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I have a namespace with several functions I use with a class that was already defined

class Object {
    struct SubObject{
        //...
    };
    //...
};


namespace Process
{
    Object::SubObject function1(Object& o){
        //..        
    }

    void function2(Object& o){
        //..
    }
}

Now, I have to generalize those functions with a template, I've noticed I cannot use one template over an entire namespace. Either I have to make a template for each functions (rather tedious considering I have to typedef each struct of the class each time), or I would like to know if I can do something like defining a class instead of a namespace :

template<typename TObject>
class Process
{
    typedef typename TObject::SubObject TSubObject;

    TSubObject function1(TObject& o){
        //..        
    }

    void function2(TObject& o){
        //..
    }
}

Is that correct code ? It seems strange to make a class I will never instanciate.

Also, I first wrote :

typedef TObject::SubObject TSubObject;

But my compiler asked me to add typename in front of TObject, I found this question explaining (or that's how I understood it) that it was because the compiler doesn't know if SubObject is a nested type or an member variable. But isn't typedef obligatorily followed by a type, then an alias ? I thought a class member (a variable or a function) cannot be "typedef"ed.

Thank you in advance for your answers.

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You can't call the functions in your sample without an instance, you'll need to make them static functions then! Another option is to simply provide templated functions at the namespace level. –  πάντα ῥεῖ Jan 14 at 17:04
    
@πάνταῥεῖ : Yes but I would have to make a template for each functions in the namespace, and make a typedef for each nested type in each function (I have like a dozen of nested type in Object, I would like to avoid doing typedef/typename every time). –  Demod Jan 14 at 17:09
    
Then use the other option with static functions in a templated class. –  πάντα ῥεῖ Jan 14 at 17:11

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

The C++ grammar/specification states that any time there is a qualified name that may be a type or a variable (even in say a typedef context), it will always be considered as a variable unless you prefix it with typename.

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