Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm new to programming in c++ and struggle with organizing my project. I have got a class named StateManager, which has a header file and an cpp file. The cpp contains all implementations.

If I now want to make an Interface class:

class IStateManager
{
    public:
        virtual ~IStateManager() {}   
        virtual void SomeMethod {}
};

I know interfaces don't really exist as they do in c# or Java, but I want multiple classes to inherit from this "interface".

Does this class also need an header and a cpp file? Or can I just put it in a header file?

share|improve this question
1  
Interface should only need header since it has no implementation. It could go in a header by itself, or in another larger header file. (no restrictions like Java here) –  user645280 Jan 14 '14 at 16:41
1  
@ebyrob: These methods are not declared to be pure virtuals. –  John Dibling Jan 14 '14 at 16:42
    
C++ compiler doesn't compile header files. Compilation units are always CPP files. If your header (because it's an interface) will be included somewhere by a cpp then you don't need an empty cpp for it. That said, if yuo're talking about interfaces...I would make that methods pure (instead of empty implementation). –  Adriano Repetti Jan 14 '14 at 16:42
    
@Adriano, the empty implementation for the destructor is OK but I agree with you on the methods. –  Mark Ransom Jan 14 '14 at 16:44
    
@MarkRansom I didn't even pay attention it's destructor! :| –  Adriano Repetti Jan 14 '14 at 16:46

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Technically, c++ doesn't have interfaces. However, one can "create" interfaces by way of multiple inheritance (or single inheritance if your class is a "base" class and doesn't need to inherit from multiple classes). Where your "interface" lives is entirely up to you. But if you plan on using a class as an interface (without any actual implementation because technically an interface doesn't have an implementation until the functions are defined in a subclass), I would put it in it's own header file and declare each function pure virtual:

class IStateManager
{
    public:
        virtual ~IStateManager() {}
        virtual void SomeMethod() = 0;
        virtual void AnotherMethod() = 0;
};

class TheState : public IStateManager, public SomeOtherParentClass
{
    virtual void SomeMethod(); // Defined in this class
    virtual void AnotherMethod(); // Also defined in this class
    //..
};

If you are defining some implementation in a .cpp for the IStateManager class, then you really have more of an abstract class and not an interface.

So in conclusion what I'm saying is: Any implementation of an "interface" should be defined in the .cpp file of its implementing class. And if you plan on using the interface in multiple files, I would create a separate .h file for it.

share|improve this answer

You can put the implementation of class methods in the header file. That doesn't mean you should. It also has nothing to do with the fact that this is an "interface" class, as you call it.

I wouldn't call this an interface class by the way, because your virtual methods aren't pure.

share|improve this answer
    
I know interfaces don't really exist as they do in c# or Java, but I want multiple classes to inherit from this "interface". So I want it isolated from other files or am I missing your point? –  Ruben-J Jan 14 '14 at 16:43
2  
I certainly wouldn't create a .cpp file just to store a couple sets of empty curly brackets {}. (Though "how should I create an interface in C++" is certainly a related question, which wasn't directly asked) –  user645280 Jan 14 '14 at 16:44

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.