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I have made this database. It looks like it is working fine, except that I was told that my table "event" is not in third normal form. I do not see why it is not in the third normal form. I thought it is maybe because of the city and the zip code, which should be always the same, but large cities can have multiple zip codes and I do not see the point in creating another table just for the cities and their zip codes, related to the event table.

Also sorry if some of the names or attributes are named incorrectly by using some of the names reserved by the system. I had to translate the code to english, because I wrote it in my home language :). Thanks for your help.

Create table [article]
(
    [id_article] Integer Identity(1,1) NOT NULL,
    [id_author] Integer NOT NULL,
    [id_category] Integer NOT NULL,
    [title] Nvarchar(50) NOT NULL,
    [content] Text NOT NULL,
    [date] Datetime NOT NULL,
Primary Key ([id_article])
) 
go

Create table [author]
(
    [id_author] Integer Identity(1,1) NOT NULL,
    [name] Nvarchar(25) NOT NULL,
    [lastname] Nvarchar(25) NOT NULL,
    [email] Nvarchar(50) NOT NULL, UNIQUE ([email]),
    [phone] Integer NOT NULL, UNIQUE ([phone]),
    [nick] Nvarchar(20) NOT NULL, UNIQUE ([nick]),
    [passwd] Nvarchar(50) NOT NULL,
    [acc_number] Integer NOT NULL, UNIQUE ([acc_number]),
Primary Key ([id_author])
) 
go

Create table [event]
(
    [id_event] Integer Identity(1,1) NOT NULL,
    [id_author] Integer NOT NULL,
    [name] Nvarchar(50) NOT NULL,
    [date] Datetime NOT NULL, UNIQUE ([date]),
    [city] Nvarchar(50) NOT NULL,
    [street] Nvarchar(50) NOT NULL,
    [zip] Integer NOT NULL,
    [house_number] Integer NOT NULL,
    [number_registered] Integer Default 0 NOT NULL Constraint [number_registered] Check (number_registered <= 20),
Primary Key ([id_event])
) 
go

Create table [user]
(
    [id_user] Integer Identity(1,1) NOT NULL,
    [name] Nvarchar(15) NOT NULL,
    [lastname] Nvarchar(25) NOT NULL,
    [email] Nvarchar(50) NOT NULL, UNIQUE ([email]),
    [phone] Integer NOT NULL, UNIQUE ([phone]),
    [passwd] Nvarchar(50) NOT NULL,
    [nick] Nvarchar(20) NOT NULL, UNIQUE ([nick]),
Primary Key ([id_user])
) 
go

Create table [commentary]
(
    [id_commentary] Integer Identity(1,1) NOT NULL,
    [content] Text NOT NULL,
    [id_article] Integer NOT NULL,
    [id_author] Integer NULL,
    [id_user] Integer NULL,
Primary Key ([id_commentary])
) 
go

Create table [category]
(
    [id_category] Integer Identity(1,1) NOT NULL,
    [name] Nvarchar(30) NOT NULL,
Primary Key ([id_category])
) 
go

Create table [registration]
(
    [id_user] Integer NOT NULL,
    [id_event] Integer NOT NULL,
Primary Key ([id_user],[id_event])
) 
go


Alter table [commentary] add  foreign key([id_article]) references [article] ([id_article])  on update no action on delete no action 
go
Alter table [article] add  foreign key([id_author]) references [author] ([id_author])  on update no action on delete no action 
go
Alter table [event] add  foreign key([id_author]) references [author] ([id_author])  on update no action on delete no action 
go
Alter table [commentary] add  foreign key([id_author]) references [author] ([id_author])  on update no action on delete no action 
go
Alter table [registration] add  foreign key([id_event]) references [event] ([id_event])  on update no action on delete no action 
go
Alter table [commentary] add  foreign key([id_user]) references [user] ([id_user])  on update no action on delete no action 
go
Alter table [registration] add  foreign key([id_user]) references [user] ([id_user])  on update no action on delete no action 
go
Alter table [article] add  foreign key([id_category]) references [category] ([id_category])  on update no action on delete no action 
go

EDIT: Do you think it could work like this? I made another table called location with all the address infos which were previously in event table and made the id_event PFK.

Create table [event]
(
    [id_event] Integer Identity(1,1) NOT NULL,
    [id_author] Integer NOT NULL,
    [name] Nvarchar(50) NOT NULL,
    [datr] Datetime NOT NULL,
    [number_registered] Integer Default 0 NOT NULL Constraint [number_registered] Check (number_registered <= 20),
Primary Key ([id_event])
) 
go


Create table [location]
(
    [city] Char(1) NOT NULL,
    [id_event] Integer NOT NULL,
    [street] Char(1) NOT NULL,
    [house_number] Char(1) NOT NULL,
    [zip] Char(1) NOT NULL,
Primary Key ([id_event])
) 
go


Alter table [event] add  foreign key([id_auhtor]) references [author] ([id_author])  on update no action on delete no action 
go

Alter table [location] add  foreign key([id_event]) references [event] ([id_event])  on update no action on delete no action 
go
share|improve this question
    
I'd say the reviewer is correct it's not... after all you don't have a different table for postcodes, cities and streets. However... do you want to? Perfect normalisation is not always the "right" way. –  Liath Jan 14 '14 at 15:19
5  
Can two events ever happen at the same address? If so, I'd have thought that the separation ought to be all of the address columns into a separate table. However, in general, you cannot determine whether tables are/are not in third normal form just by looking at table definitions. Whether they are or not depends on the actual data. –  Damien_The_Unbeliever Jan 14 '14 at 15:19
    
@Liath: If it's not in 3NF, there must be a transitive dependency. Where is it? –  Mike Sherrill 'Cat Recall' Aug 11 '14 at 21:23

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

To answer the question.

You are correct, the database is not in 3rd normal form. As you've identified there is an opportunity to normalise out the various postcodes, cities and streets. This would result in a row for each postcode (etc.) and you would have FKs for each.

Personally, I don't do this. It obviously depends on the application but in my systems I'm more interested in getting the address of the user rather than all the users who have a particular postcode.

Depending on how you intend to use your data 3rd normal may not be the most efficient way to store your data.

share|improve this answer
1  
Okay, say that we create a postcodes table with a column for the postcode. Say, further, that we decide to be a relational purist and use a natural primary key for this table - the postcodes are unique, so we'll use that. Now, the foreign key from the event table will be... the postcode. I don't think you've achieved any form of normalization by moving postcodes out into a separate table. –  Damien_The_Unbeliever Jan 14 '14 at 15:36
    
A very good point - Personally I think all you could hope to achieve would be to use ID keys minimise the size of some indicies... but I think you'd make the data harder to query and complicated for the sake. –  Liath Jan 14 '14 at 15:38
    
I edited my post with my try to make it right. What do you think about it? Do you think it would work and fulfill the 3rd normal form? –  Arcane Jan 14 '14 at 17:47
    
Personally I think your first attempt was better - 3rd normal form is a good guide a lot of the time however not in all cases - you've not actually told us what your application is for so it's difficult to advise whether it's the best design in this case. –  Liath Jan 14 '14 at 17:59
    
It is a Content Management System where authors can write various articles and users can read them, but the authors can make the events like you can on Facebook. I want them to be able to create an event, name it and set the time and location on it. And users can then register themselves if they want to go there. However it is not something that I will practically use. I am learning how to make proper databases and this is the task I got and the event table is the only thing I was told is not quite right. –  Arcane Jan 14 '14 at 18:22

Based on your edit - close, but I'd turn it around. I'd give location a location_id column (PK), remove its event_id column, and then make event be:

Create table [event]
(
    [id_event] Integer Identity(1,1) NOT NULL,
    [id_author] Integer NOT NULL,
    id_location Integer NOT NULL, /* Or null? does every event have to have a location */
    [name] Nvarchar(50) NOT NULL,
    [datr] Datetime NOT NULL,
    [number_registered] Integer Default 0 NOT NULL Constraint [number_registered] Check (number_registered <= 20),
Primary Key ([id_event])
) 

And then reverse the foreign key as well.

That way if an address requires correction it only needs to be corrected in one row - which is after all the point of normalization - making corrections only have to be applied once.

share|improve this answer
    
So it will be like this? i.imgur.com/Uav7Mqs.png –  Arcane Jan 15 '14 at 13:28
    
@Arcane - yes, that's about what I'd expect (given the imaginary data that I'd expect to appear in tables of those names - as I said in my initial comment to your question, it's not actually possible to know whether tables are normalized without actually knowing what the data looks like and the actual intended usage) –  Damien_The_Unbeliever Jan 15 '14 at 13:30
    
Ok, how will the author add the events with INSERT script? What will he input in the id_location? I thought that if it was in the weak entity like I had, he would have to input the adress aswell, but now it does not seems like it. –  Arcane Jan 15 '14 at 13:33
    
You can introduce ids, but it has nothing to do with normalization. –  philipxy Aug 15 '14 at 23:43

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