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I have this test script:

use threads;

start();

sub start {
  my $A = threads->create(\&A);
  my $B = threads->create(\&B);
  sleep;
}

sub A {
  while (1) {
    print "A\n";
    sleep(1);
  }
}

sub B {
  while (1) {
    print "B\n";
    sleep(1);
  }
}

The output for this would be (once a second, forever):

A
B

I'm trying to do the same with an object oriented package:

package Test;
use threads;

sub new { my ($class) = @_;
  my $self = {
    A => undef,
    B => undef
  };
  bless $self, $class;
  return $self;
}

sub start { my ($self) = @_;
  $self->{A} = threads->create(\&{$self->A});
  $self->{B} = threads->create(\&{$self->B});
  sleep;
}

sub A { my ($self) = @_;
  while (1) {
    print "A\n";
    sleep(1);
  }
}

sub B { my ($self) = @_;
  while (1) {
    print "B\n";
    sleep(1);
  }
}

1;

And then:

use Test;

my $test = Test->new();

$test->start();

The output for this would be (once a second, forever):

A

It seems like the code gets stuck on the first thread. I'm having a hard time understanding the logic behind threads in Perl. How can I replicate the same behavior from the first script in an object oriented package?

share|improve this question
    
The start routine in the first example should use invoke join on each thread instead of sleeping forever. –  Sinan Ünür Jan 14 at 15:49
    
I agree. I used sleep because I had to type less =P –  calvillo Jan 14 at 16:00

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

$self->A is a method call that never returns, so \&{$self->A} also never returns, and you never get to define $self->{B}.

One way to do it would be

$self->{A} = threads->create( sub { $self->A } );
$self->{B} = threads->create( sub { $self->B } );

The expression sub { $self->A } defines an (anonymous) subroutine and passes it to the threads::create method, but does not call the subroutine, allowing the program to proceed.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you. That was the problem. I tried $self->{A} = threads->create(\&A, $self);. That seems to work too. –  calvillo Jan 14 at 16:04
1  
The problem with threads->create(\&A, $self) is that the sub A does not get "called as a method". This means that subclasses of your class Test will not be able to override the method. Use threads->create(sub { $self->A }) as per @mob's suggestion. –  tobyink Jan 14 at 19:52

Here is a more interesting test script.

You should invoke the methods on the instance of the object by closing over the instance in an anonymous subroutine.

I don't know what you wish to achieve with threads->create{\&{$self->A}};

Before create can be invoked, the invocation $self->A must return a value. But, it is designed to never return. But, then, you also have curly brackets in what is supposed to be your create invocation. So, that's confusing, to say the least.

Also, please don't try to save lines by sacrificing the readability of your code.

package Test;
use strict;
use warnings;
use threads;

sub new {
    my $class = shift;
    return bless { A => undef, B => undef } => $class;
}

sub start {
    my $self = shift;
    $self->{$_} = threads->create(sub { $self->$_ }) for qw(A B);
    $self->{$_}->join for qw(A B);
    return;
}

sub A {
    my $i = 'A';
    while (10 > time - $^T) {
        print "$i\n";
        $i++;
        sleep 1;
    }
}

sub B {
    my $i = '0';
    while (10 > time - $^T) {
        print "$i\n";
        $i++;
        sleep 1;
    }
}

package Main;

use strict;
use warnings;

my $test = Test->new;
$test->start;
share|improve this answer
    
I'm working on a robot which runs forever downloading information from 6 different processes. It already works, but I'd like to make it work as an object so I can use multiple instances of the robot if necessary. About the curly brackets, it was a typo; about the legibility... I guess that's about the way I read parameters, is that right? –  calvillo Jan 14 at 16:13
    
When you write sub start { my ($self) = @_;, it is very easy to miss the assignment to $self … at least I did. –  Sinan Ünür Jan 14 at 20:55

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