS_3 = 'data'
share|improve this question
    
Why don't you want AND/OR statement? –  Tony The Lion Jan 21 '10 at 16:45
    
@Tony: I can understand not wanting to use ORs - they can be expensive. –  OMG Ponies Jan 21 '10 at 16:54
    
Is this separate lines of an address? .. perhaps you'd like to CONCAT_WS() the address fields and compare that to data. Examples of what your data looks like would help a lot to enable people here to give you the most useful and accurate advice. –  JAL Jan 21 '10 at 16:57
    
Code Duck, I think you may be on to something there. I essentially need to find a given address (such as 123 Green St.) within my table, but 123 Green St. could be in 1 of 4 separate address fields, each representing an address line. Sometimes customers put their name on line 1, or the actual street address, so there is no consistency, and I have no control over this. –  Brandon Jan 21 '10 at 18:50

5 Answers 5

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Pretty sure you'll have to use AND/OR

HOWEVER, maybe this is a sign to change your data structure. Are you saying that there are 3 addresses, and any one of them could be 123 Main Street?

In that case, perhaps you need to pull address data out to a separate table.

share|improve this answer
3  
Agreed, this sounds like a strange situation that probably should be recognized as a code smell, or a schema smell, if you wish. –  Alison R. Jan 21 '10 at 16:50
    
@Alison R.: It's common to have at least three address lines for a mailing address. The first line could be Rural Route (RR), or a "care of" (noted as c/o), second could be apt/suite number if separate from the street address. There's no consistent format - dunno if any of the above applies to outside of Canada/US. –  OMG Ponies Jan 21 '10 at 16:53
    
Correct. But based on the initial query, he's asking if any of the three fields contain 'data' I took that mean, do any of the lines contain '123 Main Street' Our addresses in our internal DB have line 1 for street #, line 2 for anything you mentioned there. But we don't keep a 'home address' 'work address' and 'school address' that's what I wanted to make sure wasn't happening here. –  taylonr Jan 21 '10 at 17:37
    
OMG Ponies has it right. There are 4 lines we provide for an address, and the format is not consistent. Sometimes a customer's line 1 will be the company name, or a subdivision, or a contact's name and sometimes it will be the exact address. –  Brandon Jan 21 '10 at 18:44
    
Ah, in that case then, ignore my comment. –  taylonr Jan 21 '10 at 19:17

In MySQL with MyISAM, you can create a FULLTEXT index

CREATE FULLTEXT INDEX fx_customeraddresses_123 ON FIN_LIVE.CUSTOMER_ADDRESSES (SYS_ADDRESS_1, SYS_ADDRESS_2, SYS_ADDRESS_3)

and issue this query:

SELECT  *
FROM    FIN_LIVE.CUSTOMER_ADDRESSES
WHERE   MATCH(SYS_ADDRESS_1, SYS_ADDRESS_2, SYS_ADDRESS_3) AGAINST ('+data')

, which will return all records with the word data in any of the fields.

You can even query it without the index:

SELECT  *
FROM    FIN_LIVE.CUSTOMER_ADDRESSES
WHERE   MATCH(SYS_ADDRESS_1, SYS_ADDRESS_2, SYS_ADDRESS_3) AGAINST ('+data' IN BOOLEAN MODE)

, but this will be much slower.

If you are looking for exact match in any of three fields, you may use this syntax:

SELECT  *
FROM    FIN_LIVE.CUSTOMER_ADDRESSES
WHERE   'data' IN (SYS_ADDRESS_1, SYS_ADDRESS_2, SYS_ADDRESS_3)

(works in all major databases).

share|improve this answer

No, you'll need to use AND/OR.

SELECT * 
FROM FIN_LIVE.CUSTOMER_ADDRESSES 
WHERE SYS_ADDRESS_1 = 'data'
    AND SYS_ADDRESS_2 = 'data'
    AND SYS_ADDRESS_3 = 'data'
share|improve this answer
1  
That would mean that the same value would have to be present in all three columns. Depends on the data, but line addresses are rarely duplicated. –  OMG Ponies Jan 21 '10 at 16:50
    
this will only work if you have a bizarre address. –  gingerbreadboy Jan 21 '10 at 16:55
    
Yes, but what else could the OP be implying with that clause? –  Alison R. Jan 21 '10 at 16:56
2  
He could be implying an OR condition. So for example, if someone is at 123 Maple Drive, that might be in line 1, line 2, or line 3 of the address depending on how they entered it. –  Tom H. Jan 21 '10 at 16:59
    
Ahh, true. So it's like a game of database column whack-a-mole. ;) Answer edited to include the possibility of "OR." At any rate, we've got an XY problem here. perlmonks.org/index.pl?node_id=542341 –  Alison R. Jan 21 '10 at 17:35

If you want to avoid multiple AND statements to only enter the criterion, i.e. SYS_ADDRESS_1 = 'data', once, you could always do:

SELECT * 
  FROM FIN_LIVE.CUSTOMER_ADDRESSES 
 WHERE 
    SYS_ADDRESS_1 = SYS_ADDRESS_2 
    AND SYS_ADDRESS_2 = SYS_ADDRESS_3 
    AND SYS_ADDRESS_3 = 'data'

I'm only pondering why you would want to exclude something as elementary as an AND operator? I don't think I'm alone in that!

share|improve this answer

If you're looking for a row where any one of the columns match then you could do something like this, but it would be horribly inefficient compared to the simple OR statements.

SELECT
     *
FROM
     Customer_Addresses
WHERE
     '|*|' + sys_address_1 + '|*|' + sys_address_2 + '|*|' + sys_address_3 + '|*|' LIKE '%|*|' + @search_string + '|*|%'

I'll leave it as an exercise to the reader to turn this into an AND statement :)

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.