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Say I have the following method inside a UIViewController subclass:

- (void)makeAsyncNetworkCall
{
    [self.networkService performAsyncNetworkCallWithCompletion:^{
        dispatch_async(dispatch_get_main_queue(), ^{
                [self.activityIndicatorView stopAnimating];
            }
        });
    }];
}

I know that the reference to self inside the block results in the UIViewController instance being retained by the block. As long as performAsyncNetworkCallWithCompletion does not store the block in a property (or ivar) on my NetworkService, am I right in thinking there is no retain cycle?

I realise this structure above will lead to the UIViewController being retained until performAsyncNetworkCallWithCompletion finishes, even if it is released by the system earlier. But it likely (or even possible?) the system will deallocate my UIViewController at all (after the changes to the way iOS 6 manages a UIViewController's backing CALayer memory)?

If there is a reason I must do the "weakSelf/strongSelf dance", it would look like this:

- (void)makeAsyncNetworkCall
{
    __weak typeof(self) weakSelf = self;
    [self.networkService performAsyncNetworkCallWithCompletion:^{
        typeof(weakSelf) strongSelf = weakSelf;
        if (!strongSelf) {
            return;
        }
        dispatch_async(dispatch_get_main_queue(), ^{
                [strongSelf.activityIndicatorView stopAnimating];
            }
        });
    }];
}

But I find this unconscionably ugly and would like to avoid it if it's not necessary.

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1  
no need for strongSelf. if self has been deallocated, weakSelf will be nil, which is fine. –  Patrick Goley Jan 14 '14 at 21:33
    
Yes, correct in this example, though see the caveats at the end of the accepted answer. –  Robert Atkins Jan 15 '14 at 9:39

4 Answers 4

up vote 14 down vote accepted

As I believe you correctly diagnosed, using self will not necessarily cause strong reference cycle in this scenario. But this will retain the view controller while the network operation completes, and in this case (as in most cases), there's no need to. Thus, it may not be necessary to do use weakSelf, but probably prudent to do so. It minimizes the chance of an accidental strong reference cycle and leads to more efficient use of memory (releasing the memory associated with the view controller as soon as that view controller is dismissed rather than unnecessarily retaining the view controller until after the network operation is complete).

There is no need for the strongSelf construct, though. You can:

- (void)makeAsyncNetworkCall
{
    __weak typeof(self) weakSelf = self;
    [self.networkService performAsyncNetworkCallWithCompletion:^{
        dispatch_async(dispatch_get_main_queue(), ^{
            [weakSelf.activityIndicatorView stopAnimating];
        });
    }];
}

You only need the weakSelf/strongSelf combination where it's critical to have a strong reference (e.g., you're dereferencing ivars) or if you need to worry about race conditions. That does not appear to be the case here.

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2  
BTW, if your network operations are time consuming (either because of size or number of requests) and you don't really want them to continue executing after the view controller is dismissed, in addition to the weakSelf pattern, you might also contemplate making your network operations cancelable, and have the view controller cancel any pending requests when it's dismissed. Using operation queue with cancelable NSOperation-based requests, rather than GCD, can facilitate that process. –  Rob Jan 15 '14 at 17:44

I think the issue is that the networkService may keep a strong reference to the block. And the view controller may have a strong reference to the networkService. So the possible cycle of VC->NetworkService->block->VC could exist. However, in this case, it's usually safe to assume that the block will be released after it has run, in which case the cycle is broken. So, in this case, it isn't necessary.

Where it is necessary is if the block is not released. Say, instead of having a block that runs once after a network call, you have a block that is used as a callback. i.e. the networkService object maintains a strong reference to the block and uses it for all callbacks. In this case, the block will have a strong reference to the VC, and this will create a strong cycle, so a weak reference is preferred.

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In this particular context, I wrote the NetworkService, so I know it doesn't retain the block. I understand I can't rely upon this if I don't have visibility into that code. –  Robert Atkins Jan 14 '14 at 13:38
    
My point is that this is what you should be thinking about when considering whether you need to use a weakSelf construct. –  Abizern Jan 14 '14 at 13:39

No, If your self.networkService don't use it as a block property you should be fine

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Can you speak to the specifics of the UIViewController possibly being retained longer than necessary and whether that matters? That's the real meat of the question. Links to authoritative treatments (NSHipster, Mike Ash, objc.io, @bbum etc) especially appreciated :-). –  Robert Atkins Jan 14 '14 at 13:11
    
Why would UIViewController be retained longer than necessary? What was new in iOS 6 is that view controllers don’t unload their views automatically. It has nothing to do with retaining view controller objects themselves. –  eofster Jan 14 '14 at 13:41
2  
@AlexeiKuznetsov If the user dismisses the view controller while the network operation is still in progress, if the network operation's completion block references the view controller, self, the view controller won't get released until the network operation completes. While often not a significant problem, it could be exacerbated if you had a whole bunch of network operations backlogged or if it's a very lengthy network operation. There's no reason for network operation to maintain strong reference to view controller, so weakSelf pattern is advisable. –  Rob Jan 15 '14 at 13:38
    
In the simplest case where there is only a call to self in the callback, yes, it would be easier. But if the callback does something else in addition to referencing self, there might be side-effects because the programmer might not expect self to suddenly become nil and the controller to not exist anymore. So to avoid those cases one probably needs to check the current state of the controller anyway. What do you think? –  eofster Jan 15 '14 at 17:20
    
@AlexeiKuznetsov If the developer has employed the weakSelf pattern (which is designed explicitly to handle the view controller being deallocated), I'm not sympathetic to the "might not expect self to suddenly become nil" theory. But if the developer is doing a whole bunch of things and wants to be assured that once the completion block starts that the weakSelf won't get deallocated in some race condition, then he might employ the more cumbersome weakSelf/strongSelf pattern, checking to see if strongSelf is not nil. But, in most cases, weakSelf, alone, is sufficient. –  Rob Jan 15 '14 at 23:43

The answer is not so straightforward here. I agree with @Rob's answer, but it needs additional explanation:

  1. __weak is considered as a safe way, since it nils the self when released, meaning there will be no exception if callback happens much later when the calling object is already released, referenced by block, like UIViewController popped from the stack. Adding the possibility of cancelling any kind of operation is her merely a matter of hygiene and perhaps resources as well. You can, for example also just cancel NSURLConnection, it's not only NSOperation that can be canceled, you can cancel whatever is being executed asynchronously in the method that calls back to block.

  2. If self is let to be retained by the block, then the story can get a bit complicated if the caller object like UIViewController is being released by UINavigationController and block still retains it and calls back. In this case callback block will be executed and assumed some data will be changed by results of it. That might be even wanted behaviour, but in most of the cases not. Therefore the cancelling of operation might be more vital in this case, making it very wise in UINavigationControllerDelegate methods by cancelling asynchronous tasks from the mutable collection that reside either on UINavigationController as associated object or as a singleton.

Save bet is with first option, of course, but only in the case you don't want asynchronous operation to continue after you dismiss the caller object.

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