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I want to know is there any way to make operations on two images without analyzing them pixel by pixel. I try to make a mix view from two cameras in real time. Becouse of that, operations must be made with speed 10 frames per second at least.

First version of my program looks like this:

                        CPylonImage im1;
                CPylonImage im2;

    uint32_t width = im2.GetWidth();
        uint32_t height = im2.GetHeight();
        uint8_t* buffer1 = static_cast<uint8_t*>( im1.GetBuffer());
        uint8_t* p1 = buffer1;
        uint8_t* buffer2 = static_cast<uint8_t*>( im2.GetBuffer());
        uint8_t* p2 = buffer2;
        for (uint32_t y = 0; y < height; ++y)
        {
            for (uint32_t x = 0; x < width; ++x, ++p1)
            {
                *p2 = (uint8_t)*p1+*p2;
                ++p2;
            }
        }
        ShowImage( im2, "Mixed image");

But this was too slow.

I will be very grateful for any answer.

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closed as unclear what you're asking by EdChum, stijn, Aurelius, sashoalm, Karl Nicoll Mar 15 '14 at 22:05

Please clarify your specific problem or add additional details to highlight exactly what you need. As it's currently written, it’s hard to tell exactly what you're asking. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
Please clarify.. your title says "without a buffer" but your question mentions "not pixel by pixel".. those are not mutually exclusive? What do you really want? What do you mean with "without a buffer"? How do you expect to subtract one image from another without doing that for each pixel? –  stijn Jan 14 '14 at 10:35
2  
You could try using SSE instructions to do it on 4 bytes at a time. But the real questions is: Have you profiled to know that tha bottleneck is on this specific action? What resolution are we talking about? –  RedX Jan 14 '14 at 11:37
    
I added part of my previous code to clarify. Maybe i could add a buffer to whole image. How can I made it? The resolution of my camera is 1294 pixels x 964 pixels. –  CherryCola Jan 14 '14 at 11:46
    
Program is compiling, but it brings me an exception after few seconds of running. The exception is sth about access violation. –  CherryCola Jan 14 '14 at 11:53
    
Use hardware acceleration, such as OpenGL or DirectX. SSE can help too. But I don't get the "without the buffer" thing. –  concept3d Jan 14 '14 at 12:20

2 Answers 2

The code you shared has many problems and in the comment section you state that it doesn't even work. I think you should focus on solving one problem at a time, and when the code actually works then it makes sense to try to make it faster.

Your application retrieves the width from one image and the height from the other. This rarely leads to good things.

    uint32_t width = im1.GetWidth();
    uint32_t height = im2.GetHeight();

Alright, so buffer1 points to im1, and p1 points to buffer1. I think you don't really need p1, just use buffer1 instead.

    uint8_t* buffer1 = static_cast<uint8_t*>( im1.GetBuffer());
    uint8_t* p1 = buffer1;

And now buffer2 and p2 points to im1. What?! Shouldn't it be im2??? You don't really need p2.

    uint8_t* buffer2 = static_cast<uint8_t*>( im1.GetBuffer());
    uint8_t* p2 = buffer2;


    for (uint32_t y = 0; y < height; ++y)
    {

The next loop increments p, which is a variable that wasn't declared. I suppose you tried to increment p1.

        for (uint32_t x = 0; x < width; ++x, ++p)
        {
            *p2 = (uint8_t)*p1+*p2;
            ++p2;
        }
    }

Right now it doesn't make sense to display im2 since it wasn't modified by the code.

    ShowImage( im2, "Mixed image");

One more thing, if im1 and im2 have different sizes it could lead to a crash.

I strongly suggest you take a look at the following post to know how to ask better questions and get people to help you: Short, Self Contained, Correct (Compilable), Example

There is a few technologies that can speed up the processing of those arithmetic operations:

  • If you have an Intel CPU: Intel® Threading Building Blocks (Intel® TBB);
  • If you have an Intel CPU: Intel® Integrated Performance Primitives (Intel® IPP);
  • If you have a GPU that supports OpenGL, you can write your own GLSL shader;
  • If you have a GPU that supports DirectX, you can write your own HLSL shader;
  • If you have an NVIDIA GPU: CUDA™;
  • If you have an NVIDIA/ATI GPU: OpenCL;
  • You can try Eigen, a C++ template library for linear algebra (performs optimized operations on matrices);
  • OpenMP® (a specification for a set of compiler directives, library routines, and environment variables that can be used to specify high-level parallelism in Fortran and C/C++ programs);
  • At last but not least, you can always write your own assembly code to perform the arithmetic operations.
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I didn't add my actual code. Ijust tried to rebuild it on quickly from memory. As you can see i made some mistakes while doing it. Two images have same sizes. Anyway Thanks for your answer :) –  CherryCola Jan 14 '14 at 13:24
    
OpenCV is a framework for computer vision that presents many image processing techniques, including the operations you are interested at. To speed up the processing, OpenCV uses several of the technologies above. It's worth checking it out since it's open source and you can take a look at the source code. ;) –  karlphillip Jan 14 '14 at 14:02

Before you start optimising, make sure that your output is correct!

The expression

*p2 = (uint8_t)*p1+*p2;

will overflow and give you wrong results. The cast (uint8_t) will not magically clip your values to a valid range, but only convert your result of the addition. In this case the cast does not do anything, since the operands are uint8_t.

const uint16_t a = *p1;
const uint16_t b = *p2;
const uint16_t sum = a+b;
*p2 = static_cast<uint8_t>( sum > 255 ? 255 : sum );

Better yet, add the results and divide by two, this way you stay in a valid range, only loose the LSB and it's branchless.

*p2 = static_cast<uint8_t>( sum >> 1 );

Some more tips you could try before you have to use a different technique.

  • Use a compiler (vc>=2012,gcc>=4.7) which supports Auto-Vectorisation and turn it on.
  • If you are compiling for windows 32bit use "/arch:SSE2"
  • Give the compilers hints by using const and restrict.
  • if you are sure that the window size is always the same, use fixed width and height

e.g.

void add( const CPylonImage& im1, CPylonImage& im2 )
{
    const int w = 1294; //im1.width();
    const int h = 964; //im1.height();

    const uint8_t* restrict buffer1 = static_cast<uint8_t*>( im1.getBuffer() );
    uint8_t* restrict buffer2 = static_cast<uint8_t*>( im2.getBuffer() );
    for( int i = 0; i < w*h; i++ )
    {
        const uint16_t a = buffer1[i];
        const uint16_t b = buffer2[i];
        const uint16_t sum = a+b >> 1;
        buffer2[i] = static_cast<uint8_t>( sum );
    }
}
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