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Good day, I have a data set on which I want to perform a specific auto correlation function:

i = \frac{1}{N} \sum\limits_{i=1}^n{S(j)S(j+1)}

However, I really don't know how to implement this.

The data I have is an array with 1 row and 400 columns. So I just want to write a script that does exactly the above, starting at i = 0 it should multiply element 1 with element 1, element 2 with element 2, etc all the way up to 400. Then, it should multiply element 1 with element 2, 2 with three, and so on.

I also want to normalize it such that the first point is equal to 1.

Now I see an issue with this, namely that this is supposed to be done for n = infinity. This means that rather quickly, the j+ith element will not exist, if j+i > 400. That I don't know how to handle.

I understand that I should attempt to come up with a script myself, instead of just asking you what to do. However, I'm afraid that I've only started using MatLab approximately last week, and I'm still very inexperienced.

What I have thought of so far is, for the normalization, to just divide every element by the value of the first element. This way the first one is equal to 1, which is all I need, I guess. I can just do this all the way at the end.

What I have come up with so far is

for n = 0:399
correlation(n) = 0;
for m = 1:400
correlation(n) = correlation (n) + dataset(1,m)*dataset(1,m+n);
end
end

Here, I am not taking into account that the array only has 400 columns, as I don't really know how. But if in principle there were infinite columns, would this be the right idea? (other than the fact that the loop would never end, as it is infinite, but in theory)

Perhaps something like

for n = 0:399
correlation(n+1) = 0;
for m = 1:400
    if m+n < 401
correlation(n+1) = correlation (n+1) + dataset(1,m)*dataset(1,m+n);
    end
end
end
correlation = correlation ./ correlation(1,1);
plot(x,correlation, 'b')

would work? It does give me a graph that goes from 1 to approximately 0. I'm just not sure if this makes sense, and if it would be possible to do this more efficiently.

share|improve this question
    
You can typeset your equation as an image here: codecogs.com/latex/eqneditor.php and then embed the image in your question. Although apparently you can do a lot with unicode and there are <sub> and <sup> tags too: meta.stackexchange.com/questions/30559/latex-on-stack-overflow – Dan Jan 14 '14 at 10:54

The data I have is an array with 1 row and 400 columns. So I just want to write a script that does exactly the above, starting at i = 0 it should multiply element 1 with element 1, element 2 with element 2, etc all the way up to 400. Then, it should multiply element 1 with element 2, 2 with three, and so on.

If I understood this part correctly, you want to multiply every possible combination of dataset. This can be done by the Kronecker tensor product. For more details see Mathworks.

So you could formulate it the following way:

MultipliedDataSet = kron(dataset,dataset')

where dataset' is the transposed version of your original data. Hope I understood it correctly and hope it helps.

share|improve this answer
    
I should look a little closer, but I'm not entirely sure. What the Kronecker does is, say, go from -n to n, instead of just from 1 to n. So instead of seeing if a point is correlated with points later in time, it also checks for points earlier in time. But I don't know if it should. I need to think on that! – user129412 Jan 14 '14 at 10:39
    
Then again, I suppose it does not work. If I wanted, say C(0), which is S(1)*S(1) + S(2)*S(2) and so on, that would be the diagonal of the kronecker product, not the sum of one of the rows or columns. – user129412 Jan 14 '14 at 10:45
    
Yes you are right, it would not be the sum of rows/columns but assuming that the kronecker product is a solution for your problem, you could do the summation afterwards. Of course you should think about this only when you are sure that kronecker is the right way to go! – Yunus Jan 14 '14 at 10:55
    
Yes, I'm afraid that it is not, because it does not do exactly what I want it to do. I really want to implement the equation that I wrote in the first few lines, and sadly the kronecker product does not do that. Thank you though, it was good for me to think about, so that I understand better what I am trying to do! – user129412 Jan 14 '14 at 12:04

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