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I am trying to select specific column elements for each row of a numpy array. For example, in the following example:

In [1]: a = np.random.random((3,2))
Out[1]: 
array([[ 0.75670668,  0.1283942 ],
       [ 0.51326555,  0.59378083],
       [ 0.03219789,  0.53612603]])

I would like to select the first element of the first row, the second element of the second row, and the first element of the third row. So I tried to do the following:

In [2]: b = np.array([0,1,0])

In [3]: a[:,b]

But this produces the following output:

Out[3]: 
array([[ 0.75670668,  0.1283942 ,  0.75670668],
       [ 0.51326555,  0.59378083,  0.51326555],
       [ 0.03219789,  0.53612603,  0.03219789]])

which clearly is not what I am looking for. Is there an easy way to do what I would like to do without using loops?

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3 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

You can use:

a[np.arange(3), (0,1,0)]

in your example above.

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Indeed. Slicing preserves the given axis as is whereas what you wanted along both dimensions is called fancy indexing in the documentation. –  dwf Jan 21 '10 at 23:36
    
Right. For example, a[0:2,0:2] and a[[0,1],[0,1]] return different things. –  Steve Tjoa Jan 24 '10 at 4:31
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OK, just to clarify here, lets do a simple example

A=diag(arange(0,10,1))

gives

array([[0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0],
       [0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0],
       [0, 0, 2, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0],
       [0, 0, 0, 3, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0],
       [0, 0, 0, 0, 4, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0],
       [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 5, 0, 0, 0, 0],
       [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 6, 0, 0, 0],
       [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 7, 0, 0],
       [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 8, 0],
       [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 9]])

then

A[0][0:4]

gives

array([0, 0, 0, 0])

that is first row, elements 0 to 3. But

A[0:4][1]

doesn't give the first 4 rows, the 2nd element in each. Instead we get

array([0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0])

i.e the entire 2nd column.

A[0:4,1]

gives

array([0, 1, 0, 0])

I'm sure there is a very good reason for this and which makes perfect sense to programmers but for those of us uninitiated in that great religion it can be quite confusing.

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A[0:4] creates a new array of shape (4,10). With A[0:4,y], you're asking for the second dimension of the array, whereas for A[0:4][x], you're asking for the first dimension of the new array ! You can write it A[0:4,:][1,:] if it helps you see when are asking for dim 1 or dim 2 –  bendaizer May 24 '13 at 16:03
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This isn't an answer so much as an attempt to document this a bit. For the answer above, we would have:

>>> import numpy as np
>>> A = np.array(range(6))
>>> A
array([0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5])
>>> A.shape = (3,2)
>>> A
array([[0, 1],
       [2, 3],
       [4, 5]])
>>> A[(0,1,2),(0,1,0)]
array([0, 3, 4])

Specifying a list (or tuple) of individual row and column coordinates allows fancy indexing of the array. The first example in the comment looks similar at first, but the indices are slices. They don't extend over the whole range, and the shape of the array that is returned is different:

>>> A[0:2,0:2]
array([[0, 1],
       [2, 3]])

For the second example in the comment

>>> A[[0,1],[0,1]]
array([0, 3])

So it seems that slices are different, but except for that, regardless of how indices are constructed, you can specify a tuple or list of (x-values, y-values), and recover those specific elements from the array.

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