Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have no idea how to tackle this problem, the only thing I can think of is a brute force loop, but I'm not even sure how to loop through the rows of a data.table in a sensible way.

I have a double keyed data.table and a correlation matrix based on the first of those keys. I need to build the full correlation matrix for all elements, by looking up the correlation for any given pair, which is zero if the second key doesn't match.

Simplified Example:

library(data.table)
DT = data.table(Key1 = c("A", "A", "A", "B", "B", "C", "C"), Key2 = c(1,2,3,2,3,3,4), OtherData = "Irrelevant")
setkey(DT, Key2, Key1)
M = matrix(c(1.0, 0.4, 0.3, 
             0.4, 1.0, 0.2, 
             0.3, 0.2, 1.0), nrow = 3)

So our starting data.table looks like:

> DT
   Key1 Key2  OtherData
1:    A    1 Irrelevant
2:    A    2 Irrelevant
3:    B    2 Irrelevant
4:    A    3 Irrelevant
5:    B    3 Irrelevant
6:    C    3 Irrelevant
7:    C    4 Irrelevant

And the pre-defined correlation matrix for the A, B & C when they share the same Key2 value, is given by M:

> M
     [,1] [,2] [,3]
[1,]  1.0  0.4  0.3
[2,]  0.4  1.0  0.2
[3,]  0.3  0.2  1.0

And I now need to make a 7x7 matrix that would look like:

> result
     [,1] [,2] [,3] [,4] [,5] [,6] [,7]
[1,]  1.0    0    0    0    0    0    0
[2,]    0  1.0  0.4    0    0    0    0
[3,]    0  0.4  1.0    0    0    0    0
[4,]    0    0    0  1.0  0.4  0.3    0
[5,]    0    0    0  0.4  1.0  0.2    0
[6,]    0    0    0  0.3  0.2  1.0    0
[7,]    0    0    0    0    0    0  1.0

Where we have created the block diagonal matrix using the parts of M that match the Key1 values available at each Key2 (Key2 is effectively time).

share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Here's one way (not sure how it scales though):

rownames(M) <- colnames(M) <- LETTERS[1:3]
ans <- DT[, list(idx1=.I, idx2=rep(.I, each=.N), 
            val=as.vector(M[Key1, Key1])), by=Key2]
dcast.data.table(ans, idx2 ~ idx1, value.var="val", fill=0L)

#    idx2 1   2   3   4   5   6 7
# 1:    1 1 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0
# 2:    2 0 1.0 0.4 0.0 0.0 0.0 0
# 3:    3 0 0.4 1.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0
# 4:    4 0 0.0 0.0 1.0 0.4 0.3 0
# 5:    5 0 0.0 0.0 0.4 1.0 0.2 0
# 6:    6 0 0.0 0.0 0.3 0.2 1.0 0
# 7:    7 0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 1

dcast.data.table is available from data.table versions >= 1.9.0. The current stable CRAN version at the time of writing is 1.9.2.

share|improve this answer

This does what you want:

1.Set up the data.

DT <- data.frame(Key1 = c("A", "A", "B", "A", "B", "C", "C"), Key2 = c(1, 2, 2, 3, 3, 3, 4))

M <- matrix(c(1, 0.4, 0.3, 0.4, 1, 0.2, 0.3, 0.2, 1), nrow = 3)

2.Subset the matrix, grouping by Key2 (this returns a list).

BD <- by(DT, DT$Key2, function(df) {N = as.numeric(df$Key1); M[N,N]})

3.Construct a block-diagonal matrix.

library(magic)

do.call(adiag, BD)
share|improve this answer
    
The question is tagged data.table. –  Roland Jan 14 '14 at 15:13
1  
@Roland Still a solution is a solution at least! I can always cast to data.frame and back again. Sure there must be a way to use the data.table vectorisation on this though, starting from here... –  Corone Jan 14 '14 at 15:30
    
@Corone, yes, but this sacrifices one of the biggest advantages of using data.table which is the use of radix sort and the data having keys. –  Ricardo Saporta Jan 14 '14 at 21:17

My data.table skills aren't that strong, but I came up with a solution that takes advantage of the indices, but only if I added the row numbers.

# DT$row<-1:nrow(DT) # No longer necessary.
# Add dimension names to matrix for convenience
rownames(M)<-colnames(M)<-c('A','B','C') 

f<-function(k1,k2) {
  # rows<-DT[.(k2)]$row 
  rows<-DT[.(k2),.I]$.I
  ret<-rep(0,nrow(DT))
  ret[rows]<-M[DT[.(k2)]$Key1,k1]
  ret
}

mapply(f,DT$Key1,DT$Key2)
#      A   A   B   A   B   C C
# [1,] 1 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0
# [2,] 0 1.0 0.4 0.0 0.0 0.0 0
# [3,] 0 0.4 1.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0
# [4,] 0 0.0 0.0 1.0 0.4 0.3 0
# [5,] 0 0.0 0.0 0.4 1.0 0.2 0
# [6,] 0 0.0 0.0 0.3 0.2 1.0 0
# [7,] 0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 1

This should be a little better in the sense that the indices will be called. More efficient solutions might take advantage of the known diagonal nature of the output matrix. I wonder if there is a way to do this without adding the row numbers? The comment below indicated one way of getting the row number, I have implemented it above.

share|improve this answer
2  
Hi, you might have a look at ?data.table and check out .I –  Ricardo Saporta Jan 14 '14 at 21:15

This is edited to use native data.table() features - hopefully it should perform better!

# make the cor matrix into an expand.grid equivalent - all combos - using CJ for cross join
cor_list<-data.table(CJ(LETTERS[1:nrow(M)],LETTERS[1:nrow(M)]))
# fill with the values for M
cor_list[,cor:=unlist(as.list(M))]
# index on combination of correlation inputs
setkey(cor_list, V1, V2)

# lookup correlation for all combos of DT v DT
DTX<-DT[,cor_list[J(Key1,DT[,Key1],DT[,Key2])],by=c("Key1","Key2")]
# index on Key2
setkey(DTX,Key2)
# Set cor=0 where Key2 doesn't match (OK, it's a bit of a hack!)
DTX[Key2!=V3,cor:=0]

# fill a matrix with the vector of correlations (it fits)
# original length of DT gives you the length of side 
matrix(DTX[,cor],nrow(DT))

     [,1] [,2] [,3] [,4] [,5] [,6] [,7]
[1,]    1  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0    0
[2,]    0  1.0  0.4  0.0  0.0  0.0    0
[3,]    0  0.4  1.0  0.0  0.0  0.0    0
[4,]    0  0.0  0.0  1.0  0.4  0.3    0
[5,]    0  0.0  0.0  0.4  1.0  0.2    0
[6,]    0  0.0  0.0  0.3  0.2  1.0    0
[7,]    0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0    1

EDITED ABOVE - DOUBLE APPLY SLOW AS PER ROLAND'S COMMENT

How about this?

#function to return letter corresponding to number
lookup_letter<-function(let){match(let,matrix(c("A","B","C")))}

then nest 2 apply calls for each dimension of the matrix

apply(DT,1,function(x){                # call row-wise
  apply(DT,1,function(y)ifelse(y[2]==x[2],M[lookup_letter(x[1]),lookup_letter(y[1])],0))   # call column-wise lookup
  })

     [,1] [,2] [,3] [,4] [,5] [,6] [,7]
[1,]    1  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0    0
[2,]    0  1.0  0.4  0.0  0.0  0.0    0
[3,]    0  0.4  1.0  0.0  0.0  0.0    0
[4,]    0  0.0  0.0  1.0  0.4  0.3    0
[5,]    0  0.0  0.0  0.4  1.0  0.2    0
[6,]    0  0.0  0.0  0.3  0.2  1.0    0
[7,]    0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0    1

Probably there are better ways to lookup your correlation number, but this gives you an idea (maybe flatten M into an indexed list)

share|improve this answer
2  
The question is tagged data.table. I assume they use it for efficiency. A double apply loop will be slow. –  Roland Jan 14 '14 at 15:15
1  
@Roland - that's a good point. I've edited the answer to use data.table instead ... a bit less intuitive, but should be faster –  Troy Jan 15 '14 at 7:05

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.