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C# lets me do the following (example from MSDN):

using (Font font3 = new Font("Arial", 10.0f),
            font4 = new Font("Arial", 10.0f))
{
    // Use font3 and font4.
}

What happens if font4 = new Font throws? From what I understand font3 will leak resources and won't be disposed of.

  • Is this true? (font4 won't be disposed of)
  • Does this mean using(... , ...) should be avoided altogether in favor of nested using?
share|improve this question
7  
It won't leak memory; in the worst case, it will still get GC'd. –  SLaks Jan 14 at 16:10
3  
I wouldn't be surprised if using(... , ...) is compiled into nested using blocks regardless, but I don't know that for sure. –  Dan J Jan 14 at 16:11
1  
That's not what I meant. Even if you don't use using at all, the GC will still eventually collect it. –  SLaks Jan 14 at 16:11
1  
@zneak: Had it compiled to a single finally block, it wouldn't have entered the block until all of the resources were constructed. –  SLaks Jan 14 at 16:16
2  
@zneak: Because in the conversion of a using to a try-finally, the initialization expression is evaluated outside the try. So it is a reasonable question. –  Ben Voigt Jan 14 at 16:16

5 Answers 5

up vote 154 down vote accepted

No.

The compiler will generate a separate finally block for each variable.

The spec (§8.13) says:

When a resource-acquisition takes the form of a local-variable-declaration, it is possible to acquire multiple resources of a given type. A using statement of the form

using (ResourceType r1 = e1, r2 = e2, ..., rN = eN) statement 

is precisely equivalent to a sequence of nested using statements:

using (ResourceType r1 = e1)
   using (ResourceType r2 = e2)
      ...
         using (ResourceType rN = eN)
            statement
share|improve this answer
4  
That's 8.13 in the C# Specification version 5.0, btw. –  Ben Voigt Jan 14 at 16:14
11  
@WeylandYutani: What are you asking? –  SLaks Jan 14 at 16:18
9  
@WeylandYutani: This is a question-and-answer site. If you have a question, start a new question please! –  Eric Lippert Jan 14 at 20:31
5  
@user1306322 why? What if I really want to know? –  Oxymoron Jan 15 at 3:51
2  
@Oxymoron then you should provide some evidence of effort prior to posting the question in form of research and guesses, or else you'll be told the same, lose attention and otherwise be at a greater loss. Just an advice based on personal experience. –  user1306322 Jan 15 at 3:55

UPDATE: I used this question as the basis for an article which can be found here; see it for additional discussion of this issue. Thanks for the good question!


Though Schabse's answer is of course correct and answers the question that was asked, there is an important variant on your question you did not ask:

What happens if font4 = new Font() throws after the unmanaged resource was allocated by the constructor but before the ctor returns and fills in font4 with the reference?

Let me make that a little bit more clear. Suppose we have:

public sealed class Foo : IDisposable
{
    private int handle = 0;
    private bool disposed = false;
    public Foo()
    {
        Blah1();
        int x = AllocateResource();
        Blah2();
        this.handle = x;
        Blah3();
    }
    ~Foo()
    {
        Dispose(false);
    }
    public void Dispose() 
    { 
        Dispose(true); 
        GC.SuppressFinalize(this);
    }
    private void Dispose(bool disposing)
    {
        if (!this.disposed)
        {
            if (this.handle != 0) 
                DeallocateResource(this.handle);
            this.handle = 0;
            this.disposed = true;
        }
    }
}

Now we have

using(Foo foo = new Foo())
    Whatever(foo);

This is the same as

{
    Foo foo = new Foo();
    try
    {
        Whatever(foo);
    }
    finally
    {
        IDisposable d = foo as IDisposable;
        if (d != null) 
            d.Dispose();
    }
}

OK. Suppose Whatever throws. Then the finally block runs and the resource is deallocated. No problem.

Suppose Blah1() throws. Then the throw happens before the resource is allocated. The object has been allocated but the ctor never returns, so foo is never filled in. We never entered the try so we never enter the finally either. The object reference has been orphaned. Eventually the GC will discover that and put it on the finalizer queue. handle is still zero, so the finalizer does nothing. Notice that the finalizer is required to be robust in the face of an object that is being finalized whose constructor never completed. You are required to write finalizers that are this strong. This is yet another reason why you should leave writing finalizers to experts and not try to do it yourself.

Suppose Blah3() throws. The throw happens after the resource is allocated. But again, foo is never filled in, we never enter the finally, and the object is cleaned up by the finalizer thread. This time the handle is non-zero, and the finalizer cleans it up. Again, the finalizer is running on an object whose constructor never succeeded, but the finalizer runs anyways. Obviously it must because this time, it had work to do.

Now suppose Blah2() throws. The throw happens after the resource is allocated but before handle is filled in! Again, the finalizer will run but now handle is still zero and we leak the handle!

You need to write extremely clever code in order to prevent this leak from happening. Now, in the case of your Font resource, who the heck cares? We leak a font handle, big deal. But if you absolutely positively require that every unmanaged resource be cleaned up no matter what the timing of exceptions is then you have a very difficult problem on your hands.

The CLR has to solve this problem with locks. Since C# 4, locks that use the lock statement have been implemented like this:

bool lockEntered = false;
object lockObject = whatever;
try
{
    Monitor.Enter(lockObject, ref lockEntered);
    lock body here
}
finally
{
    if (lockEntered) Monitor.Exit(lockObject);
}

Enter has been very carefully written so that no matter what exceptions are thrown, lockEntered is set to true if and only if the lock was actually taken. If you have similar requirements then what you need to to is actually write:

    public Foo()
    {
        Blah1();
        AllocateResource(ref handle);
        Blah2();
        Blah3();
    }

and write AllocateResource cleverly like Monitor.Enter so that no matter what happens inside AllocateResource, the handle is filled in if and only if it needs to be deallocated.

Describing the techniques for doing so is beyond the scope of this answer. Consult an expert if you have this requirement.

share|improve this answer
6  
@gnat: The accepted answer. That S has to stand for something. :-) –  Eric Lippert Jan 14 at 21:19
10  
@Joe: Of course the example is contrived. I just contrived it. The risks are not exaggerated because I haven't stated what the level of risk is; rather, I've stated that this pattern is possible. The fact that you believe that setting the field directly solves the problem indicates precisely my point: that like the vast majority of programmers who have no experience with this kind of problem, you're not competent to solve this problem; indeed, most people don't even recognize that there is a problem, which is why I wrote this answer in the first place. –  Eric Lippert Jan 15 at 14:15
5  
@Chris: Suppose there is zero work done between the allocation and the return, and between the return and the assignment. We delete all those Blah method calls. What stops a ThreadAbortException from happening at either of those points? –  Eric Lippert Jan 15 at 14:16
5  
@Joe: This isn't a debating society; I'm not looking to score points by being more convincing. If you're skeptical and don't want to take my word for it that this is a tricky problem that requires consultation with experts to solve correctly then you are welcome to disagree with me. –  Eric Lippert Jan 15 at 14:31
7  
@GilesRoberts: How does that solve the problem? Suppose the exception happens after the call to AllocateResource but before the assignment to x. A ThreadAbortException can happen at that point. Everyone here seems to be missing my point, which is creation of a resource and assignment of a reference to it to a variable is not an atomic operation. In order to solve the problem I've identified you must make it an atomic operation. –  Eric Lippert Jan 17 at 15:49

As a complement to @SLaks answer, here's the IL for your code:

.method private hidebysig static 
    void Main (
        string[] args
    ) cil managed 
{
    // Method begins at RVA 0x2050
    // Code size 74 (0x4a)
    .maxstack 2
    .entrypoint
    .locals init (
        [0] class [System.Drawing]System.Drawing.Font font3,
        [1] class [System.Drawing]System.Drawing.Font font4,
        [2] bool CS$4$0000
    )

    IL_0000: nop
    IL_0001: ldstr "Arial"
    IL_0006: ldc.r4 10
    IL_000b: newobj instance void [System.Drawing]System.Drawing.Font::.ctor(string, float32)
    IL_0010: stloc.0
    .try
    {
        IL_0011: ldstr "Arial"
        IL_0016: ldc.r4 10
        IL_001b: newobj instance void [System.Drawing]System.Drawing.Font::.ctor(string, float32)
        IL_0020: stloc.1
        .try
        {
            IL_0021: nop
            IL_0022: nop
            IL_0023: leave.s IL_0035
        } // end .try
        finally
        {
            IL_0025: ldloc.1
            IL_0026: ldnull
            IL_0027: ceq
            IL_0029: stloc.2
            IL_002a: ldloc.2
            IL_002b: brtrue.s IL_0034

            IL_002d: ldloc.1
            IL_002e: callvirt instance void [mscorlib]System.IDisposable::Dispose()
            IL_0033: nop

            IL_0034: endfinally
        } // end handler

        IL_0035: nop
        IL_0036: leave.s IL_0048
    } // end .try
    finally
    {
        IL_0038: ldloc.0
        IL_0039: ldnull
        IL_003a: ceq
        IL_003c: stloc.2
        IL_003d: ldloc.2
        IL_003e: brtrue.s IL_0047

        IL_0040: ldloc.0
        IL_0041: callvirt instance void [mscorlib]System.IDisposable::Dispose()
        IL_0046: nop

        IL_0047: endfinally
    } // end handler

    IL_0048: nop
    IL_0049: ret
} // end of method Program::Main

Note the nested try/finally blocks.

share|improve this answer

This code (based on the original sample):

using System.Drawing;

public class Class1
{
    public Class1()
    {
        using (Font font3 = new Font("Arial", 10.0f),
                    font4 = new Font("Arial", 10.0f))
        {
            // Use font3 and font4.
        }
    }
}

It produces the following CIL (in Visual Studio 2013, targeting .NET 4.5.1):

.method public hidebysig specialname rtspecialname
        instance void  .ctor() cil managed
{
    // Code size       82 (0x52)
    .maxstack  2
    .locals init ([0] class [System.Drawing]System.Drawing.Font font3,
                  [1] class [System.Drawing]System.Drawing.Font font4,
                  [2] bool CS$4$0000)
    IL_0000:  ldarg.0
    IL_0001:  call       instance void [mscorlib]System.Object::.ctor()
    IL_0006:  nop
    IL_0007:  nop
    IL_0008:  ldstr      "Arial"
    IL_000d:  ldc.r4     10.
    IL_0012:  newobj     instance void [System.Drawing]System.Drawing.Font::.ctor(string,
                                                                                  float32)
    IL_0017:  stloc.0
    .try
    {
        IL_0018:  ldstr      "Arial"
        IL_001d:  ldc.r4     10.
        IL_0022:  newobj     instance void [System.Drawing]System.Drawing.Font::.ctor(string,
                                                                                      float32)
        IL_0027:  stloc.1
        .try
        {
            IL_0028:  nop
            IL_0029:  nop
            IL_002a:  leave.s    IL_003c
        }  // end .try
        finally
        {
            IL_002c:  ldloc.1
            IL_002d:  ldnull
            IL_002e:  ceq
            IL_0030:  stloc.2
            IL_0031:  ldloc.2
            IL_0032:  brtrue.s   IL_003b
            IL_0034:  ldloc.1
            IL_0035:  callvirt   instance void [mscorlib]System.IDisposable::Dispose()
            IL_003a:  nop
            IL_003b:  endfinally
        }  // end handler
        IL_003c:  nop
        IL_003d:  leave.s    IL_004f
    }  // end .try
    finally
    {
        IL_003f:  ldloc.0
        IL_0040:  ldnull
        IL_0041:  ceq
        IL_0043:  stloc.2
        IL_0044:  ldloc.2
        IL_0045:  brtrue.s   IL_004e
        IL_0047:  ldloc.0
        IL_0048:  callvirt   instance void [mscorlib]System.IDisposable::Dispose()
        IL_004d:  nop
        IL_004e:  endfinally
    }  // end handler
    IL_004f:  nop
    IL_0050:  nop
    IL_0051:  ret
} // end of method Class1::.ctor

As you can see, the try {} block doesn't start until after the first allocation, which takes place at IL_0012. At first glance, this does appear to allocate the first item in unprotected code. However, notice that the result is stored in location 0. If the second allocation then fails, the outer finally {} block executes, and this fetches the object from location 0, i.e. the first allocation of font3, and calls its Dispose() method.

Interestingly, decompiling this assembly with dotPeek produces the following reconstituted source:

using System.Drawing;

public class Class1
{
    public Class1()
    {
        using (new Font("Arial", 10f))
        {
            using (new Font("Arial", 10f))
                ;
        }
    }
}

The decompiled code confirms that everything is correct and that the using is essentially expanded into nested usings. The CIL code is a bit confusing to look at, and I had to stare at it for a good few minutes before I properly understood what was happening, so I'm not surprised that some 'old wives tales' have started to sprout up about this. However, the generated code is the unassailable truth.

share|improve this answer
    
@Peter Mortensen your edit removed chunks of the IL code (between IL_0012 and IL_0017) rendering the explanation both invalid and confusing. That code was intended to be a verbatim copy of the results I obtained and editing invalidates that. Can you please review your edit and confirm this is what you intended? –  Tim Long Jul 27 at 23:15

Here is a sample code to prove @SLaks answer:

void Main()
{
    try
    {
        using (TestUsing t1 = new TestUsing("t1"), t2 = new TestUsing("t2"))
        {
        }
    }
    catch(Exception ex)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("catch");
    }
    finally
    {
        Console.WriteLine("done");
    }

    /* outputs

        Construct: t1
        Construct: t2
        Dispose: t1
        catch
        done

    */
}

public class TestUsing : IDisposable
{
    public string Name {get; set;}

    public TestUsing(string name)
    {
        Name = name;

        Console.WriteLine("Construct: " + Name);

        if (Name == "t2") throw new Exception();
    }

    public void Dispose()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Dispose: " + Name);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
1  
That does not prove it. Where is Dispose: t2? :) –  Peri Jan 15 at 7:52
1  
The question is about the dispose of the first resource on the using list not the second. "What happens if font4 = new Font throws? From what I understand font3 will leak resources and won't be disposed of." –  wdosanjos Jan 15 at 13:06

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