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I'm on Windows :-/ and in my script i've:

$ENV{'Powmig Path'}powermt

That give me:

C:\Program\ Files\EMC\PowerPath\powermt

if I do a if(-e $ENV{'Powmig Path'}powermt) it doesn't work.

I have try to change my path with some substitution \ /

I have also try to add more double quote but nothing seems to work :-(

Exemple:

#!/usr/bin/perl
use strict;
use warnings;
use File::Spec;

if($^O =~ m/^MSWin32$/){
    my $tmp = File::Spec->catdir($ENV{'Powmig Path'}, "powermt");
    if(-e "\"$tmp\""){
        print "powermt found\n";
    }else{
        print "No multipathing found \"$tmp\"\n";
    }
    $tmp =~ s/\\/\//g;
    if(-e "\"$tmp\""){
        print "powermt found\n";
    }else{
        print "No multipathing found \"$tmp\"\n";
    }
}else{
    print "Error: Unknow OS\n";
}
exit;

Output:

C:\Users\sgargasson\Desktop>perl test.pl
No multipathing found "C:\Program Files\EMC\PowerPath\powermt"
No multipathing found "C:/Program Files/EMC/PowerPath/powermt"

After some try with different files, the problem comming from the space...

Can somebody help me?

Thx in Adv

share|improve this question
1  
Perhaps you should include the actual code that you have used. I have no problem doing file tests -e on paths with space in them in windows. It is more than likely that your problem is simply that you have done something wrong with your code. –  TLP Jan 14 '14 at 16:44
2  
And also, never, ever, ever include approximate code. Always, always include code you have used yourself, that describes your exact problem. –  TLP Jan 14 '14 at 16:45
    
re: Edit: You still have not done the -e file test on the string before you changed it. Two parts: 1) you are using the -x file test. 2) you are doing the file test after changing the string. –  TLP Jan 14 '14 at 17:13
    
I've try directly then with lot of changes with the -e and -x tests. No difference :-( –  Sylvain Gargasson Jan 14 '14 at 17:17

3 Answers 3

You do realize that you cannot just type a string into the source code, right? You need to quote it:

print "$ENV{'Powmig Path'}powermt";
...
if (-e "$ENV{'Powmig Path'}powermt") 

This will interpolate the variable, in this case a hash value from the hash %ENV, and concatenate it with the string powermt.

And if you do try to concatenate a string to a variable, you first need to quote it, and then use an operator to attach it to the variable:

my $string = $ENV{'Powmig Path'} . "powermt";
#                                ^--- concatenation operator

If you are trying to build paths, though, you might use a module suitable for that task, such as File::Spec:

use strict;
use warnings;
use File::Spec;

my $path = File::Spec->catdir($ENV{'Powmig Path'}, "powermt");
share|improve this answer
    
I've try with concat and File::Spec, not better :-( –  Sylvain Gargasson Jan 14 '14 at 17:19
    
Do this. use Data::Dumper; $Data::Dumper::Useqq = 1; print Dumper $path; system("dir", $path); see if you have any hidden whitespace characters wrong, and see if your shell can find the file with dir. –  TLP Jan 14 '14 at 17:26
    
I do my $path=$ENV{'Powmig Path'}; OUTPUT: $VAR1 = "C:\\Program Files\\EMC\\PowerPath\\"; After it display the dir –  Sylvain Gargasson Jan 14 '14 at 17:31
    
So your shell did not find that directory. And if you type directly in your shell dir "%Powmig Path%"? –  TLP Jan 14 '14 at 17:34
1  
Try reload the page. –  TLP Jan 14 '14 at 17:49

Thanks a LOT to TLP

I'm so a stupid linux user!!!!

PROBLEM:

my $tmp="$ENV{'Powmig Path'}powermt";

SOLVE:

my $tmp="$ENV{'Powmig Path'}powermt.exe";

CORRECT CODE IS:

#!/usr/bin/perl
use strict;
use warnings;

if($^O =~ m/^MSWin32$/){
    if(-e "$ENV{'Powmig Path'}powermt.exe"){
        print "powermt found\n";
    }else{
        print "No multipathing found\n";
    }
}else{
    print "Error: Unknow OS\n";
}
exit;

I'm so stupid, I need to uncheck "Hide know extension" So many hours in this things...

share|improve this answer

Here's a problem:

if(-e "\"$tmp\""){

You've got an extra set of quotes. The filename isn't "C:\Program Files\whatever", it's C:\Program Files\whatever. You only want those extra quotes if the filename is being interpreted by the Command Prompt, or something like that, and that's not the case here.

Try this instead, where I've removed the extraneous quotes ("\"$tmp\"" becomes "$tmp", which is exactly the same as $tmp):

if ( -e $tmp ) {
share|improve this answer
    
It was just a try. You can lol with my answer :-/ –  Sylvain Gargasson Jan 14 '14 at 17:59

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