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I thought I understood Java generics pretty well, but then I came across the following in java.lang.Enum:

class Enum<E extends Enum<E>>

Could someone explain how to interpret this type parameter? Bonus points for providing other examples of where a similar type parameter could be used.

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Here's the explanation I like best: Groking Enum (aka Enum&lt;E extends Enum&lt;E>>) –  Alan Moore Jan 1 at 3:26
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6 Answers

up vote 65 down vote accepted

It means that the type argument for enum has to derive from an enum which itself has the same type argument. How can this happen? By making the type argument the new type itself. So if I've got an enum called StatusCode, it would be equivalent to:

public class StatusCode extends Enum<StatusCode>

Now if you check the constraints, we've got Enum<StatusCode> - so E=StatusCode. Let's check: does E extend Enum<StatusCode>? Yes! We're okay.

You may well be asking yourself what the point of this is :) Well, it means that the API for Enum can refer to itself - for instance, being able to say that Enum<E> implements Comparable<E>. The base class is able to do the comparisons (in the case of enums) but it can make sure that it only compares the right kind of enums with each other. (EDIT: Well, nearly - see the edit at the bottom.)

I've used something similar in my C# port of ProtocolBuffers. There are "messages" (immutable) and "builders" (mutable, used to build a message) - and they come as pairs of types. The interfaces involved are:

  public interface IBuilder<TMessage, TBuilder>
    where TMessage : IMessage<TMessage, TBuilder> 
    where TBuilder : IBuilder<TMessage, TBuilder>

  public interface IMessage<TMessage, TBuilder>
    where TMessage : IMessage<TMessage, TBuilder> 
    where TBuilder : IBuilder<TMessage, TBuilder>

This means that from a message you can get an appropriate builder (e.g. to take a copy of a message and change some bits) and from a builder you can get an appropriate message when you've finished building it. It's a good job users of the API don't need to actually care about this though - it's horrendously complicated, and took several iterations to get to where it is.

EDIT: Note that this doesn't stop you from creating odd types which use a type argument which itself is okay, but which isn't the same type. The purpose is to give benefits in the right case rather than protect you from the wrong case.

So if Enum weren't handled "specially" in Java anyway, you could (as noted in comments) create the following types:

public class First extends Enum<First> {}
public class Second extends Enum<First> {}

Second would implement Comparable<First> rather than Comparable<Second>... but First itself would be fine.

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very enlightening! thanks! –  Chii Oct 17 '08 at 10:24
    
I am really interested in the usefulness of this kind of thing versus the complexity. When I C#'ify your english description I get this: <pre> interface IBuilder<TMessage> { IMessage<TMessage> GetMessage(); } interface IMessage<TMessage> { IBuilder<TMessage> GetBuilder(); } </pre> –  artsrc Mar 22 '12 at 2:12
    
@artsrc: I can't remember offhand why it needs to be generic in both the builder and the message. I'm pretty sure I wouldn't have gone down that route if I hadn't needed it though :) –  Jon Skeet Mar 22 '12 at 6:45
1  
@SayemAhmed: Yes, it doesn't prevent that aspect of mixing up the types. I'll add a note about this. –  Jon Skeet Jul 18 '13 at 9:55
1  
@JonSkeet: That's what I thought, but couldn't verify it from anywhere else! Thank you for your answer, I would have +1d you again if that was possible. –  Sayem Ahmed Jul 18 '13 at 10:07
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Here's the explanation I like best: Groking Enum (aka Enum<E extends Enum<E>>)

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2  
This was helpful. I thought this line, especially, got to the heart of things: "To say that another way: this idiom allows a superclass (such as an Abstract Factory) to define methods whose argument types and return types are in terms of the subclass type, not the superclass type." –  Jonah Mar 22 '12 at 23:21
    
@Jonah: No it doesn't. For example, the example they gave above that line is fully consistent with abstract class Foo<SubClassOfFoo> –  newacct Nov 30 '13 at 8:14
    
@newacct thats how it should be read. Foo is a generic class. So the subclass isn't known at that point in time. (sub class of foo is written as ) <? extends foo> but that means its defined in terms of all sub classes. So if baz extended foo also that means the method is in terms of bar and baz. Therfore the only generic signature which seperates the children is foo<T extends foo<T>. bar would implement Foo<Bar> and Baz would implement Foo<Baz> I.e. they refer to themselves. –  Wes Dec 13 '13 at 11:27
    
@Wes: You are not getting what I'm saying. It would work just fine with abstract class Foo<T> (the SubClassOfFoo was simply the type parameter name borrowed from the example) –  newacct Dec 13 '13 at 23:00
    
URLs should be included in an answer for further reading only. This answer appears to rely heavily on the content of a URL and would benefit from a summary of the URL being included in the answer. –  Duncan Dec 28 '13 at 9:08
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The following is a modified version of the explanation from the book Java Generics and Collections: We have an Enum declared

enum Season { WINTER, SPRING, SUMMER, FALL }

which will be expanded to a class

final class Season extends ...

where ... is to be the somehow-parameterised base class for Enums. Let's work out what that has to be. Well, one of the requirements for Season is that it should implement Comparable<Season>. So we're going to need

Season extends ... implements Comparable<Season>

What could you use for ... that would allow this to work? Given that it has to be a parameterisation of Enum, the only choice is Enum<Season>, so that you can have:

Season extends Enum<Season>
Enum<Season> implements Comparable<Season>

So Enum is parameterised on types like Season. Abstract from Season and you get that the parameter of Enum is any type that satisfies

 E extends Enum<E>

Maurice Naftalin (co-author, Java Generics and Collections)

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Sure I agree that Season extends Enum<Season>. But that doesn't explain why Enum has a bound on its type parameter, instead of just class Enum<E> –  newacct Nov 30 '13 at 8:07
    
@newacct Because there's nothing special about Season--the argument above applies to any type that Enum can be parameterised on. So Weekday (or whatever) must extend Enum<Weekday>, etc, and in general any E must extend Enum<E>. And that's exactly what the declaration says. –  Maurice Naftalin Dec 12 '13 at 9:39
    
You still didn't get what I said. Just because the declaration is satisfied doesn't explain why it is necessary. –  newacct Dec 12 '13 at 19:31
    
@newacct OK, I get it now: you'd like all enums to be instances of Enum<E>, right? (Because if they are instances of an Enum subtype, the argument above applies.) But then you won't have type-safe enums any more, so losing the point of having enums at all. –  Maurice Naftalin Dec 15 '13 at 0:17
    
I don't understand what you mean by "to be instances of Enum<E>". I would like Season to extend Enum<Season> and Weekday to extend Enum<Weekday. But I am saying there is no reason given here, about why the class Enum shouldn't be declared as just abstract class Enum<E>. It would still be 100% as type-safe as before. –  newacct Dec 16 '13 at 9:16
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This post has totally clarified to me these problem of 'recursive generic types'. I just wanted to add another case where this particular structure is necessary.

Suppose you have generic nodes in a generic graph:

public abstract class Node<T extends Node<T>>
{
    public void addNeighbor(T);

    public void addNeighbors(Collection<? extends T> nodes);

    public Collection<T> getNeighbor();
}

Then you can have graphs of specialized types:

public class City extends Node<City>
{
    public void addNeighbor(City){...}

    public void addNeighbors(Collection<? extends City> nodes){...}

    public Collection<City> getNeighbor(){...}
}
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It still allows me to create a class Foo extends Node<City> where Foo is unrelated to City. –  newacct Nov 23 '11 at 22:43
1  
Sure, and is that wrong? I don't think so. The base contract provided by Node<City> is still honoured, only your Foo subclass less useful since you start working with Foos but get Cities out of the ADT. There may be a use case for this, but most likely simpler and more useful to just make the generic parameter the same as the subclass. But either way, the designer has that choice. –  mdma Apr 24 '12 at 11:30
    
@mdma: I agree. So then what use does the bound provide, over just class Node<T>? –  newacct Nov 30 '13 at 8:09
    
@nozebacle: Your example does not demonstrate that "this particular structure is necessary". class Node<T> is fully consistent with your example. –  newacct Nov 30 '13 at 8:10
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You are not the only one wondering what that means; see Chaotic Java blog.

“If a class extends this class, it should pass a parameter E. The parameter E’s bounds are for a class which extends this class with the same parameter E”.

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This can be illustrated by a simple example and a technique which can be used to implement chained method calls for sub-classes. In an example below setName returns a Node so chaining won't work for the City:

class Node {
    String name;

    Node setName(String name) {
        this.name = name;
        return this;
    }
}

class City extends Node {
    int square;

    City setSquare(int square) {
        this.square = square;
        return this;
    }
}

public static void main(String[] args) {
    City city = new City()
        .setName("LA")
        .setSquare(100);    // won't compile, setName() returns Node
}

So we could reference a sub-class in a generic declaration, so that the City now returns the correct type:

abstract class Node<SELF extends Node<SELF>>{
    String name;

    SELF setName(String name) {
        this.name = name;
        return self();
    }

    protected abstract SELF self();
}

class City extends Node<City> {
    int square;

    City setSquare(int square) {
        this.square = square;
        return self();
    }

    @Override
    protected City self() {
        return this;
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
       City city = new City()
            .setName("LA")
            .setSquare(100);                 // ok!
    }
}
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Your solution has an unchecked cast: return (CHILD) this; Consider adding a getThis() method: protected CHILD getThis() { return this; } See: angelikalanger.com/GenericsFAQ/FAQSections/… –  Roland Nov 28 '13 at 17:36
    
@Roland thanks for a link, I've borrowed an idea from it. Could you explain me or direct to an article explaining why is this a bad practice in this particular case? The method in the link requires more typing and this is the main argument why I am avoiding this. I've never seen cast errors in this case + I know that there are some inevitable cast errors - i.e. when one stores objects of multiple types to a same collection. So if unchecked casts are not critical and the design in somewhat complex (Node<T> is not the case), I'm ignoring them to save time. –  Andrey Chaschev Nov 28 '13 at 22:46
    
Your edit isnt that different from before besides adding some syntactic sugar, consider that the following code will actually compile but throw a run time error: ` Node<City> node = new Node<City>() .setName("node") .setSquare(1);` If you look at java byte code you will see that due to type erasure the statement return (SELF) this; is compiled into return this;, so you could just leave it out. –  Roland Nov 29 '13 at 14:39
    
@Roland thanks, this is what I needed - will update the example when I'm free. –  Andrey Chaschev Nov 29 '13 at 15:00
    
The following link is also good: angelikalanger.com/GenericsFAQ/FAQSections/… –  Roland Nov 29 '13 at 15:57
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