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I have a number of free functions in namespace Util that operate on class A, in the spirit of proper encapsulation. Class A is an abstract interface, so the util function will receive specialized derived variants, e.g. B. Some of the free functions need to access private methods in A that I don't want to expose. This is mainly due to bad design in A which is hard to change because of its role in a larger hierarchy of components. A solution is to subclass A as Aimpl and write wrapper functions such:

class A { //Is abstract polymorphic interface
public:
  virtual void SomeFunc() = 0;
protected:
  void ProtectedFunc() {SomeOtherFunc();}
private:
  void SomeOtherFunc();
};

class B : public A { //Overrides stuff in A and has added variables
public:
  virtual void SomeFunc();
};

Defined in a separate file I have

namespace {
class Aimpl : public A {
public:
  void WrapProtectedFunc() {ProtectedFunc();}
};
}

namespace Util {
void ProtectedFunc(A& instance) {
  try {
    Aimpl& aimpl = static_cast<Aimpl&>(instance);
    aimpl.WrapProtectedFunc();
  }
  catch (std::bad_cast) {}
}

First I wanted to use dynamic_cast, but this obviously fails since I might get a B Reference, and B is not a Aimpl. But static_cast and reinterpret_cast work fine, tested on Linux gcc4.4.

I get the eerie feeling I am summoning dragons here. I've tried to search for this and I've come to understand this may in fact be undefined behaviour. But is it really? Can we not guarantee that this cast will work out, when Aimpl just adds a public function to the interface?

Suggestions to achieve this in a better way are much welcome too.

edit:

I've since found the right way to do this using friend functions, declare the Util function inside the A header file such:

namespace Util {
  void ProtectedFunc(A& instance);
}

class A { //Is abstract polymorphic interface
public:
  virtual void SomeFunc() = 0;
private:
  void SomeOtherFunc();
  friend void Util::ProtectedFunc(A& instance);
};

The definition of Util::ProtectedFunc goes in the cpp file, and the goal is achieved; all users can write Util::ProtectedFunc(instance) instead of instance->ProtectedFunc().

share|improve this question
    
You can use dynamic_cast, and if the result is NULL then you know it's not "castable" (hence, in this case, it's a B). No need to catch an exception as far as I know. But dynamic_cast is pretty much the opposite of polymorphism, so I would try to avoid using this "operator" as much as possible... –  barak manos Jan 14 at 17:55
    
Since we're operating on references, dynamic_cast can throw if the types are not compatible. But static_cast won't, as correctly stated by @pentadecagon. I agree about avoiding the cast, it was just a necessity to use this ugly workaround. Which didn't work out anyway.. –  user1972808 Jan 20 at 12:16

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Won't work. First of all, WrapProtectedFunc is private so you can't call it anyway. The static_cast will compile, but you will get undefined behavior. This catch (std::bad_cast) {} is pointless, because static_cast never throws. Easy solution: Add WrapProtectedFunc as a public member to A, because if your free functions need access to internals of A, well, they need access to internals of A. And if A has any internals at all the term "abstract polymorphic interface" is not appropriate. BTW, Your class A as specified is neither abstract nor polymorphic.

share|improve this answer
1  
You're right, this is undefined behaviour and although it works cannot be relied on. Near as I can tell, there is no other way this pattern could work, it's simply broken. I've updated my question to reflect the final solution to the problem, which avoids adding the ProtectedFunc to the interface of A. –  user1972808 Jan 20 at 12:10

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