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Can someone please explain why this code is taking so long to run (i.e. >24 hours): The number of rows is 5000, whilst the number of columns is 2000 (i.e. Approximately 10m loops).

Is there a better way to do this????

for (int i = 0; i < m.rows; i++)
{
    for (int j = 0; j < m.cols; j++)
    {
        textToWrite += m[i, j].ToString() + ",";
    }
    //remove the final comma.
    textToWrite = textToWrite.Substring(0,textToWrite.Length-2);
    textToWrite += Environment.NewLine;
}
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1  
Most likely because you create huge strings with each textToWrite += whatever. In Java one can use StringBuilder to create big strings efficiently, try to find an equivalent in C#. –  Njol Jan 14 '14 at 9:56
    
Thanks All! Certainly seemed to do the trick. I will mark the answer as the one whose code I used to help me fix the problem. I had used StringBuilders before, but not for a long time and I never knew why. Now I do!!! –  Anthony Wood Jan 14 '14 at 10:12

8 Answers 8

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Because you are creating tons of strings.

You should use StringBuilder for this.

StringBuilder sb = new StringBuildeR();

for (int i = 0; i < m.rows; i++)
{
    bool first = true;

    for (int j = 0; j < m.cols; j++)
    {
        sb.Append(m[i, j]);

        if (first)
        {
            first = false;
        }
        else
        {
            sb.Append(",");
        }
    }

    sb.AppendLine();
}

string output = sb.ToString();
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Yes, the += operator is not very efficient. Use StringBuilder instead.

In the .NET framework a string is immutable, which means it cannot be modified in place. This means the += operator has to create a new string every time, which means allocating memory, copying the value of the existing string and writing it to the new location. It's ok for one or two concatenations, but as soon as you put it in a loop you need to use an alternative.

http://support.microsoft.com/kb/306822

You'll see a massive performance improvement by using the following code:

var textToWriteBuilder = new StringBuilder();

for (int i = 0; i < m.rows; i++)
{
    for (int j = 0; j < m.cols; j++)
    {
        textToWriteBuilder.Append(m[i, j].ToString() + ",");
    }

    // I've modified the logic on the following line, I assume you want to 
    // concatenate the value instead of overwriting it as you do in your question.
    textToWriteBuilder.Append(textToWriteBuilder.Substring(0, textToWriteBuilder.Length - 2));
    textToWriteBuilder.Append(Environment.NewLine);
}

string textToWrite = textToWriteBuilder.ToString();
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Please explain why it is not efficient, and how he could allocate a buffer if he can compute the final size of the buffer ? –  BlueTrin Jan 14 '14 at 9:56
    
If concatenation was less efficient, the C# compiler would just always use StringBuilder. Sometimes concatenation is less efficient. Constant-factor overheads are not the issue. The issue is quadratic running time. –  usr Jan 14 '14 at 9:57
1  
@BlueTrin class string is immutable, so each time new object is created in memory. thats the reason to use stringbuilder –  Nitin Varpe Jan 14 '14 at 9:58
    
@NitinVarpe: I know the answer, I want him to edit his answer. –  BlueTrin Jan 14 '14 at 10:39
1  
I already have :) –  greg84 Jan 14 '14 at 10:50

Your code is taking so long because you're appending strings, creating thousands of new temporary strings as you go. The memory manager needs to find memory for these strings (which increase in memory requirements, as they get longer) and the operation copies the characters you have so far (the number of which increases with every iteration) to the newest string.

The alternative is to use a single StringBuilder, on which you call Append() to append more efficiently and, finally, ToString() when you're done to get the finalized string that you want to use.

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1  
The temporaries are not the issue. The issue is quadratic running time. –  usr Jan 14 '14 at 9:57

The biggest issue I see with this is the fact you're using textToWrite as a string.

As strings are immutable so each time the string is changed new memory must be reserved copied from the previous version.

A far more efficient approach is to use the StringBuilder class which is designed for exactly this type of scenario. For example:

StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
for (int i = 0; i < m.rows; i++)
{
    for (int j = 0; j < m.cols; j++)
    {
        sb.Append(m[i, j].ToString());
        if(j < m.cols - 1) // don't add a comma on the last element
        {
          sb.Append(",");
        }
    }
    sb.AppendLine();
}
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Your code is actually better - you used correct implementation of the remove last comma –  Anthony Wood Jan 14 '14 at 10:15

Supposing that textToWrite is a String, you should use StringBuilder instead. String is immutable and it is very ineffective to add small parts.

Ideally you would initialize StringBuilder with a reasonable size (see doc).

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Use a StringBuilder instead of several million concatenations.

If you concatenate 2 strings, this means the system allocates new memory to contain both of them, and then copies both in. A zillion large memory allocations and copy actions become slow very fast.

What StringBuilder does is reduce this immensely by allocating 'in advance', thus only having to grow the buffer a few times and just copying it in, eliminating the by far slowest factor of your loop.

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Assume the matrix is of size MxM and has N elements. You are building the string in a way that takes O(N^2) (or O(M^4)) in the number of iterations. Each operation must copy what's already there. The issue is not some constant-factor overhead like temporary strings.

Use StringBuilder.

String concatenation is more efficient for small number of concatenated strings. For a dynamic number of strings, use StringBuilder.

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Is there a way to avoid that an algorithm which enumerates all matrix elements is O(n^2)? –  Dirk Jan 14 '14 at 9:58
1  
In my example, N is the number of concatenations. If you make M the matrix dimension, this algorithm is O(M^4). –  usr Jan 14 '14 at 9:59
    
Thanks. I thought of n as the number of rows/columns. –  Dirk Jan 14 '14 at 10:01

The reason that it takes so long to run is because you are using string concatenation to create a string. For each iteration it will copy the entire string to a new string, so in the end you will have copied strings that adds up to several million times the final string.

Use a StringBuilder to create the string:

StringBuilder textToWrite = new StringBuilder();
for (int i = 0; i < m.rows; i++)
{
    for (int j = 0; j < m.cols; j++)
    {
        if (j > 0) textToWrite.Append(',');
        textToWrite.Append(m[i, j]);
    }
    textToWrite.AppendLine();
}
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