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Just i was thinking about the other ways of writing singleton class. So is this class considered as a singleton class?

      public class MyClass{
            static Myclass myclass;

            static { myclass = new MyClass();}

            private MyClass(){}

            public static MyClass getInstance()
            { 
                return myclass;
            }
       }

as the static block run only once.

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Is "singleton" not "single ton" as in single fish. –  Victor Hurdugaci Jan 21 '10 at 18:25
3  
This is equivalent to static Myclass myclass = new MyClass() –  pjp Jan 21 '10 at 18:30
    
@Victor: No, it's one word. It's not a single ton (as in, unit of weight in American English). I think the "ton" suffix, used in this way, comes to English via French, but I don't know how or why. :-) –  T.J. Crowder Jan 21 '10 at 18:35
    
@T.J. Crowder: has been fixed since my comment. Check the revision history. –  Victor Hurdugaci Jan 21 '10 at 19:30
    
better question, how many broken/buggy implementations of the singleton pattern can we collect in one thread? –  james Jan 21 '10 at 19:44
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5 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

No, it is not. You didn't declare myClass private static final, nor the getInstance() is static. The code also doesn't really compile.

Here's the Singleton idiom:

public class MyClass {
    private static final MyClass myClass = new MyClass();

    private MyClass() {}

    public static MyClass getInstance() {
        return myClass; 
    }
}

It should be private, so that nobody else can access it directly. It should be static so that there's only one of it. It should be final so that it cannot be reassigned. You also need to instantiate it directly during declaration so that you don't need to worry (that much) about threading.

If the loading is expensive and you thus rather prefer lazy loading of the Singleton, then consider the Singleton holder idiom which does initialization on demand instead of during classloading:

public class MyClass {
    private MyClass() {}

    private static class LazyHolder {
        private static final MyClass myClass = new MyClass();
    }

    public static MyClass getInstance() {
        return LazyHolder.myClass;
    }
}

You should however put big question marks whether you need a Singleton or not. Often it's not needed. Just a static variable, an enum, a factory class and/or dependency injection is often the better choice.

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sorry i will change it now. –  GuruKulki Jan 21 '10 at 18:28
4  
Also look at the Initialization on demand holder idiom en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Initialization_on_demand_holder_idiom –  pjp Jan 21 '10 at 18:28
    
Thanks, updated the answer. –  BalusC Jan 21 '10 at 18:49
    
Minor nitpick, you are still doing initialization during classloading, the changes is that it is now the classloading of the private nested class, not the public class. –  james Jan 21 '10 at 19:54
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Here's one more way to do it :

public enum Singleton{
  INSTANCE("xyz", 123);

  // Attributes
  private String str;
  private int i;

  // Constructor
  Singleton(String str, int i){
    this.str = str;
    this.i = i;
  }
}

According to Josh Bloch's Effective Java, this is the best way to implement Singleton in Java.

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1  
Agreed, this instance will be a singleton at the level of the classloader. –  gpampara Jan 22 '10 at 6:54
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Here is how I do it. It is faster, because it only requires a synchronized block when the instance is created.

public class MyClass
{
private static MyClass INSTANCE=null;

private MyClass()
  {
  }

public static MyClass getInstance()
  {
  if(INSTANCE==null)
     {
     synchronized(MyClass.class)
       {
       if(INSATCNE==null) INSTANCE=new MyClass();
       }
     }
  return INSTANCE;
  }

}
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3  
double checked locking is broken. –  james Jan 21 '10 at 19:42
    
to fix the double-checked locking idiom in J2SE 5 and higher, set your variable as volatile e.g. private static volatile MyClass INSTANCE=null; –  Buhake Sindi Jan 21 '10 at 23:15
    
many thanks ! nice to know ! –  Pierre Jan 22 '10 at 7:33
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Your class (original code, before editing):

    public class MyClass{
        Myclass myclass;

        static { myclass = new MyClass();}

        private MyClass(){}

        public MyClass getInstance()
        { 
            return myclass;
        }
   }

is not a real singleton:

  1. the field myclass is not private, can be read and changed from outside (assuming you got an instace to do it on
  2. the field myclass is not static, can not be accessed in the static constructor (compilation error)
  3. the getInstance() method is not static, so you need an instance to call it


The actual code:

    public class MyClass{
        static Myclass myclass;

        static { myclass = new MyClass();}

        private MyClass(){}

        public static MyClass getInstance()
        { 
            return myclass;
        }
   }

still has myclass not being private (nor final)... declaring it final would help to prevent it being unintentionally changed from inside the class.

    private static final Myclass myclass;
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Using your example and using the GoF's way of implementing it:

public class MyClass{
    private static Myclass instance;

    private MyClass(){
        //Private instantiation
    }

    public static synchronized MyClass getInstance()  //If you want your method thread safe...
    { 
        if (instance == null) {
            instance = new MyClass();
        }

        return instance;
    }
}

Hope this helps:

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That should be "return instance" –  phisch Jan 21 '10 at 20:32
    
Thanks...I updated it...thanks for seeing my mistake. –  Buhake Sindi Jan 21 '10 at 22:56
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